1. #1
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    Default I got injured at a call today

    Today we had a brush fire and I was the driver and pump operator for our tanker pumper. The bruch fire was a small fire off the side of a 4 lane highway that runs through our town. When I pulled up on scene the IC was just pulling up also. Te first thing I asked was for him to have somebody cone the road to protect me from traffic. Needless to say I went on to star getting the hose line off the truck due to lack of manpower. Then I went around the truck to get ready to put the pump into gear and I noticed that the road had not been coned off. Then the IC called on the radio and asked me to charge the hose line. I had to get into the truck to answer him. When I stepped back to exit the truck I slipped on the step and fell on my back into the highway. I looked to my right to see a car approaching(this is a 55mph rd.)Knowing I was in pain and may have had a back injury I still rolled out of the way and next to the truck. I had to have a bystander go get me help. Needless to say I only bruised my tailbone. My question is we only have diamond plate steps...should there be some other type of tred on these steps to help prevent us from slipping?????
    Stay Safe and live long

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    Can't help you on an alternative to diamond plating. About you injury, all I can say is document it. Make sure a copy of the injury is in you file.
    "My friends, watch out for the little fellow with an idea." - Tommy Douglas 1961.

    Tender 9 - old, slow, ugly, cantankerous, reliable!

    All empires fall, you just have to know where to push

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    More common now is diamond plate steps that have holes punched in them. The rough edges of the wholes protrude, giving you more of a non-slip surface. No idea whether that would have helped in your situation or not.

    I'm assuming your were in proper PPE (per your department standards) at the time?
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Yes our sop is if you are the driver and pump operator that you have on a minimal of your bunker pants and boots. I stopped by the station today to try to look at the truck and see if there might be somthing that would make the steps safer. I did notice that both the steps are even as far as size and how close they are to the truck. After looking I also noticed that you can only fit about 1/4 of your booted foot on them at a time. I am thinking maybe some size improvement might help a lil bit. I also noticed that on our other trucks the diamond plate has these steal inserts in them with a very agressive tred. May be another option. My goal is to be sure that this does not happend to anyone else as I was lucky to not break any bones or suffer any major injuries. As far as documentaton goes I did go to the ER via ambulance after the incident and I have already been contacted by workers comp. I greatly appreciate any other suggestions. Here is a pic of the tanker I am speaking of, it is the tanker pumper 317. http://cnyfiretrucks.com/st/sauquoit.html
    Stay Safe and live long

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    There is also another option, on our aerial ladder steps we had a coating aplied to them to make it slip resistant. It does have some grip.

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    Coatings do work, but it takes away from the diamond plate appearance. As Bones stated, alot of the diamond plate steps now have holes punched in them from the bottom which gives you great slip resistance. I looked at the picture and it looks like that second step is quite a reach besides being narrow. Hope you were using the hand rail at the time (maybe using a better grip will help in the future). Bring this incident up at your meeting so that everyone will know how much of a hazard this step is. Be careful and I hope you have a full recovery. Take care and stay safe!!
    Last edited by THEFIRENUT; 04-20-2006 at 04:07 AM.
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

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    Thats one of those times that handheld radio's for each pump operator is crucial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sodakfinest
    Thats one of those times that handheld radio's for each pump operator is crucial.
    I'd have to agree with that. Each of our trucks have a min. of 3 (most have 4) portable radios on them. That allows one radio for each person on board. Having that portable radio would have prevented your injury, in this case, because you were injured when you exited the truck after having to answer the radio. This is not to say that someone else might not slip simply getting out when they arrive or even at the station. I would consider something like what the others have suggested, what I know of is called Diamondback Tread. I will attempt to attach a picture below.. I guess you will see if I was successful!

    Well... that picture doesn't really do justice to how the tread really looks. Here is a better look Diamondback Tread Picture
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by FTMPTB15; 04-22-2006 at 02:04 AM. Reason: That pic doesn't do justice!
    Do it because you love it, not because you love being seen doing it.

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    Two tips to help with traffic:

    1. If space is limited, CLOSE THE DAMN ROAD, PERIOD. Use your apparatus, park it across the lane(s) of travel, being very careful to angle the pump panel AWAY from the direction of travel of the traffic. Remember, the life safety pecking order here is YOU, US, THEM. Let the traffic stop and wait.

    And as far as your IC or the local LEO's are concerned with not wanting to stop traffic, comprimise with them. Tell them that when they supply the appropriate traffic control (I.E. Officers to direct traffic or whatever) THEN you will move your rig to open up for partial traffic flow.

    2. If you are operating on a large highway with multiple lanes, again, ALWAYS ALWAYS ALWAYS remember to angle the pice so that the pump panel is facing AWAY from the flow of traffic. NEVER PARK PARALLEL TO THE FLOW OF TRAFFIC.

    WHEN OPERATING ON HIGH SPEED ROADWAYS, ALWAYS REMEMBER, "GEOMETRY IS YOUR FRIEND." PERPENDICULAR IS BETTER!
    "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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    You could find a guy that does Line-X or any other kind of spray on lining to spray a rough section on each of your steps. It should almost feel like sandpaper and will have a good grip and with it being black, I don't think it would ruin the appearance of the truck.

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    I want to thank everyne for there wishes and advise. I went to give the chhief my release therother day and he was just taking the new chargers for portables on the trucks out of there boxes. Wow real good timing for that.
    Stay Safe and live long

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    1. If space is limited, CLOSE THE DAMN ROAD, PERIOD. Use your apparatus, park it across the lane(s) of travel, being very careful to angle the pump panel AWAY from the direction of travel of the traffic. Remember, the life safety pecking order here is YOU, US, THEM. Let the traffic stop and wait.

    Rule One you go we go! the fire is not your fault...and you did not create the emergency...it is however your respocibilty to make the scene safe how ever you do that..closig the road to traffic flow in a low-manpower time is a great idea. hope a lesson was leaned...and hope you get feeling better.

    www.hancockvfd.com
    Lead, Follow, or Get out of the Way!

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    Default Slipping problem

    Get you some of the turtle tile's with the aggresive coating and screw them to the treadplate, it works great even if it is wet! You will never slip again.
    Smokediver

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