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  1. #1
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    Default Vehicle Stabilization system suggestions

    Looking at getting a new stabilization system. Getting a sales demo here is hard.
    What do you find the best bang for the buck. I am currently looking at the Kodiak system, but I know there are lots out there.


  2. #2
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    You'll probably get lots of opinions.....and here is mine.

    For lowest cost, Zmag. They are basically metal foot pads and metal ends that you fit 4x4's into. Very adjustable, very economical.

    My Squad went with Rescue42 system. Everything in 1 and no 4x4's to carry.

    I've used both in classes and both performed well.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  3. #3
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    Rescue 42 #1 in strenght, safety, versatility and are extremly fast and easy to deploy.
    My dept bought 8 sets, we tested a number of different brands for about a year and it won a majority vote by a land slide over all other systems.
    Zmags are good if you have a very limited budget, but you still have to carry different sizes of 4x4 cribbing to connect them together where telescopic is easily the way to go and very compact.
    Contact me directly for more in depth info about testing, results etc.

  4. #4
    Forum Member IronsMan53's Avatar
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    One of our local rescue engines carry the Nightmare Struts from Junkyard Dog.

    I actually got some hands on time with them yesterday and to tell you the truth they are very good struts. Each strut is carried in one piece with a bag on the strut carrying your tips and straps. There is even a picket attached to pin the base. I believe the guys on the engine said the set sold for around $1200 for four struts.
    I can't believe they actually pay me to do this!!!

    One friend noted yesterday that a fire officer only carries a flashlight, sometimes prompting grumbling from firefighters who have to lug tools and hoses.
    "The old saying is you never know how heavy that flashlight can become," the friend said.
    -from a tragic story posted on firefighterclosecalls.com

  5. #5
    Forum Member medicmaster's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Another vote for Rescue 42

    We recieved our Rescue 42 struts in November and have been very happy with them. We used them several times for training and everyone was impressed with how easy they were to set up, and how solid they were. We finally used them on an accident about a month ago, and now I can't imagine not having them.

    Being made out of carbon fiber, they are lighter than the steel struts we looked at, are non-conductive, and seem to be very durable.
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  6. #6
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    We got rescue jacks they are great. You can stabalize anything with them. We have been training on a tracter with them. They hold perfect. No movement. You get a car on its side and set these up there is no way to tip it. Full car stabalisation in under 3 minutes with a well trained crew. You can also lift with them. We did a full roof removal on a car that was upsde down. The only problem with them is the pickets, and stakes that they come with are junk. You will bend them the first time you use them. We just made our own out of a heavier steel. They have a lot of differant kits for differant budgets but if you can afford it get the expensive on it comes with a lot of extra chains and hooks its worth the money.

  7. #7
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    ARS Struts, former Rescue 42 steel struts.
    Our guys like em.

    www.arsrescue.com

  8. #8
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    FYI medicmaster, Rescue 42 are not carbon fiber.

    Also, ARS struts are a ripoff of Rescue 42.

  9. #9
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    Spokanerep,Better go back and do your homework.The new Rescue42 Telecrib struts ARE MOST CERTAINLY composite,and I suspect they ARE carbon fibre.They are certainly NOT steel although the tried and true steel version is still available.I invite you to go to Rescue42.com to check for yourself.One needs to be very careful on these forums to make statements of fact on equipment unless you research it first.Looks like MM's got you on this one. T.C.
    Last edited by Rescue101; 04-12-2006 at 08:33 AM.

  10. #10
    Forum Member TimatRescue42's Avatar
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    Hey Guys,

    While I tend to take a back row seat here as a manufacturer (unless I speak up as a Fireman), I thought I’d better step in and clear up a couple of things. It’s getting a bit hot in here…

    Yes, the new Rescue 42 TeleCribs are made of an advanced composite material. But they are not Carbon Fiber. They started out as Carbon Fiber, but I switched the fiber to a different mix of “super” fibers (sorry, it’s a secret) because Carbon conducts electricity, and I wanted to make non-conductive struts to help protect rescuers from hot wires in hybrids, machinery, and structural rescue.

    We still have some old “signpost” type steel struts, but we keep them primarily to support departments who have our old system. Frankly, there is no reason I can think of to want our old steel struts over our composite struts. The composite struts are 4 times stronger, lighter, don’t rust, etc.

    I hope that clears things up.

    Thanks, Tim
    www.rescue42.com

  11. #11
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    TC, I never said they werent composite, just that they are not carbon fiber. But then again, what do I know

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up Z - mags

    The Z mags are the best bet. They are very simple and easy to use. One person can stabilize a vehicle in a matter of minutes. Saves time and manpower.
    My Dept has used them for years and are very happy with them.

  13. #13
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    Rescue 42 has my vote. Nice to be able to call up a manufacter with a question and talk to the person that owns the company.

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    Malahat VFD has been using the ZMags for about 4 years now to great success, mostly in the training role, but they have been deployed on a couple of field ops. I like them anyhow. (that might have something to do with me doing much of the research on them to begin with )
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

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  15. #15
    Forum Member rescue133lt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by badtude20
    The Z mags are the best bet. They are very simple and easy to use. One person can stabilize a vehicle in a matter of minutes. Saves time and manpower.
    My Dept has used them for years and are very happy with them.
    ZMags are the best bet, seriously?? I'm sure that they are cheap and easy to use, but better than an adjustable length strut like Rescue42 or Res-Q-Tek or even Paratech? I find that hard to believe.

    We use Res-Q-Tek, but are considering switching to Rescue42 for the light-weight design. Basically the same idea.
    Lt. John Kaltenbach
    Mifflin Fire - Rescue 133
    Gahanna, OH

    "Vermögen bevorzugt das tapfere!"

  16. #16
    Forum Member Rescue101's Avatar
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    S-rep,Looks like I also stand corrected,hehe. You know the old saying of looks like duck,walks like duck? Difference being this is an "epoxy"duck.Oh well,a little humility never hurt anyone,especially me.But I'll see if I can catch you napping on another occasion. T.C.

  17. #17
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    We use our prospan trench shores witht he vehicle stabilization kit. http://www.prospanshoring.com/ They don't work as easy as some of the others (because they are heavy) but storage is an issue and they give us trench and collapse capabilities also.
    For us it makes more sense to have a tool that can do wrecks, trench and collapse, then limit ourselves with a one use tool.

  18. #18
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    Smile

    Rescue 42, with out a doubt. We have 8 sets of composites and one set of metal. No more 4x4, 2x4 to carry, they're light, easy to use, quick to set up, and strong. We also have a set of Air Shore's, we keep them on our ladder truck along with a set of rescue 42's. Nothing againts Z-mags, Ive met the inventor and they are a great system that I've seen other depts modified. We just didn't have the room to carry all those 4x4's in different sizes. Great system just not practical for our dept. just my 2 cents

  19. #19
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  20. #20
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    brozt316
    When are you going to use it?
    It looks like it has never been broke in

    I see many uses with the eyes in it, but what I haven't figured is the red, white, and blue strips.
    Are they looks or are they marking a location?
    Last edited by LeeJunkins; 08-02-2006 at 10:57 PM.
    http://www.midsouthrescue.org
    Is it time to change our training yet ?

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