1. #1
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    Default 2 Questions...plow lines and fiberglass handles...

    Ok, this is what happens on a rainy day when I have too much time on my hands, thinking of stuff between errands:

    1) When a plow line is made by a dozer, do they go back and fill it in later?

    Just seems to me, especially with some of the larger plows I've seen pics of recently, you can really re-design terrain...especially with how water gets channeled.

    So I'm curious if it's a "after the season" type activity to go back and fill in the trench.

    2) Are fiberglass handles common?

    I'm slowly upgrading my home tools to fiberglass...just something about the "firm" feel I prefer, and most of my newer rakes, shovels, etc aren't designed for the wood handles to be replaced anyway.

    I do still use by wood-handled rake when tending the brush piles...afraid I'd melt the fiberglass Just curious if handline crews still use mostly wood, or fiberglass.

    My fire company's wildland tools are all wood or metal; though all our axes & mauls are either fiberglass or the next replacement handle will be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalmatian190
    Ok, this is what happens on a rainy day when I have too much time on my hands, thinking of stuff between errands:

    1) When a plow line is made by a dozer, do they go back and fill it in later?

    Just seems to me, especially with some of the larger plows I've seen pics of recently, you can really re-design terrain...especially with how water gets channeled.

    So I'm curious if it's a "after the season" type activity to go back and fill in the trench.
    Yes to both...depends on terrain and area of course...any road plowed on a slope must be waterbarred to prevent a ditch from forming I am sure you know. Sometimes they will drag slash over it too. When the enviro wackos get really crazy you might have to go back and throw dirt, bury, rough up, or otherwise cover any saw cut logs, etc. evidence that man was there. Often it is done on the fire while all the people are still there, P codes are still open, etc. Sure that takes away from other fires but that's how it is sometimes. If the forest has to come back later and do it on their own it will take more of their own money.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dalmatian190
    2) Are fiberglass handles common?

    I'm slowly upgrading my home tools to fiberglass...just something about the "firm" feel I prefer, and most of my newer rakes, shovels, etc aren't designed for the wood handles to be replaced anyway.

    I do still use by wood-handled rake when tending the brush piles...afraid I'd melt the fiberglass Just curious if handline crews still use mostly wood, or fiberglass.

    My fire company's wildland tools are all wood or metal; though all our axes & mauls are either fiberglass or the next replacement handle will be.
    We do have one or two fiberglass Pulaskis laying around but as long as we go to large fires and exchange items such as hose, tees, tools, clothes, etc. then those items are going to remain pretty much standardized on our engines at least. That means wood handle tools, cotton jacket hose, lightweight (low bid) clothes. They are exchange items.

    Birken

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    Here in Colorado, dozers are very rarely used... in fact I can't think of ANY fire I've been on where they were used... this is mostly due to concerns about the environment and frankly, they wouldn't be very useful in most of the terrain we're dealing with. I was out on a recent grass fire (1200 acre) where a front end loader and dozer were borrowed by a homeowner from a gravel pit to try to save a restraunt which was surrounded by a 4 foot tall fence of tires! With 60 MPH winds we thought the restraunt was gone once those tires caught but thanks to the heavy equipments ability to bury the burning tires it was saved.

    As for fiberglass handles, never seen em here. I've never used em but call me old fashioned I like the feel and weight of wood.

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    Well I'm not too familiar with plow lines, plows are mostly a south eastern area thing, most of the western states use dozers with front mounted blades. I would assume that plow lines are dealt with similarly to dozer lines which BirkenVogt summed up pretty well. In recent years there has been a push to use BAER teams (Burned Area Environmental Recovery), these are used on very large fires and deal with erosion control, reseeding, removal of firelines etc. On smaller fires this is usually handled by local crews and the work is much less complex.

    Regarding the fiberglass handles, I've used a few and they are popular with some crews. Personally I prefer wood handles, but there are many who really like the fiberglass, they seem to hold up well and I don't think heat is anymore of an issue with fiberglass than wood.

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    Plow lines here in our farmland area are most often achieved by calling the local farmers to attend with a cultivator. They often send another family member with slip tanks of water. If we are really lucky, they will send the women with snacks and drinking water.
    Still using wood handled tools.
    IACOJ
    If you are willing to teach;
    I am willing to learn.

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    If we are really lucky, they will send the women with snacks and drinking water.

    LOL!

    Most of our trucks carry bottled gatorade & water. At some point in my life, I'm sure I'll see the day carrying some granola bars is just as common for a quick "boost" at a long call!

    Coffee & Donuts just doesn't do it for me.

    ===================
    Last I knew my state (Connecticut) did have at least one dozer kept ready during fire season on a trailer for the state's crew to deploy...I've never heard of it being *used* though I know Massachusetts does have a plow for their dozer, I'm not sure if Connecticut does.
    Last edited by Dalmatian190; 04-18-2006 at 06:02 PM.

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    US Gov't MREs, cost about $8 each, but like 2000 calories, a whole meal in a bag and really don't taste all that bad any more. All apparatus should have them

    Birken

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    All the tool on my crew have plastic/fiberglass handles. They are a bit heavier, but work better in the long run. Part of the reason for our crew having them is due to the fact that all our tools are crew made. We tried experimenting with wood handles, but those tools only lasted a couple of shifts. The only down side to the fiberglass/plastic handles is that if you some how manage to break or burn one, they cant be exchanged in fire camp. They are tough and I have yet to see one fail or break. Some of our handles have been in service a couple of seasons on the shot crew.

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