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  1. #1
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    Question Laying the Supply Line

    How does your department work their supply line? First engine drop the line & 2nd pick up the hydrant? First engine to 'A' divison & second engine lays in to them? etc... Pictures and or video would be greatly appreciated. Post here or e-mail me @ sta224ffemt@comcast.net. Thanks!


  2. #2
    Forum Member fireman4949's Avatar
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    With a few exceptions, second due lays the 5", usually in a forward lay.




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  3. #3
    Forum Member Dave1983's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fireman4949
    With a few exceptions, second due lays the 5", usually in a forward lay.




    Kevin
    Ditto. Second due engine is always water supply unless there is a hydrant within easy reach of the first due, or the first due lays its own line. The first due has this option if one, they have heavy fire showing from a distance, or two, the second due will be delayed. If it #1, the second due will lay from a second hydrant.
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  4. #4
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    Everybody is responsible for their own water. On "special" occasions the 2nd due will assist the 1st with supply should the 1st run into a dead hydrant or low pressure. But as a rule, if you wanna play, bring your own water. Most have lost the habit of "taking a wrap" and have gone to stretching back or forward to the hydrant using 3". We do have a pony length of 5" hooked to a front suction that helps. Makes it easy for the Driver to nose into a hydrant just passed the building allowing front access for the ladders.
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  5. #5
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    We reverse out most of the time so you get your own water. Our SOG state it is the responsibility of the second engine to make sure the first has water. So if the engineer has a problem or is on a dead hydrant the second will continue the lead out or do whatever is needed.
    Where I work with LDH it depends on conditions, if we take the time to forward in then we often make our own hydrant also. But the same rule also applies that it is the duty of the second due to make sure you have water.

  6. #6
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    In my company, it all depends on the situation. If it is a working fire and if the police, EMS, or fire officer confirms a working fire, the first engine is laying the line. If the first engine arrives w/o an officer on scene, the second engine is laying in.

  7. #7
    Forum Member VinnieB's Avatar
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    We backstretch......basically.... we pull past the fire building, take our lengths off and the engine drives to a hydrant. If the hydrant is bad, the ECC transmits a 10-70 and the Second Due Engine goes for a hydrant and the Control men hand stretch 3.5 line.

  8. #8
    the 4-1-4 Jasper 45's Avatar
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    Our first due engine is supposed to pull past the fire building, our second due backs down the street and drops both three inch lines and then takes a plug.
    Our policy is if your second or third due, you slow up and back down to supply.

  9. #9
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    here the first arriving engine makes a forward lay.............
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  10. #10
    HNFC FF/President mdoddsjffhnfc's Avatar
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    all depends on the situation, if we know we're going to work, then we're not passing that nearest hydrant, we'll wrap and lay in. If we're unsure of conditions, 1st due engine goes directly to the fire building. If we have fire conditions then, the 2nd due engine will wrap and lay.

    If we're the 2nd due engine into Mutual aid, and if the hydrant is closer laying out, then we'll lay out. We have a hydro-assist on our 1st out engine, and both engines carry 4"
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  11. #11
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    1st due will drop a 3” line and lay in for “Quick Water”. 2nd due will then reverse down and drop a 5” back out to either the hydrant or the river. Never had a problem with this, and you will always have a back up supply line in case one of them fails.

  12. #12
    Forum Member nmfire's Avatar
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    Fist engine has 1200' of 5" hose an a siamise clapper on the end. Lay in to the scene from whichever is the best place. Usually it is the top of the driveway or a nearby intersection. All depends on distance and the layout of the neighborhood.

    Second unit in is the 3000 gallon tanker. Tanker hooks up to the siamise and starts supplying the engine as needed.

    Third unit in is another engine with another 1200ft or so of 5". This is where command makes a decision on what do with it. It could come to the scene drop crew and equipment and do a reverse lay from the siamise to a water source like a pond or burried tank. The engine would then draft and pump water to the scene. The other option is the engine doing a forward lay from a water source to the scene. The 5" is hooked up to the siamise and the engine does engine things at the scene. A mutual aid engine would respond to the water source and do the draft.

    In the event that there is no nearby water source, the siamise would be used for mutual aid tanker shuttles. Being that it is a clappered siamise, trucks can come and go without the need for manual gates. Our tanker also has a drop-tank that can be used as needed.

    The tricky part is getting everything else down the road and down the driveway. It helps to have someone make sure the LDH is down the side of a long driveway so the rescue and mutual aid ladder can get down.
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  13. #13
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    We almost quit doing reverse lays until we figured out how to stop tearing the red lights off the roof of the cab.
    Seriously, we are pretty flexible in our approach. We use 5" LDH, and SOP says 2nd in Engine is responsible for water supply, but, if the 1st in has reason, they can lay in and establish a supply line off the hydrant, or they can lay in and 2nd in hooks to the hydrant and pumps the line (we have no 4-way valves). We do try to use reverse lays when pumping an elevated stream, or if we have more than 500 ft. stretched out. I know we were all taught that the 5" hose will give you all you need, but, when it starts to go over 500 ft., we like to pump it to make sure. I like reverse lays because on a tight street, it gets the 2nd engine away from the immediate work area.

  14. #14
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    Everyone gets their own hydrant.
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

  15. #15
    Forum Member Res343cue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChicagoFF
    Everyone gets their own hydrant.
    What are hydrants?








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  16. #16
    Forum Member Station2Capt's Avatar
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    2nd in will catch the plug in most cases. If the plug is near the house the driver of the first in will grab it. It is all up to the officer on that first in engine. If I know before we get there (smoke showing for several blocks I start looking for a plug while we are approaching the scene).
    A "Good" fire is not measured by how big it is, but by the fact that everyone is going home safe, and that we possibly learned something new about firefighting. Member:IACOJ

  17. #17
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    we have one station with 2 engines and a tl. All usually respond at the same time. first eng. pulls a bit past house, second engine pulls just past house. Second engine will hit hydrant if in close proximity to house but not in front. Usually, first engine drops a 5" line to the second engine and goes for a hydrant. since we only have 600' of 5" it is usually connected direct to hydrant. For longer lays we use dual 3" and the first engine will hook into the hydrant.

    Because we only have one per rig (yes we are more than drivers) this has been the fastest way of securing a water source.

  18. #18
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    First due engine takes the hydrant, second due engine can do their own work, First due supplies tower, or they catch their own(yes it's a quint ).
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  19. #19
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    My department usually has first due do a forward lay, but we're lucky and have quite a few hydrants in my town, and it may be as simple as grabbing and extra 20 ft lengt of LDH from a compartment and rolling it out to the hydrant 5 ft from the truck. Once in a while though we may have second due or mutual aid do a reverse lay and pump into the first due.

  20. #20
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    Basically do not have a policy here as the situation varies. In many cases, we can easily move more water through a tanker operation than we can get from a rural hydrant, so often they are ignored. If we have a solid hydrant avaialable, generally the attack truck is initally supplied by a 3000 gallon tanker and a pumper is staged at the nearest hydrant. If the IC determines that the fire requires a permanent water source, that pumper will lay the line in. If the hydrant is close enough, a couple of rookies will hand-jack the line from the attack pump to it. One rare occasions the attack pump will lay if the fire appears to require it or the structure is at the end of a long driveway.

    As I said, more often than not we will simply use the water on our our 2 3000 gallon tankers and 6000 gallon tanker (our other 4 pumps have 1250 tanks and are set up as pumper-tankers). There isn't much that in our area with the exception of the refinary and some commercial buildings that requires much more than water than our tankers can supply.

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