Thread: Scott Rit-Pak

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    Default Scott Rit-Pak

    I looking into the Scott Rit-pak, and just wondered if any one has one in use. The picture in the Scott catalog does not really do it justice to explain all the features. I am looking for some better pictures, or at least some better information as to what features the pack really has. Also I have not been able to get an idea on price yet, can any one help me on that.

    thanks

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    Default RIT Pak

    We just recently got them on all our quints and the rescue. Essentially they are a 4500 lb bottle on a simple frame in a duffel bag. In the long pocket on each side are a high-pressure hose that fits the RIT fitting on the new air packs, and a low pressure hose that will fit a standard Scott regulator.

    ...that's a bad description - what I meant was that the HP hose is one side and the LP on the other.

    So essentially, you open the bag, turn the bottle valve on, find your buddy, decide whether you want to refill their bottle or switch over to breathing off the RIT pack.

    AFAIK, we haven't used these at an incident, but we have been training with them. Functionally we haven't had any problem with them, but they do take some work to make them user-friendly. For example, once you get inside in the dark, there is no way to tell which side is high or low pressure, and the zippers are just normal little things, impossible to find with gloves. A guy in my company who used to be a machinist cut an "H" and and "L" about 4"x4" out of aluminum and clipped these onto appropriate sides. Someone else had an idea to clip on different colored glow sticks, which you would activate before you went inside, about the time you turn on the bottle.

    Bottom line, they seem to work OK, but we haven't really put them through their paces yet. Time will tell. If you get these you absolutely will need to train well and often with it, because it's not easy. That being said, it's better than bringing in a spare SCBA with you.

    No clue how much Scott is getting for these.

    Hope that helps.

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    The high pressure hose is used to add air to the downed members cylinder, not fill it. What takes place when hooked up is the two cylinders equalize. Should the rescuer have 4000 psi in the RIT pack and the rescuee is down to close to zero, hooking the HP hose will bring both cylinders to 2000 psi.

    Other points,

    If the LP hose is attached to the downed members facepiece or LP hose, the Vibra-alert system will not function.

    Should the LP hose and regulator be attached to the downed members facepiece, or the entire facepiece replaced, the regulator should be placed in the Positive Pressure mode first. This is especially true with an unconscious members who may not be able to activate the PP with that first sharp breath. This could be dangerous in a contaminated atmosphere. The other alternative is to turn on the bypass.

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    Quote Originally Posted by E229Lt
    The high pressure hose is used to add air to the downed members cylinder, not fill it. What takes place when hooked up is the two cylinders equalize. Should the rescuer have 4000 psi in the RIT pack and the rescuee is down to close to zero, hooking the HP hose will bring both cylinders to 2000 psi.

    Other points,

    If the LP hose is attached to the downed members facepiece or LP hose, the Vibra-alert system will not function.

    Should the LP hose and regulator be attached to the downed members facepiece, or the entire facepiece replaced, the regulator should be placed in the Positive Pressure mode first. This is especially true with an unconscious members who may not be able to activate the PP with that first sharp breath. This could be dangerous in a contaminated atmosphere. The other alternative is to turn on the bypass.
    Question for you LT.,

    If your standard air paks are 2216 PSI and your RIT pak is 4500 PSI, if the 2216 PSI bottle is only down to say 1500 PSI, how will they equalize? I guess my real question is can you use a 4500 PSI (60 min) RIT air pak with a 2216 PSI (30 min). Both paks are the new Scott NXG2. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by E229Lt
    The high pressure hose is used to add air to the downed members cylinder, not fill it. What takes place when hooked up is the two cylinders equalize. Should the rescuer have 4000 psi in the RIT pack and the rescuee is down to close to zero, hooking the HP hose will bring both cylinders to 2000 psi.

    Whoops - bad wording on my part. Thanks, Lt.

    As for HH's question, we use the RIT pack with our 2216 packs - there is a relief valve (in the RIT fitting, I think) that pops open if the RIT pack brings the original pack back to a certain level. I don't know off the top of my head if the valve operates at 2216 or a lower pressure.
    Last edited by upstater; 03-17-2006 at 05:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HalliganHook111

    If your standard air paks are 2216 PSI and your RIT pak is 4500 PSI, if the 2216 PSI bottle is only down to say 1500 PSI, how will they equalize? I guess my real question is can you use a 4500 PSI (60 min) RIT air pak with a 2216 PSI (30 min). Both paks are the new Scott NXG2. Thanks.
    In the case you brought up, it would fill the low pressure bottle up to approximately 2200 pounds. After it reaches that pressure, there is a blow off valve that will open. You will hear it. At that time you can turn off the RIT bottle. We just bought 2 identical set ups and use them with 45 minute / 4500psi NXG2 packs. There are 2 reasons that I know this is the case. First, we asked the same question of the salesman and then we tried it to see how it worked. As far as the price, we paid $2,600 for each set up. That included the 60 minute bottle, high pressure connection hoses, low pressure hose and MMR, AV3000 face piece and the bag & frame. We have not had to use it at a fire scene but train the the living hell out if it and I have heard no complaints.

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    We just got issued them and like Yankee said, train every tour on them. My initial concerns are that the device is full of a lot of options to decide on when your blind, hot and stressed. Don't get me wrong, we need each component but it's new and will take some getting used to. I also worry about the regulator exposed like it is towards the end of the pak.

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