1. #1
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    Default Search Line, Rescue Line, Escape Rope: What to use?

    What is recommended for search, rescue and escape rope/lines?
    Lengths?
    Material?
    Sizes and sources?
    Any other topics concerning this?

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    Default search line, rescue line, escape rope

    Search line.
    3/8" Kevlar several different uses directional rope 150' every twenty feet two knots about 6" apart, 18" back one ( two knots leads in, one out).

    3/8" Kevlar large area - twenty feet one metal ring, forty metal ring one knot, 60' metal ring two knots 200 feet total ring at the end to allow you to expand. (Chicago style) each metal ring you can clip into and search off the main line

    I recommend Kevlar because you can train with it and not worry about damaging it. Right know for training I use regular utility grade home depot stuff.

    Escape rope I use 6mm 40 feet with 10' piece of tubular webbing covering the first ten feet tied with a barrel knot with a loop. I slip a halligon bar in to the loop and place it across the bottom of the window sill. The barrel knot tightens around the halligon and the webbing protects the escape rope from the edge.

    Go to http://www.tes2training.com/handouts.php
    Search line survival really good reading

    Rescue line not sure what you mean, But I use 8mm life safety rope 150' long with three large ladder belt style beaners with two pulleys ( mclees system or high anchor system attached to a ladder). Hope this helps

    vesrescue

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    Quote Originally Posted by vesrescue
    Rescue line not sure what you mean, But I use 8mm life safety rope 150' long with three large ladder belt style beaners with two pulleys ( mclees system or high anchor system attached to a ladder). Hope this helps

    vesrescue
    Thanks for the helpful info. Helps out a lot.
    Concerning rescue, I'm refering to FF rescue during a RIT operation.
    Should the search rope be able to do double duty as a rescue rope if needed?
    Example: had to pull someone up from a hole/fallen floor, hot conditions, rough jagged edges.

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    dadman:
    On a drill we try only to use what we carried in our pockets, we had a 5' square hole cut in the floor with a down firefighter. So I tried to use my personal escape rope with handcuff knot, four members on our team the down firefighter weight with gear about 320, he was in a lot of pain cause the small diameter rope was griping really tight thru his jacket. It worked but he was pretty mad. Small diameter rope creates a grip strength problem for the team pulling, and a constricting problem around the forearms of the victim. I think that 1/2'" rope works good for this type of rescue but 1/2'" for search rope makes the bag two big and bulky. Have you tried a charged hose line to remove a DIF from a lower level it works great for conciouse or un-conscious firefighters?

    Vesrescue

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    dadman...a 3/8" search rope like ves was talking about is strong enough to do almost anything you might need in an emergency. I'd rappel on a shoelace to save a brother. Even if a smaller size rope hurts the wrists, it's alot less pain than being in a burn center getting a skin graft....It definately is good training with what you have in your pockets, but also train with what your RIT team brings in...On the main search rope which is 200ft we have the knots every 20ft starting from the beginning. First knot is 20', second is 40' and so on.

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    Vesrescue,
    What is your procedure for pulling a downed FF with a charge hoseline? Heard it mention a lot of times, but never seen it or had it described.

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    mislandw:
    When you approach the hole you drop the line in to the hole creating a loop,leaving the nozzle above. If the firefighter is conscious he can place his arms over the hose and hang on. The firefighters above pull on the hose and the firefighter in the hole will rise up thru the hole. If he is unconscious then you must lower a firefighter down with the hose he can set the DIF (down or injured firefighter) in a seat position place the hose in his armpits and place his wrists under his waist strap and tighten then. The upper firefighters then pull on the hose.
    The pressure in the line will help with the pull because the line wants to go straight out, of course high pressure will help. I think I have some pics I will check if I due I will send them to you.

    I hope i explained it okay:
    Vesman

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    Vesrescue,
    Thanks for the info. You painted a pretty good picture.

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    When you're drilling ,drill using the rope with the handcuff knot (wich is very labor intensive)and try the hose like vesrescue explained that is a good drill and my choice due to the fact that you could keep the fire knocked until time to remove the ff,if need be get another line in there to keep that fire back from your victim because it will take a little bit of manpower to do this and it takes alot of practice. Another thing to remember is the conditions will not be good when your in there trying to do this rescue if this has to be performed (I hope we only have to perform this in training drills) but you'll find out that this is very labor intensive, and it's not something you can drill once every few months in my eyes,it needs to be drilled on atleast once a month or just go over the process of the drill if you dont have a place to physically do it.Another small thing to rember is practice your knots,and dont overlook the possibility of putting a attic ladder down the hole to get out your victim also.I could go on but I wont,hope this helps,BESAFE!!

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    SEARCH: I carry a 30' piece of 1" tubular webbing. I have a loop at one end and when searching a room, I loop over the interior and exterior door knobs so to control the door as I search the room. Easy to control and feel with a gloved hand. The 30' of webbing also doubles as a hastings harness if I need it.

    RESCUE: Our Company rope bags are 1/2" static kernmantle rope that is taken in by our truck company roof man.

    ESCAPE: NFPA calls for a minimum of 7.5mm. I use the RIT Rescue and Rescue Systems 7.5mm Kevlar over polyester rope, but am considering the new PETZL EXO system. Just remember with an escape system that it really should be a "certified system".

    This website is very helpful with our department's needs. www.allhandsfire.com

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    Personal: 40' of 3/8" kevlar. I have a 8 on a bight and also a carbiner on the loop. If I have to use a tool I will use the loop over it, with proper hand positioning the tool will anchor. The carabiner is in the event I lose the tool or have to wrap an anchor. I am also a FF Survival instructor and have found the loop works better when utilizing a tool as an anchor, then the carabiner. If the carabiner doesn't load properly it can flip when loaded and pull the tool out.

    RIT bags have 200' 1/2" static kernmantle.


    If we have a firefighter down in the hole we basically use either the hoseline method if one is immediately available. If they are conscious or unconscious we have the SCBA converted to the SCBA harness. If they have a gemtor we have them stick the hook up through their jacket. If they are unconscious we often send a person (the lightest) into the hole by having them sit on the rope on the edge and body belay them down. If it's the SCBA we pass a bight through the shoulder straps and retrive it by a hook. This gives you 4 ropes to hoist with. Gemtor, bight goes through the hook in the same manner giving you 4 again. If we have a member down to assist we pull the rope out, send it back down with a loop and they basically sit on the rope in the same manner as he/she went down and we hoist them back up. This is only 2 "ropes" to pull, so that is why you don't want to send a beefy guy down.

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