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Thread: Curtain Call...

  1. #1
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Curtain Call...

    February 19, 2006 -- A heat-resistant curtain that helped extinguish a Queens inferno and save three trapped firefighters last month was invented by two of the city's Bravest. "I'm so proud that we made this thing and it worked," said retired firefighter Tom Oswald, 49, who worked out of Ladder 19 in the Bronx until last year.
    "These guys were able to go home that night. That's the most important thing," Oswald said of the Queens firefighters who were trapped by a Jan. 26 blaze, so hot it melted the brass nozzle of an FDNY hose. Oswald and Queens firefighter Pat Kilduff created the "KO Curtain" to help the city's Bravest fight fires in tall buildings where fierce winds tend to blow through broken windows and fuel the flames. The blaze last month at the Beach 41st Houses in the Rockaways was the first time the 20-pound prototype was used during a fire. The curtain is a blend of bulletproof Kevlar and Nomex, a fire-resistant fabric. It has six copper rods sewn inside to weigh it down.
    Firefighters draped the 5-by-8-foot curtain across broken windows on the building's sixth floor to stop strong winds from feeding the inferno. The curtain helped give firefighters from Ladder 121 and Engine 264, who had been trapped at the end of a hall, enough time to dose the blaze and escape the building.Oswald and Kilduff, who works out of Ladder 134 in the Rockaways, came up with the idea for the curtain in 1989 after a string of high-rise fires in the Bronx. They spent years brainstorming, sewing together prototypes with help from Oswald's wife and testing the blanket off the former firefighter's roof before recently presenting their creation to FDNY brass."Our firefighters have always been innovative and resourceful, especially when its comes to their tools," said FDNY spokesman David Billig.
    The curtain is still being evaluated by fire officials. Seven fire companies have been asked to test its effectiveness."We're hoping that every truck company in the job will get one of these things," Oswald said. "This is something that's going to save lives, not only firemen but civilians."
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************


  2. #2
    This space for rent NYSmokey's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Great job guys. I hope they patent this new tool so that some MUTT doesn't steal a great idea and make money off of it. I'm sure a lot of metro departments will be interested in how this turns out and it has already shown that it can save lives.
    Tom

    Never Forget 9-11-2001

    Stay safe out there!

    IACOJ Member

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    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
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    I remember hearing about this idea to combat the "blowtorch effect" several years ago but didn't know what became of it. I'm glad Oswald and Kilduff didn't just leave their idea at the kitchen table.
    ullrichk
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    I was talking to a couple of FDNY guys about this last week. This is an amazing tool that not only is practical and effective, it is also scientifically sound. What happens when you get bozo engineers involved? you get a freaking elevated death trap that runs up and down the side of a building. what happens when you let a FF brainstorm and solve a FF problem? Why don't we ask Mr. Halligan or Mr. Bourke about that one?

    Good job, guys.

  5. #5
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Absolutely..................

    I can only add "Me Too" to George's remarks. Good Job.
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    MembersZone Subscriber nozzelvfd's Avatar
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    i'm just curious as to what the material is, the curtain made of. I am assuming a normal salvage cover is not going to have the same effect as this curtain.

    Either way it is a great idea and thankfully it saved the lives of these men.
    You need only two tools: WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the duct tape.

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    Forum Member DeputyChiefGonzo's Avatar
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    It's in the story that Ray posted...

    Nomex and Kevlar.
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    Quote Originally Posted by nozzelvfd
    i'm just curious as to what the material is, the curtain made of. .

    from almost dead center of Ray's post:

    Quote Originally Posted by E40FDNYL35
    ...The curtain is a blend of bulletproof Kevlar and Nomex, a fire-resistant fabric...
    I.A.C.O.J. "The Cork"

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber nozzelvfd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainGonzo
    It's in the story that Ray posted...

    Nomex and Kevlar.

    Opps....sorry Captain. Thats my fault I failed reading when I was in school bare with me....LOL
    You need only two tools: WD-40 and duct tape. If it doesn't move and it should, use WD-40. If it moves and shouldn't, use the duct tape.

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    MembersZone Subscriber jfTL41's Avatar
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    40/35 how is this blanket different from the ones the Squads and rescues have had for the last few years? Hopefully it's lighter!

  11. #11
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jfTL41
    40/35 how is this blanket different from the ones the Squads and rescues have had for the last few years? Hopefully it's lighter!
    I'm not sure. I know the old one was heavy and a pain in the *** to use. The truck still has one.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

  12. #12
    FIREMAN 1st GRADE E40FDNYL35's Avatar
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    February 27, 2006 -- Three firefighters suffered second-degree burns to the face battling a treacherous fire in a Bronx high-rise yesterday, officials said.
    The 4 p.m. fire shattered the windows of a 24th-floor apartment at 20 W. Mosholu Parkway S., allowing heavy winds to rush in and create a "blowtorch effect" that sent flames leaping at firefighters, officials said - spurring Mayday calls. "They were covering the withdrawal of the other firefighters," Assistant Chief Robert Sweeney said of the three injured men. The firefighters, whose names were not released, were in stable condition in the burn unit at Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan. Six other firefighters and two civilians suffered minor injuries in the fire.
    An FDNY source said the three firefighters who suffered facial burns managed to escape from the intense fire and sought refuge in a stairwell, where Mayday calls were issued at 4:37 p.m., officials said. The fire was brought under control at 5:12 p.m. with the aid of fire-resistant blankets draped from windows above the burning apartment. The blankets, invented by Firefighters Tom Oswald and Pat Kilduff in 1989 and dubbed KO Curtains, were used to block winds from fanning the flames, allowing firefighters back into the apartment to put out the blaze, officials said. While the fire burned into the apartment above and the building was evacuated, the occupants of apartment 24D, where the blaze began, got out uninjured, officials said. The FDNY said the cause of the fire remained under investigation but did not appear to be suspicious.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
    CAPT. Frank Callahan Ladder 35 *
    LT. John Ginley Engine 40
    FF. Bruce Gary Engine 40
    FF. Jimmy Giberson Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Otten Ladder 35 *
    FF. Steve Mercado Engine 40 *
    FF. Kevin Bracken Engine 40 *
    FF. Vincent Morello Ladder 35
    FF. Michael Roberts Ladder 35 *
    FF. Michael Lynch Engine 40
    FF. Michael Dauria Engine 40

    Charleston 9
    "If my job was easy a cop would be doing it."
    *******************CLICK HERE*****************

  13. #13
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    so hot it melted the brass nozzle of an FDNY hose.
    Brass nozzles?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42
    Brass nozzles?
    Many companies still have the brass tips for their nozzles. They are longer and produce a smoother and more compact stream than the shorter tips produced today, much like a playpipe on a stang nozzle. Thus giving the nozzle team better penetration.

    It is a tradition carried on by many companies as the same tip has been used by the same company for decades to put out fires.

    A tangible link to the past to remind the members they are members of a company that has had many men pass through their doors, all of whom have been to 1000s of fires and made many pushes and held their ground with that very tip. A reminder to todays members that they have a reputation to live up to. aka=Company pride.

    FTM-PTB

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    On a related note there was a good picture of the hallway at the Rockaways fire in our Pass-Along Bulletins.

    I don't know if any of our members on here have access to it online but it would be a great picture to demonstrate why this silly sh*t about using 1 3/4 lines or fog tips off a standpipe is completely misguided.

    FTM-PTB

  16. #16
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFFRED
    Many companies still have the brass tips for their nozzles. They are longer and produce a smoother and more compact stream than the shorter tips produced today, much like a playpipe on a stang nozzle. Thus giving the nozzle team better penetration.

    It is a tradition carried on by many companies as the same tip has been used by the same company for decades to put out fires.

    A tangible link to the past to remind the members they are members of a company that has had many men pass through their doors, all of whom have been to 1000s of fires and made many pushes and held their ground with that very tip. A reminder to todays members that they have a reputation to live up to. aka=Company pride.

    FTM-PTB
    FFFred, as usual, thanks for the info.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFFRED
    Many companies still have the brass tips for their nozzles. They are longer and produce a smoother and more compact stream than the shorter tips produced today, much like a playpipe on a stang nozzle. Thus giving the nozzle team better penetration.
    How much longer? Last month's Fire Engineering had a pic of a smooth bore of recent vintage that looked like it was a good 9" from bail to tip. Perhaps they are still available?



    A tangible link to the past to remind the members they are members of a company that has had many men pass through their doors, all of whom have been to 1000s of fires and made many pushes and held their ground with that very tip. A reminder to todays members that they have a reputation to live up to. aka=Company pride.

    Reminds me of a line from a poem:

    The Station from which I now repond
    Is overstaffed with heroes gone

    Thanks for the info, and sorry for dragging this thread a little further off topic.
    ullrichk
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ullrichk
    How much longer? Last month's Fire Engineering had a pic of a smooth bore of recent vintage that looked like it was a good 9" from bail to tip. Perhaps they are still available?
    Perhaps but the job doesn't purchase them...so you either have the original Brass nozzle or you use the ones the tool shop issues today.

    FTM-PTB

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