Thread: Whats Missing

  1. #1
    firefighter7160
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    Default Whats Missing

    If the Fire Chief was to walk up to you and say,"were going to get a new Engine, what would you like to see on it that the other trucks dont have". What would you have to say.

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    Firefighters!!! lol I crack myself up...

    No, seriously... our last set of engines came in with Class "A" foam systems and they are working out great. So I would have to say either a regular Class "A" system or if you're feeling froggy (and have a little extra cash) you could get a Compressed Air Foam System (CAFS).
    I can't believe they actually pay me to do this!!!

    One friend noted yesterday that a fire officer only carries a flashlight, sometimes prompting grumbling from firefighters who have to lug tools and hoses.
    "The old saying is you never know how heavy that flashlight can become," the friend said.
    -from a tragic story posted on firefighterclosecalls.com

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    Federal Q!!
    FTM - PTB

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    For me, I'd go with the following:

    1.) Some sort of exhaust brake, even if the GVW doesn't dictate that you need one per NFPA. Yes, true Jakes are better, but the exhaust brakes offered on the smaller diesels are better than not having one.

    2.) I'd agree with the Class A foam. I'd even consider having the capability for Class B on board, and making sure your Class B will handle hydrocarbons and polar solvents.

    3.) Loads of reflective striping, front, back, chevron, whatever. Fairly cheap way to increase visibility and safety of your folks.

    4.) Consider dual tank to pump line, larger diameter, especially if you're running a big pump with a bigger tank. Use that pump to full capacity.

    5.) LED lighting. Often you can save the cost difference by not needing a load manager.

    I'll probably think of more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BVFD1983
    Federal Q!!

    I'll second that!
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

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    raised roof !

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    Load managers are still recommended with all LED lighting, they aren't that much in cost when compared to the issues that come up when not having one.

    We put Class A(25gal) & Class B (65gal) on a CAFS rescue-pumper we bought in 2003, and after talking to several foam people they said that B isn't worth adding. Class A is going to be 98% of your fires on average, and those few Class B fires will be smaller and the Class A CAFS can take it out. Any large Class B fires and you'll need a foam pumper. 65 gallons won't be enough to handle the problem, so the money is better spent on a small trailer to hold a load of Class B buckets. Most foam systems have drafting capabilities, which also makes refilling the tanks really easy. We dropped CAFS in the Quint we bought last year, and we're building twin pumpers with only Class A CAFS this year.

    For the pumpers the change will be to have the full height body in the rear, giving us coffin storage up top instead of dead space.

    Make sure you get enough HP/torque under the hood. If you are going to be building a 20 year truck that's going to spend 10 years or more as the front line piece get the motor a size or two bigger. We could have gotten away with 450HP in the R-P, but we went 500 to ensure there is no strain at all on it. The heavy rescue from 2003 got a 475 since it will be spending it's entire service life as front line. Quint was 515 for the same reason.

    Raised roof for sure. I'm 6' and those extra inches are a God send.

    Speedlays are really nice. It adds a little length to the truck but repacking the lines is really simple and easy. I know some stations that have them that pack spare hose in the trays, then strap them together to put off to the side so when they have a job they can just drop in the new pack.

    Pics:
    www.firegraphics.org/cvfd-pierce.htm
    www.communityvfd.com

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    I would make sure of a Class A foam system of some type. Screwed up on our new one by not specifying it.

    (I'm surprised....No one has said "a brand that begins with the letter P!)

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    BC79 makes some good points, but we all have differing opinions. After listening to a recent foam presentation (and even by a guy that doesn't make or sell foam!), I think Class B is still a viable choice, especially if some of the alternative fuels that are all the rage come into play. Sure, with an onboard system you won't have the ability to put out a tanker fire, but you could likely control a car fire with a fuel tank rupture. The trailer concept is right on, we have a neighbor likely getting an ethanol plant - they're looking at a trailer for their foam needs.

    I'm not looking for a fight, and I also agree if you have the funding - go for big motor. However, a good portion of our area simply can't put that kind of money into a rig, and for most of us - the trucks we replace at 15 or 20 years aren't even hitting 30,000 miles. And please - if you go for a bigger motor, put a pump in that can use that power. The added cost isn't that much more in the big picture, and maybe in the next 20 years you'll need the extra pumping capacity.

    The suggestion of the speedlays is a good one. We've ordered our last two units with spare trays, so there's a pre-loaded tray for each speeday waiting in the station to be reloaded. We're beginning to realize that the sooner we can get the volunteers free from a call, the more likely they are to run the calls. Yes, hose needs to be washed, reloaded and so forth, but it can wait until someone doesn't have to be at work.

    I think CAFS is good stuff, but a lot of departments think it's the end-all solution to firefighting. If you are unwilling to put in the time training with it, and learn the realities of using it, you'll hate it and trash talk it like lots of folks seem to around here that bought it and found that it didn't meet their (unrealistic) expectations. Get some demos on it, go to a CAFS class if you can, and then decide if its right for you.

    By the way - darn sharp rigs BC79.
    Last edited by npfd801; 04-21-2006 at 09:45 PM.

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    Less than 170,000 miles.

    Other than that: LED lighting, Enclosed cab, A/C, More compartment space, IFS, and a front bumper preconnect just off the top of my head.
    Last edited by RareRamAir; 04-21-2006 at 01:52 PM.

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    as many compartments as you can get , and low step in hieght and adequate step depth for the cab doors. Also seating for at least 5 on board cascade and ground lighting.



    just a few i thought of
    engine 163 to command .. tell engine 165 we got it they can take up and return

    engine163 to county fire SEND ME EVERYTHING

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    I'd have to say a CAFS,FOAM PRO or some type of foam system,it seems like CAFS is like highpressure was back in the day,that's what I think every one wants it,that's just my opinion. And they are saying now that you should'nt hesitate to use class A on a B fire,you'll have to keep an eye on it and possibly reapply it that's what weve been told. And I guess some big companies are doing some extensive tests on using class A on B fires ond once the fire is contained go over it with B foam wich would save some companies alot of $$ that's what I've heard. BE SAFE!!

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    A hose bed I can reach from the ground.

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    Roll up doors for the compartments
    Hydraulic ladder rack for more compartment space
    Medical locker inside the jump seat area, if space available

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    A "road noise eliminator" aka stereo system. CD player and XM radio if your lucky. Just throwing it out there.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy4329
    A "road noise eliminator" aka stereo system. CD player and XM radio if your lucky. Just throwing it out there.....
    Thats what you call a Weather Band Radio....just for the folks in the Commission/Board meeting
    Forrest Gregg
    Chief
    Holtville/Slapout
    Fire & Rescue Inc.
    District 10 Director
    AAVFD
    IAFC
    www.holtvilleslapoutfd.org

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    1. Lower Hose bed
    2. CAFS
    3. color digital video system front, rear and sides. Awesome training tool!
    4. more space around the front seats. Maybe its just me (a few of us) but its often difficult to find the seatbelt hole with gear on. Maybe a better reciever side to the seatbelt system.

    We're moving away from the B foam tanks also. We have two engines with 100 gal. each of class A polar solvent foam. If and when we train with it is its only use. As previously stated- not enough to to alot, and a pain to fill as you go. We're speccing out a trailer right now to do all foam ops in our region.

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    rear camera on new aerial truck

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    CAFS

    when we look at replacing the front line engine we might look replacing it with a quint

    I really like the concept of LDH on a reel instead of in a hose bed

    LED lights

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