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  1. #1
    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    Default Midshipmen choose Marines

    Well if this just isn't motivating as *****. How come the press doesn't throw this one out there talking about recruiting. It seems The Corps is turning away good applicants to become Marine officers.



    War in their future, Mids choose Marines

    More Naval Academy seniors are making the Corps their first preference, lately more than it can take

    By Bradley Olson
    Sun reporter
    Originally published March 25, 2006

    When it came time for Jake Dove, a senior at the U.S. Naval Academy, to decide how he would fulfill his required military duty after graduation, there was no question about it: Marine Corps all the way.

    "In my eyes it's a perfect community," said Dove, an Annapolis High School graduate. "The idea of being a platoon leader in charge of guys that have done two, three tours in Iraq already, when I haven't been over there - that's an awesome responsibility. I'm eager to take it on."

    Despite a war that has entered its fourth year with mounting casualties and waning public support, more and more midshipmen at the Annapolis military college are volunteering for the Marines when asked to choose how they will fulfill the five-year commitment required of all academy graduates.

    When the assignments were made official last month for the 992 members of the class of 2006, 209 were placed as officers with the Corps - the most in the school's 161-year history. And more would have done so if there were enough openings: an additional 45 who sought the Marines were assigned to other duty when the allotment was filled.

    Naval aviation remains the most popular choice among midshipmen, but a growing interest in Marine duty - in spite of its dangers - has been under way for several years, even as applications to the academy have dropped sharply in recent years, a development blamed by some on the Iraq war.

    Three years ago, 162 slots were set aside for the Marines and the academy ended up turning away some applicants. The number of slots was increased the next year, to 195, and the Corps drew 207 applicants. Last year the cap was set at 207; more midshipmen were turned away.

    Dove said the threat of being hurt or killed in Iraq is "always in the back of my head, and I'm sure it's the same for everybody going in the Marines."

    "It's a consideration, something you have to prepare yourself for mentally," he said. "But this is the way I want to serve my country and I'm not going to let anything get in the way of what I've always wanted to do, which is to lead men in combat."

    In a recent presentation to a civilian oversight board, Vice Adm. Rodney P. Rempt, the academy's superintendent, said midshipmen are increasingly asking to go to the front lines or "where the action is," so they can "prove themselves."

    "There are many more that want to be Marines than we can take," he said to the academy's Board of Visitors, which includes members of Congress, retired military officials and educators. "There are many more that want to be SEALS than we can take. It's very heartwarming to see the determination of these young people and what they want to do."

    Surveys the academy conducts of midshipmen show that the upturn in Marine interest will continue for the classes of 2007, 2008 and 2009, with more than 300 current plebes declaring their interest in the Marine Corps, more than in surface warfare or submarines.

    More than 650 Marines have been killed since the Iraq war began three years ago this month, but that has not deterred midshipmen from becoming Marines. Academy officials joke that the Marine Corps might have finally eclipsed naval aviation or submarines, both of which were popularized by Hollywood in Top Gun and The Hunt for Red October.

    The appeal of the Marines has stretched beyond the Naval Academy. While the Army and its reserve components have struggled to meet recruiting goals during the Iraq conflict, the Marine Corps has not.

    Most academy officials believe interest is high for patriotic reasons - the phenomenon began not long after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Others, including midshipmen, said the enthusiasm could be part of a common trend in wartime at the nation's service academies, where young students have been eager to bolster their military credentials with combat experience.

    Having a surplus of mids who want to be Marines has been a change from the Vietnam era. In 1968, the Marine Corps failed to meet its quota for the first time in academy history.

    In the 2006 class, 349 mids were assigned to naval aviation as pilots or navigators; 270 chose to "go SWO," academy parlance for working on surface warships; 88 went to subs; 21 will train for the SEALs - the Navy's elite fighting force. Fifteen went to special operations such as explosives disposal, 10 will attend medical school and the rest will fill a variety of military billets, including intelligence, civil engineering and information warfare.

