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  1. #21
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    With my department it depends. We are a small volunteer company so if you're getting close to the job and no one else has signed on radio you'd better lay in. But if you hear other engines coming you can go in dry and the 2nd due engine will supply you.


  2. #22
    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasper45
    Our first due engine is supposed to pull past the fire building, our second due backs down the street and drops both three inch lines and then takes a plug.
    Our policy is if your second or third due, you slow up and back down to supply.
    We will do this if the fire is in a cove or other dead end situation - just curious why don't you just stop at 1st and drive foward to the next plug?

    Here the 1st engine will only supply itself if it is with reach of handstretching the supply line. Otherwise, the 2nd arriving engine will supply the first by hooking to it and driving to the next plug. That pumper will then get on the plug and supply the 1st through the pump. This allows us to boost the pressure of the supply line if needed or allows the fire to be pumped through the 2nd pumper shpuld something happen to the first or vice versa.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  3. #23
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    Default Laying Dual 3 inch Lines

    I could never understand this procedure.It takes to much time and manpower to lay two 3 inch lines.plus the friction loss is greater with 3 inch lines then one 4 or 5 inch line.Plus laying a 4 inch down the street to the scene pumper is alot easier then backing down the Street.

  4. #24
    Forum Member Squad1LT's Avatar
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    Our first engine typically spots past the fire building and th second engine supplie water usually by a forward lay from the next hydrant. I like to come in from the opposite direction and get the pumpers nose to nose. It leaves the street less congestion for trucks.

  5. #25
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    If there is visible fire/heavy smoke approaching the scene the 1st due engine lays its supply line ( not from a hydrant because we dont have any in our district but from where a fill site is to be set up)

    but most of the time 2nd due lays in

  6. #26
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    RT ...

    I think that a lot of departments that still use 3" would like to use 4" or 5", but it's a matter of money. To replace 3" on a truck and add the needed valves and adapters is a pretty significant investment, which a lot of departments simply cannot afford. My guess would be in the area of at least $15,000-20,000 per truck for a 600-700' bed.

    Also if you look at a lot of the urban departments that still use 3", the lays are relativly short and dual 3" lines can generally supply thier needs.

  7. #27
    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rtguyfl
    I could never understand this procedure.It takes to much time and manpower to lay two 3 inch lines.
    How is that? Laying 2 lines doesn't take any more manpower and might take maybe an extra 30 seconds to get he second line charged, even when you combine the hook up time on both ends.

    Just for the record I am speaking of laying 2 lines. Do you mean sculling 2 lines by hand from one stationary pumper to another?
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  8. #28
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    My company has the 2nd engine in to lay reverse to the hydrant. That engine connects to the hydrant with a 5" supply and pump 2 - 3" lines to the 1st engine company.

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