1. #1
    EJR
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    Default Rural vs Suburban vs Urban

    I am having difficulty in understanding how they determine the category you fall into when it comes to rural, suburban, and/or urban...

    Do they just look at a population figure?
    Do they use a population per square mile figure?
    Or do they have some other formula (that probably makes the IRS Code look easy )?

    Thanks, EJR
    Eric J. Rickenbach ("EJR")
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    www.rescuetechs.com
    ejr@rescuetechs.com

    If there is no patient, it isn't a rescue. If you can't do patient care, you can't be a rescue. You are just a bunch of people with a tool.

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    Population density. <500/sq mi is rural, >2000/sq mi is urban. It may have been altered to 2500, but the only line that makes a real difference is rural vs suburban. Most urban/suburban priorities are identical except urban has Rescue Trucks as Priority 1. Training is almost identical, same with equipment.

    Mainly because most suburbans are becoming urbans with growth.

    "What's a dazzling urbanite like you doing in a rustic setting like this?"

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    Last year we were classified as a rural community, eventhough we are hardly rural. 8 road miled from Downtown Pittsburgh. We were denied an SCBA grant last year. Does this designation rural vs suburban figure in to that in any way? and How can we dispute this automatic designation if ti occurs this year??

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    Yes, if you click what they think to be the wrong thing it pops open a text box to state why you think you aren't what they say you are.

    Open space is calculated into the mix also, so it's not just population density, but very few cross based on the open space designations. Has happened though.

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    In the help (I think that's where I saw it) it mentions population density, # of buildings over 4 stories, open space, water system, etc. We keep getting classified as urban by the grant and we keep explaining why we aren't, we are sub-urban. It's just part of the never ending grant process.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Default Small Urban?

    OK, I understand the <500 in a square mile is rural concept. My City has probably 650-700 per square mile, but we're only 5 square miles. Should I bump things up a notch or just stay rural?

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    Rural/Suburban doesn't have many differences, and besides they're just guidelines posted in the PG for priorities for each. If you're not truly 'rural' by composition then suburban may be better depending on what you're going for. Plus at 600+ you're suburban anyway. Bringing the other stats into it you wouldn't be competitive for a brush truck anyway. The application may stick you in urban depending on the other numbers too, but as I mentioned urban/suburban don't have many differences either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 298lieut
    Last year we were classified as a rural community, eventhough we are hardly rural. 8 road miled from Downtown Pittsburgh. We were denied an SCBA grant last year. Does this designation rural vs suburban figure in to that in any way? and How can we dispute this automatic designation if ti occurs this year??
    John, that's funny because Munhall is classified urban.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chief47
    OK, I understand the <500 in a square mile is rural concept. My City has probably 650-700 per square mile, but we're only 5 square miles. Should I bump things up a notch or just stay rural?
    Chief, is 5 square miles your entire coverage area or is it a city within a larger coverage area? Take the total population (2000 census) in your total coverage area, and divide it by the number of square miles you cover.

    When the dust settles, listen to Brian not me!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENG5TRK
    John, that's funny because Munhall is classified urban.
    I think, given our small area and low population, despite being sandwiched between the larger communities it bumps us to rural.

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    EJR
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    Quote Originally Posted by BC79er
    Population density. <500/sq mi is rural, >2000/sq mi is urban.
    BC79,

    Is there anywhere that this is in "official writing"?
    Eric J. Rickenbach ("EJR")
    FF/EMT/Instructor
    Rehrersburg (Berks County), PA
    www.rescuetechs.com
    ejr@rescuetechs.com

    If there is no patient, it isn't a rescue. If you can't do patient care, you can't be a rescue. You are just a bunch of people with a tool.

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    Nope. They use HUD's definitions. I know it sounds hard to believe that the government would agree to one way to measure something, but every now and again things make sense.

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