    Midshipmen are asked to list a first, second and third choice for their duty preference. A service board makes the final decision based on the preferences, order of merit or class standing, academic qualifications, physical requirements and the needs of each service branch. The students learned of their assignments in November, and the selections were made official last month in an annual ceremony where the mids find out the specifics of their assignment, such as the ship on which they will serve.

    Sheivon Davis, a 23-year-old sprinter on Navy's women's track team and a graduate of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, said she asked for Marine duty and was surprised that she wasn't selected.

    "I was clearly qualified, but they turned down a lot of qualified people," said Davis, who will become a junior officer on the USS Elrod in Norfolk, Va., after graduation. "I guess it was just God telling me, 'No, Sheivon, you don't want to be in Iraq with bullets flying past your head.'"

    Before 2004, when Rempt responded to the increased interest of midshipmen by asking the Navy and Marine Corps leaders to take more Marine billets from the academy, the Marine Corps had selected about 16 percent of the graduating class. Now it's closer to 20 percent, which academy officials say better mirrors the proportion of Marine Corps officers in the leadership of the combined Navy-Marine service branch.
    Charles Krulak, a former commandant of the Marine Corps, who originally pushed for an increase in Marine billets in the late 1990s, said he was pleased with the change and believed it reflects well on the class of midshipmen, despite an almost 25 percent decline in applications to the academy in recent years.

    "What I'm happy about is that midshipmen want to walk to the sound of the guns," he said, "whether it's on the sea, under the sea, in the air or on the ground. The people who are coming to the Naval Academy want to serve, and they want to be leaders."

    Col. Michael Paulovich, the senior Marine at the academy and director of its Humanities and Social Sciences Division, said he doesn't really have an explanation for the surge, except to emphasize what Marines have always emphasized: fitness, esprit de corps and leadership opportunities for junior officers:

    "That's the steady message that's always out there."

    Paulovich said enthusiasm for serving in the Iraq war also might reflect a strong "spirit of patriotism" among mids who came to the academy in the aftermath of Sept. 11.

    "I was here 20 years ago, and it was all Top Gun and Red October," he said. "We had to work hard to attract high-quality midshipmen" to the Marines.

    Dove and Joe Mihoces, another senior who will become a Marine, said their decision was due in large part to the influence of 1st Lt. Mike Simon, a junior officer and 2003 academy graduate whom they befriended and who recently went to Iraq for a second tour.

    The thrill of being in the action in Iraq or in any combat situation is something he and a lot of people think about, said Dove, 22, but it's not the primary consideration.

    "My father was a paratrooper in Vietnam, and talking to him definitely de-glamorizes what happens out there," he said of combat situations. "It's something that has to be done, and I'd like to be the one that does it. I'd like to be the one that leads Marines in a combat environment."

    Dove and Mihoces will go to the Marine Corps' Basic School at Quantico, Va., for six months. After that, Dove could be deployed and Mihoces will go to flight school in Pensacola, Fla., to join a smaller community of Marine Corps pilots. Although he won't necessarily be leading troops on the ground in Iraq, Mihoces said he is thrilled to be in the Corps.

    "You could take the pilot away from me tomorrow and I would still want to be a Marine," he said.
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

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    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

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  2. #2
    Forum Member pkfd7505's Avatar
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    OOORah Devil Dog!

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    Forum Member gunnyv's Avatar
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    Come on DaSharkie, you can't expect the press to report something that presents the military as anything more than the dead-end route for the small town unemployed of Appalachia.

    I'm constantly amazed-and heartened-by the bravery of the young men and women who go into harm's way, and refuse to play the victim when they are wounded. Last weeks USA Weekend in the sunday paper had a story about 3 amputees who were running marathons and triathlons on their prosthetics.

    http://www.usaweekend.com/06_issues/...y_wounded.html

    Where do these heros come from?

  4. #4
    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnyv
    Where do these heros come from?
    Top, you know as well as I do that the very best of every generation serve their nation.

