1. #1
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    Default WTC response question

    May seem like a dumb question but....

    When training recruits in our academy I used the WTC as an example of firefighters protecting avenues of egress with hoselines. Another instructor stated that he wasn't sure whether the FDNY was actually able to place hose streams in operation before the collapse but were able to facillitate evacuation of many occupants. It would seem to me that they would have had time to do so, but may have had supply issues.

    I know its a sensitive subject and I don't want to reopen old wounds, but I don't want to put the wrong info out there. Can someone shed some light on this?

  2. #2
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    Im not positive, but I believe I heard that the standpipes were destroyed where the planes hit. I think I heard that water would have been a problem because standpipe was the only means of a water supply.

  3. #3
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    I do remember hearing on the radio that some units were able to get a line into place, and some new info leads to it....and they were trying to hold. I also remember hearing a mayday for a member in cardiac arrest way before the towers collapsed.......

    But why use this as an example....it wasn't your "everyday" fire.....

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    i just overheard it from people talking. I wasn't on the job yet, I wasn't there.

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    http://www.9-11commission.gov/report/index.htm


    We realized that, because of the impact of the plane, that there was some structural damage to the building, and most likely that the fire suppression systems within the building were probably damaged and possibly
    inoperable. . . .We knew that at the height of the day there were as many
    as 50,000 people in this building.We had a large volume of fire on the
    upper floors. Each floor was approximately an acre in size. Several floors
    of fire would have been beyond the fire-extinguishing capability of the
    forces that we had on hand. So we determined, very early on, that this
    was going to be strictly a rescue mission.We were going to vacate the
    building, get everybody out, and then we were going to get out.58

    Between 9:45 and 9:58, the ascending battalion chief continued to lead FDNY operations on the upper floors of the South Tower.At 9:50, an FDNY ladder company encountered numerous seriously injured civilians on the 70th floor.With the assistance of a security guard, at 9:53 a group of civilians trapped in an elevator on the 78th-floor sky lobby were found by an FDNY company. They were freed from the elevator at 9:58. By that time the battalion chief had reached the 78th floor on stairwell A; he reported that it looked open to the 79th floor,well into the impact zone. He also reported numerous civilian fatalities in the area.

    First responders also played a significant role in the success of the evacuation.Some specific rescues are quantifiable, such as an FDNY company’s rescue of civilians trapped on the 22d floor of the North Tower, or the success of FDNY, PAPD, and NYPD personnel in carrying nonambulatory civilians out of both the North and South Towers. In other instances, intangibles combined to reduce what could have been a much higher death total. It is impossible to measure how many more civilians who descended to the ground floors would have died but for the FDNY, NYPD and PAPD personnel directing them—via safe exit routes that avoided jumpers and debris—to leave the complex urgently but calmly. It is impossible to measure how many more civilians would have died but for the determination of many members of the FDNY, PAPD, and NYPD to continue assisting civilians after the South Tower collapsed. It is impossible to measure the calming influence that ascending firefighters had on descending civilians or whether but for the firefighters’ presence the poor behavior of a very few civilians could have caused a dangerous and panicked mob flight. But the positive impact of the first responders on the evacuation came at a tremendous cost of first responder lives lost.201.
    Last edited by E40FDNYL35; 03-07-2006 at 06:12 PM.
    ALL GAVE SOME BUT SOME GAVE ALL
    NEVER FORGET 9-11-01
    343
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  6. #6
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    It was just an impromptu example that I gave during a lecture about hoseline placement; an incident I knew they would all be familiar with.

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