Thread: Question

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    Hello-

    I am not a firefighter, and am new to this forum. I figured who better to get the answer from than those who actually battle the blaze!

    My question is:

    a) Why do ya'll leave the door(s) on your apparatus open while it is parked in the bay? Is this some sort of time saver?

    b) If there is a purpose to leaving the door(s) open, why is it that sometimes only some doors are open, while others remain shut?

    Thanks in advance for your feedback!

    -mdb

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdb5464
    Hello-

    I am not a firefighter, and am new to this forum. I figured who better to get the answer from than those who actually battle the blaze!

    My question is:

    a) Why do ya'll leave the door(s) on your apparatus open while it is parked in the bay? Is this some sort of time saver?

    b) If there is a purpose to leaving the door(s) open, why is it that sometimes only some doors are open, while others remain shut?

    Thanks in advance for your feedback!

    -mdb
    We leave the doors open for a few reasons. One is to save time entering the apparatus. Another is to help dissipate the heat in the cab from the engine.
    Still another reason is because bunker coats hung on the grab rails beside the doors get in the way of closing them.
    The most common reason though is that we're just plain lazy.





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    Haha I like the lazy comment. I don't really see how leaving to door open would save more than .001 seconds, but the bunker gear on the rails and heat ventalation are valid reasons.

    Thanks Kevin!

    Another question: When the tone goes off (depending on the call ofcorse) is it a "mad dash" to the bay or do you guys (gals) walk normally?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdb5464
    Haha I like the lazy comment. I don't really see how leaving to door open would save more than .001 seconds, but the bunker gear on the rails and heat ventalation are valid reasons.

    Thanks Kevin!

    Another question: When the tone goes off (depending on the call ofcorse) is it a "mad dash" to the bay or do you guys (gals) walk normally?
    Actually it saves .014 seconds.

    Usually it is a brisk walk. If we're a good distance from the units (across the parking lot for example), We will jog/run to save time. No mad dashes. Truck room floors are notoriously slippery.
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    haha hey i guess that's .014 seconds quicker you get to a scene.

    when responding to a medical call (or any call that does not require you to wear your bunker gear) do you bring your bunker gear with you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdb5464
    haha hey i guess that's .014 seconds quicker you get to a scene.

    when responding to a medical call (or any call that does not require you to wear your bunker gear) do you bring your bunker gear with you?

    Yup, ALWAYS! It goes where we go.

    I've been to as many as 6 or 8 consecutive calls without ever getting back to the station.




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    There's a few reasons to leave the doors open:

    1-Nice breeze in the bay-it's not air conditioned.

    2-Helps dry out those slippery floors. Fire station apparatus bay floors are always wet-if the tank on the rig doesn't leak, the plumbing or the roof does.

    3-some of the older stations have the workout equipment in the bay-sweaty firemen stink. Other things stink too, like wet hose or bunker gear. See #1

    4-If you go a while without a run, it can get claustraphobic being in the station all day-letting the warm sunshine in makes it better.

    5-It lets the taxpayers see the trucks they paid big $ for, and makes it more likely that they may stop in to say hi (the guys REALLY appreciate it if you say hi while holding a pie or cookies )

    Which doors are open is often a matter of which one's we will remember to close on the way out, or are on the way to the rig. Bunker gear stays with you at all times.

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    Haha, excellent information! Thanks for the response!

    However, perhaps you thought I was refering to the apparatus bay doors themselves being open? I was actually talking about the doors on the trucks...whenever I drive by the fire station (housing an Engine and Rescue) the driver door and passenger-side rear door are open on the engine, and usually the passenger door on the rescue.

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    Ah, I misunderstood the question. I guess my brain didn't fully engage until the second part of the question. Glad you got something out of it anyhow.

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    It's personal preference.

    Fire trucks don't have inteior lights that stay on when the doors are open. The power to the rig is controlled by a battery switch that has to be turned on in order for the rig to be started. There are some things that have a constant power source, such as radio chargers, thermal imageing camera chargers, etc. There is a "shore line" connection for these that automatically ejects when the rig is started.

    Some rigs have air systems that are kept charged by shore line, too.

    Your turnout gear goes where you go.

    Get detailed to the car to pick up lunch.. bring your gear.
    Drop off or pick up paperwork at a substation or HQ: bring your gear.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdb5464
    Haha I like the lazy comment. I don't really see how leaving to door open would save more than .001 seconds, but the bunker gear on the rails and heat ventalation are valid reasons.

    Thanks Kevin!

    Another question: When the tone goes off (depending on the call ofcorse) is it a "mad dash" to the bay or do you guys (gals) walk normally?
    My station...some of the doors are open depending on the staff...if we have a 4man Engine/Rescue crew, 4 doors are open with their gear next to the door or hanging up on the side rails..if we only have 3 that day then IC,Engineers, and mine in the back stay open in quarters. As far as a mad dash to the truck....during the day depending on nature of the call...a nice "steady walk" ive seen some probies bite the back bumper of the rescue from running and slipping and WHACK!!! During the night, as i think most have also seen, tones drop at 3am...you go **** then its time for the run. hahahaha

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    Are you a reporter or writer, mdb? Or a civilian who wants to understand the things you see as you drive by your neighborhood firehouse?
    Last edited by RspctFrmCalgary; 02-04-2006 at 12:05 PM. Reason: To better express what I was trying to ask ...
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    We usually keep the day doors closed unless we are on the floor doing something. We also keep to all apparatus doors closed.

