Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21
    MembersZone Subscriber dmleblanc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Not the end of the earth but I can see it from here...
    Posts
    2,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Resq14
    Very cool... that's the first practical thing I've learned on here in a long time.
    The idea of having a 25-30' utility rope in your pocket is a practical tip in itself....this is yet another use for it.....

    I keep trying to drop tips to my guys about carrying things like personal handlights, utility ropes or webbing, seat belt cutters and all that sort of stuff in their turnouts, but very few ever do it.....
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream ó and I hope you don't find this too crazy ó is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    ó C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"


  2. #22
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    956

    Default

    MattyJ, is this a new trick, or did a crusty old jake begin teaching it again? I've already began explaining this to guys here....great trick. I actually had to go try it after you posted it. I used a 25' section of 1" webbing, with a cheap 3$ beaner on one end to speed up the tying on the rung. Did as you said, quick and easy.
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

  3. #23
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    584

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pfd4life
    MattyJ, is this a new trick, or did a crusty old jake begin teaching it again? I've already began explaining this to guys here....great trick. I actually had to go try it after you posted it. I used a 25' section of 1" webbing, with a cheap 3$ beaner on one end to speed up the tying on the rung. Did as you said, quick and easy.
    One of the guys suggested we try it....I dont know if he saw it somewhere else...but Ive never seen or heard of it in my years on the job. We are always going out to buildings in our area and trying to find better ways to do things. Guys constantly come up with some great tricks. The only thing though...we had guys try it with webbing..and it was harder to keep the webbing under your foot. We found simple old rope with a dog clip (what most guys carry) on one end worked best, and was easier to hold under your foot.
    Last edited by MattyJ; 02-14-2006 at 08:24 AM.

  4. #24
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    284

    Default

    Matty's instruction from page 1 of the thread

    We take our 25-30' utility rope out of our pocket...tie one end around the bottom rung...run the rope to the tip of the ladder, underneath it (on the ground). Now you lift the ladder (parallel to the building) As soon as the ladder is chest high, you step on the rope and push the ladder against the rope to make it taught. Now as you raise the ladder, you walk the rope like a highwire act. As long as you keep the rope tight under your feet, it will act as your butt-man.

    I can't wait to drill on this at work tomorrow. Do you have any pictures of this Matty?

  5. #25
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    584

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by R1SAlum
    Matty's instruction from page 1 of the thread

    We take our 25-30' utility rope out of our pocket...tie one end around the bottom rung...run the rope to the tip of the ladder, underneath it (on the ground). Now you lift the ladder (parallel to the building) As soon as the ladder is chest high, you step on the rope and push the ladder against the rope to make it taught. Now as you raise the ladder, you walk the rope like a highwire act. As long as you keep the rope tight under your feet, it will act as your butt-man.

    I can't wait to drill on this at work tomorrow. Do you have any pictures of this Matty?
    No....maybe next time Im in I'll get some.

  6. #26
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    956

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MattyJ
    One of the guys suggested we try it....I dont know if he saw it somewhere else...but Ive never seen or heard of it in my years on the job. We are always going out to buildings in our area and trying to find better ways to do things. Guys constantly come up with some great tricks. The only thing though...we had guys try it with webbing..and it was harder to keep the webbing under your foot. We found simple old rope with a dog clip (what most guys carry) on one end worked best, and was easier to hold under your foot.
    I did notice that there was a big difference with the webbing and rope. Guess I'll just carry both now
    FF/NREMT-B

    FTM-PTB!!

    Brass does not equal brains.

    Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the ability to control it.

  7. #27
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    284

    Default

    Matty

    The Engine and the Truck just got done drilling on this procedure. We started out with a 16í roof ladder to get our mechanics down and then moved to a 24 and 30. The drill went very well and we made some observations; when getting under the ladder, push it forward a little to make the rope taut. Raising it by placing the hands on the beams instead of the rungs allows for a slightly wider stance since your steps are tracking on a straight line from walking on the rope. On a ladder with a fly section, we tied into the bed section only, this allowed us to work with the ladder immediately after raising it. One more thing of note; the last few feet before the ladder gets perpendicular seems to work better if you get off the rope for that final push or it wonít raise form the rope holding it back.. We did the drill on grass and both smooth and rough finished concrete and it worked great. After catching a few runs in our district it was easy to see where this evolution can be used.

    According to one of our history books, we sent Battalion Chiefs and Captains to the FDNY in the 1800ís to garner training, order book , and rules and regulations ideas in our early paid years. The gifting continues and I only hope we can return the favor someday.

  8. #28
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    584

    Default

    Glad it helped. We always use the beams to raise a portable ladder, it offers more control (constant contact w/ both hands) For that matter, when we climb, we climb with our hand around the beams, not the rungs. It is very important to only attatch the rope to the bed ladder, so it can be used without removing the rope.
    Last edited by MattyJ; 02-15-2006 at 09:16 AM.

  9. #29
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3

    Default

    MattyJ,

    Were you able to get any pictures of this technique? Thanks!!

  10. #30
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    81

    Default

    Does anyone have any pics or video they are willing to share on this method?

    I am a bit confused. You tie the rope to the bottom rung? Then over the top rung?
    Last edited by masterFF; 09-24-2007 at 01:26 PM.

  11. #31
    Forum Member BKDRAFT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Very interesting Matty but I can throw 28's and everything lower in length by myself without using this technique with no problem in alleys on beam. So is this just to aid in throwing the ladders solo?

  12. #32
    MembersZone Subscriber Halligan84's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1999
    Location
    Blackwood NJ, USA
    Posts
    816

    Default

    We tried it after Matty posted it the first time and it does work. I have some pics that I will post if I can figure it out, if not email me. We set the ladder on one beam, tied the rope on the bottom rung and laid it on the ground past the tip of the ladder. Drop the ladder back down and stand on the rope as you lift the tip. Works as advertised!

    halligan84@comcast.net

  13. #33
    Forum Member backsteprescue123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    4,318

    Default

    Could I please get those pictures?
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  14. #34
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    1,214

    Default

    Thanks to Halligan84 for the photos. Tried it with a 24 today, it was easy! Nice trick, thanks guys!!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. World Of Fire Report: 01-25-05
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-26-2005, 10:24 PM
  2. ground ladder training
    By jake15 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-20-2004, 04:11 PM
  3. Quints
    By imtxff44 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-29-2003, 12:16 AM
  4. quint concept
    By mattqc99 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 05-25-2003, 11:34 AM
  5. ground ladder operation
    By scubateam in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-27-2002, 02:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts