1. #1
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    Default To the pump or Tank?

    Whats the best? When receving water from a city hydrant, is it better to connect so that the water goes directly into the pump or should the water be directed into the tank? I'll apoligize in advance if this has been addressed in the past as I could't find it. Thanks in advance.

    KennyV.

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    On any model engine I'm familiar with, the intakes you usually connect to ( the 4" or 5" ones ) go directly to the pump. There is a smaller, 2 1/2 inch "direct tank fill" that I have only seen used for foam ops or refilling after a car fire.

    If you were to connect a feeder line to the tank, and the tank was full, any amount of water not going out the attack lines would blow out the top fill. While I suppose this wouldn't interfere with job #1, keeping water to the attack lines, it sure wouldn't make you look very good.

    Hope this is what you were looking for.

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    Into the pump is the normal way. Often pumpers are not set up to pump their capacity out of the tank. This is being changed more often as of late, but frequently overlooked still. Unless your pumping B-foam with an around the pump proportioner, in which case you must go into the tank or sing "tiny bubbles".

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    Straight to the pump, then crack the tank fill valve so you can fill your tank. Always good to have that 500 gallons in case your hydrant dies.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    Straight to the pump, then crack the tank fill valve so you can fill your tank. Always good to have that 500 gallons in case your hydrant dies.
    this is how we do it also ...........
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
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    Smile engineer tfd

    Quote Originally Posted by Weruj1
    this is how we do it also ...........
    i would say that if you have a water source that is a good one,us it! a good rule of thumb,the water you carry on the fire engine is suposed to be used mainly for emergency back up for your firefighters to get out if your water source is interupted or lost. i know that many fires that departments have you can us the water from the engine, and you probably will. just keep in mind of what is the most important factor, your men and yourself... weather you us thewater from the tank or from the hydrant is a factor of what is burning? how big is what burning?and do you think that the water you carry will put the fire out without a water supply? if you use the water from the tank, and you get a water supply, crack the tank fiil until you fiil the tank back up and then shut the valve off and us the hydrant straight to the pump.if the hydrant is not supplying you enough water,then you many have to relay two pumpers together and do a water shuttle. hope this helps

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    A little more technical viewpoint...

    Connect to the pump. Pumps are rated at draft, not with positive intake pressure. When pumping from your tank, the pump must produce all of the energy (Pressure) to supply the chosen attack lines/streams because it is only feeding into the pump by gravity. Additionally, your pumps are only capable of a certain GPM with the piping installed from the tank. Depending on the vintage of your pumps, this may only be 2 1/2" piping. Basically, youll never be able to acheive the pumps capacity from your tank (not that youu would want to) unless you specially wrote your specs. that way. Typically 3" or 4" tank to pump piping is the standard these days.

    Utilizing your pump suction (intake) to supply ypour pump from the hydrant gives the pump the advantage of not having to produce the same amount of energy (PSI) that it would if you were running roght from your tank.

    For example: You have a 150 PSI Discharge pressure requirment for a handline. From tank water supplying your pump, the entire 150 PSI must be produced at the pump, thus causing higher engine rpm's. If you have a hydrant with 80 PSI residual pressure (thats what the intake guage on your panel reads while the water is flowing thru your handline) then the pump must produce only 70 PSI, thereby keeping your RPM lower.

    Pumps (centrifugal) profit (or add to) incoming pressure. Any pressure you have on the intake side can be subtracted from your total pressure and the difference is all the pump must produce.

    At a fire the other day, I had the pump at idle speed with two 180 GPM handlines flowing and 200' of 4" supply line in the street. 110 PSI inlet pressure, thats the required discharge pressure. Essentially the pump was just letting water pass throough.

    If you have a very bad hydrant, consider going into the direct tank fill. If you arent putting out more water than is coming in, the tank will hopefully maintain a workable level. When doing this, also remember that you are limited to your total flow capability by the available water coming in. Sometimes, nurse tanker type operations choose to do this to the attack engine, where the tanker pumps into the attack engines tank.

    On the pump panel or officers side panel, the small 2 1/2" connection usually isnt a direct tank fill. Its nothing more than an auxillary suction inlet directly into the pump.

    Someone mentioned overflow of the tank. When pumping from an external supply, it is always good practice to let a small amount of water flow into the tank and continuously overflow or flow a trickle out of a side discharge to keep from overheating the pump, especially if the hoselines arent constantly flowing.

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    Thanks for the input. I appreciate it and it will help clear up a discussion we've had, I hope. Thanks again, stay low, stay safe.

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