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  1. #21
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    Exclamation New Name, Same Dummy

    Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately, we don't have too many old pump operators to latch onto around the station, but I will keep my eyes open. After actually running the engine at a fire scene, I was surprised that I remembered and didn't mess up (at least while anyone was looking.)

    The IFSTAT manual is okay, better than what we received at the fire academy. Now, I usually just pull the engine out onto the ramp and start flowing water out of the back of the station when I get the chance.

    I still would rather ride in the jumpseat!

    Thanks again

    By the way, have any of you every lost your password, reset it, and the one Firehouse.com gives to you doesn't work? That is why I had to change the log in name.

    Seltz


  2. #22
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    Default where

    Where can I find this book?? I've looked all over with no luck!

    Quote Originally Posted by FyredUp
    Seltzer27e....

    I agree with much of what was said...read the books. By the way one of thebest for understanding nozzles and hose and lfows in a book called "Firestream Mangaement" by Dave Fornell.

    But I also agree with latch onto the best pump operator on your FD and learn from him.

    Determine your FD's hose sizes and flows required and make yourself a cheat sheet.

    Good luck,

    FyredUp

  3. #23
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    N. Ridgeville, Ohio
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    Default

    I know that it is minimal, but what is that actual formula for 5" friction loss?
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

  4. #24
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WaterbryVTfire View Post
    This is what you should do...

    1) Read the book...
    2) Put it back on the shelf
    3) Find the oldest pump operator you know, then work them. They can give you more background on the whats, whens, wheres, and whys, then most books ever will.

    Just my "narrow minded" opinion
    No truer words have ever been written!!!!!!

  5. #25
    Forum Member FDAIC485's Avatar
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    Nov 2006
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    Default

    If you are a big preconnect department just learn all your basic pump pressures for each set-up. Makes life really easy when you have a job.

    Easiest cheat that I found for 2 1/2 is the "drop ten" method.

    Example 350 gpm through 100 feet.

    350 divided by 10 = 35

    35-10= 25 psi FL per 100 feet
    I believe them bones are me. Some say we are born into the grave. I feel so alone, gonna end up a big ol' pile a them bones

    -J. Cantrell

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Default

    As much as I dislike being stuck on the pump, I really like the challenge of pump op's and truly understanding what is going on. Anyone can set the pump and flow water but do they know their friction loss, how many gpm's they're flowing and how to maximize their pumping capabilities If you want some simple to use fire ground applications, contact me flyntstone@gmail.com

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Smile Pumping Tips

    Agreeing with everyone who posted before me, I've got a few tips of my own,

    *Talk to ALL pump operators, optimally the older experienced guys, but just talk to all of them, find out everyone's little tricks and use your own common sense and practice to see which one's work for you and which ones are repeated amongst all of them. Every pump operator has input and tips, and each one, I can guaratee, will teach you something the one before didn't. Even if it's a similar concept but phrased differently to make you see things differently.

    *Memorize all your numbers, PSIs, GPMs, formulas etc. so they become second nature. It will make pumping SO much less stressful in stressful situations.

    *PRACTICE. As many said before. HOWEVER, practice everything. Practice things that there are a 1/100 chance of happening. Practice overcoming obstacles. That way if something happens, you can stare the obstacle in the face, fix it and laugh at it rather than get frantic. Another tip is to take new guys out. They need the practice pulling lines, etc. It gives you an opportunity to have them pull different lines, multiple lines, charge a deck gun, establish a water supply, etc. And since they need the practice, they SHOULDN'T mind reracking the hose and going for a few more evolutions.

    *I'm not sure about the author or even publishing date, but I've got a handed down "Fire Service Hydraulics" book from probably the 80s that has alot of useful information in it. But like so many have said before, this should be studied ALONG with tons and tons of practice.

    Good Luck & Remember the MOST important role of the Driver/Operator...TO GET THE CREW TO THE SCENE SAFELY!

  8. #28
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm surprised to read the posts stating that the IFSTA manual is "over the top" or over complicated. To me, it's one of the most simplistic publications on fire pumps I've ever read, especially compared to some of the older stuff out there.

    Look at using the rule of hands. This is good for 2.5" & 3". You might be able to use it on 1.75" hose to.
    You can. Fingers 1-5, 100-200 gpm in 25 gpm increments, and all labeled 12 psi.

  9. #29
    Forum Member ThNozzleman's Avatar
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    Default

    I know that it is minimal, but what is that actual formula for 5" friction loss?
    You use the same forumula, "FL = (C)(Q squared)(L)", and the coefficient for five inch hose.

    I haven't seen it mentioned, but the best way to figure friction loss is to set your stuff up and test it with an accurate flowmeters and pressure gauges. Even the best set of formulas is basically an educated guess.

  10. #30
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    Upstate, SC
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    Easiest cheat sheet I've ever used is coloured electrical tape. Since most preconnects stay the same length and use the same nozzle, the pressures for those lines are constant. Our preconnects are individually coloured, so on the pressure gauge, we place a small coloured piece of electric tape at the pressure each preconnect should operate at. The colours of tape correspond to the colours of the individual lines. It really helps for those 3am brain farts and also makes it easier for new guys to figure out what to do.

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