    This adds .014 seconds for the thiefs in our wonderful part of town to get in the rig if they get in the station.

    LOL.
    Stay low and move it in.

    Be safe.


    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdb5464
    Hello-
    a) Why do ya'll leave the door(s) on your apparatus open while it is parked in the bay? Is this some sort of time saver?
    Slamming (closing for you careful folks) a door is hard on the apparatus. One less closure lengthens the life of the apparatus.

    *Mark
    FTM-PTB-RFB-EGH

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdb5464
    Hello-

    I am not a firefighter, and am new to this forum. I figured who better to get the answer from than those who actually battle the blaze!

    My question is:

    a) Why do ya'll leave the door(s) on your apparatus open while it is parked in the bay? Is this some sort of time saver?

    b) If there is a purpose to leaving the door(s) open, why is it that sometimes only some doors are open, while others remain shut?

    Thanks in advance for your feedback!

    -mdb
    Here's the real reason...It's so we won't accidentally lock the keys inside the engine!

    (Actually, that is impossible, as there are no kocks on the apparatus doors and no keys for the ignition.)




    Kevin
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman4949
    (Actually, that is impossible, as there are no kocks on the apparatus doors and no keys for the ignition.)




    Kevin



    So thats why after all these years I could never find the keys to the engine!

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    Wink Actually....

    Firefighters leave 'em open on our apparatus for the same reason most police departments paint the doors on their patrol cars a differant color from the rest of the car...so we will know where to get in the truck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by herbroberson
    Firefighters leave 'em open on our apparatus for the same reason most police departments paint the doors on their patrol cars a differant color from the rest of the car...so we will know where to get in the truck!
    That's great!




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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman4949
    Here's the real reason...It's so we won't accidentally lock the keys inside the engine!

    (Actually, that is impossible, as there are no kocks on the apparatus doors and no keys for the ignition.)




    Kevin

    Ummm, actaully our old Ford/E-One had both keys and door locks.
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    time saved going to call = .014 sec

    cost of having doors cab or compartment fixed = $1,000's

    closing all doors after last call to save $ for the TAXPAYERS = PRICELESS



    unless valid reason like drying out compartments due to moisture etc,

    any departments require 360 deg. walk around before moving apparatus?

    We do


    Does this sound like a voice of experience, aww maybe
    Last edited by PFDFIREDOG; 02-13-2006 at 08:51 AM.

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    why do some departments plug in a cord of some sort into the firetrucks? i notice that about my department (i'll be a cadet in a year, but i still pay attention). whenever they get back to the station from a call, they always plug a cord into the trucks/engines/tactital support apparatus. why?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakebty
    why do some departments plug in a cord of some sort into the firetrucks? i notice that about my department (i'll be a cadet in a year, but i still pay attention). whenever they get back to the station from a call, they always plug a cord into the trucks/engines/tactital support apparatus. why?
    Shoreline power. There is a battery charger onboard that keeps the batteries fully charged. The more complex units also have outputs for keeping flashlights and portable radios charged (among other things).

    You may also see air hoses hooked up. This keeps the air brake tanks full. No matter how much maintenance you do, the thing will always leak somewhere when left sitting for many hours or days. This keeps it full all the time so we never have to wait for pressure to build up. Some of the afformentioned battery chargers have a small compressor built in which eliminates the need for an air hose. And for that matter, a busy (usually career) department doesn't need it at all because the truck is out so often that it never has time to leak.

    As for the doors, we don't leave the doors open unless the outlet for the shoreline power & air happens to be inside the door. Other than that, SHUT!
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakebty
    why do some departments plug in a cord of some sort into the firetrucks? i notice that about my department (i'll be a cadet in a year, but i still pay attention). whenever they get back to the station from a call, they always plug a cord into the trucks/engines/tactital support apparatus. why?
    nmfire hit it right on the head!

    We plug all of our apparatus into shore power for the exact same reasons. We have on-board chargers for flashlights, suction units, radios and thermal imaging cameras, as well as the charger for the main engine batteries. The chargers for all the portable equipment also work on D.C., but when the main batteries are switched off when the unit's engine is not running, A.C. powers the chargers.




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    ohh.....another question. i'm new to all of this so cut me some slack. it was said that engines/trucks don't have ignition keyholes. how are they powered then?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jakebty
    ohh.....another question. i'm new to all of this so cut me some slack. it was said that engines/trucks don't have ignition keyholes. how are they powered then?
    They have battery disconnect switches and engine starting (ignition) switches.
    Most of the older trucks had large, rotating battery isolator knobs that had to be turned, and starter/ignition buttons.

    The new designs use rocker switches that do the same thing.

    Turn on the batteries and push the ignition switch...Volia!




    Kevin

    (edit) There are still some units that have standard automotive type key switch ignitions, but they're fairly few and far between.
    Last edited by fireman4949; 02-14-2006 at 10:46 PM.
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