    They never stop amazing me either.
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

    "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

    www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

  5. #5
    Forum Member 1835Wayne's Avatar
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    The Marine Corps is the best.
    GOODNIGHT CHESTY PULLER!!!!!!!!!!!
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    "Chet, get an inch and a half on that!"

    "Not for fame or reward,Not for place or rank. Not lured by ambition or goaded by necessity. But in simple obedience to duty as they understood it. These men suffered,sacrificed,dared all, and died. Let us never forget our fallen friends."

  6. #6
    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    Just for you Wayne:

    "Artillery brings a sense of sophistication to what would otherwise just be a brawl."
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

    "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

    www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

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    Forum Member 1835Wayne's Avatar
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    Ahhhhhhhhhhhh..............the King of battle...................

    Nothing like the words "Fire for effect"!!
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    I.A.C.O.J. Charter Member
    "Chet, get an inch and a half on that!"

    "Not for fame or reward,Not for place or rank. Not lured by ambition or goaded by necessity. But in simple obedience to duty as they understood it. These men suffered,sacrificed,dared all, and died. Let us never forget our fallen friends."

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber MalahatTwo7's Avatar
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    So it looks like a few more "Sheepdogs" have stepped to the plate.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

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    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

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  9. #9
    Forum Member len1582's Avatar
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    ...and an old 0311 vintage '72-'75 who qualified at the range at P.I. with an M-14 ..

  10. #10
    Forum Member gunnyv's Avatar
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    Here's something new for the "Gun Bunny" From 5/10


    Army Artillery Gets a Makeover
    InsideDefense.com NewsStand | Jen DiMascio | April 25, 2006
    The combination of newly developed precision munitions and precision targeting software will help Army artillery regain its role on future battlefields, the commander of the Artillery School said last week.

    Army artillery, which is embedded in the service’s modular brigade combat teams, has been sidelined by Air Force capabilities, the threat of collateral damage and rules of engagement governing today’s crowded, urban fighting zones, Maj. Gen. David Ralston told Inside the Army after speaking at an April 19 conference sponsored by the Precision Strike Association.

    Artillerymen have “been out there walking patrol, doing patrol,” Ralston said. “That’ll continue now, but they’ll also have the dual mission of being able to fire artillery, because you can do it precisely.”

    Within the next year, the Army will see a change in the way artillery is used.

    “Now we’ve got everything for precision fires. The Air Force really kind of cornered that market for a long time, and they did a great job. But the smallest thing they have is a 500-pound bomb. Now, with a 50-pound warhead on an Excalibur, we can give them with our precision targeting, the same accuracy. We think now we’ll be firing more, because we bring this new asset to the fight,” Ralston said.

    A key component of this new capability is the Army’s Employment of a new program -- the Precision Strike Suite for Special Operations Forces. The software program may be fielded to soldiers in Iraq within the next three months, Ralston said.

    “We got it from the special ops guys. The acronym, of course, is ‘**** off,’” Ralston quipped during his speech.

    The program enables soldiers at the tactical level to precisely locate a time-sensitive target for fires within about five minutes, he said.

    Previously, confirming a target took more time than the Army wanted.

    Even in 2004 and 2005, “mensuration” was performed at the theater level, Ralston said.

    “That is where we come up with a set of grid coordinates, the Air Force takes it, they go through some very long and painful verification and truly turn . . . into a very precise grid that they can attack with certainty. It was done only in theater and it took hours to do, and that’s the best case,” Ralston said. “We said that doesn’t allow you to attack time-sensitive targets, and it doesn’t necessarily help the tactical guy in the field when he needs it.”

    A soldier using PSS-SOF employs the Global Positioning System to find his own location. Then he takes a laser and lases to a target, so he can see the target on grid coordinates and also on a map. PSS-SOF then draws on three-dimensional imagery from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency so the soldier can see whether the target he’s about to shoot is correct. If the location is wrong, that soldier can drag and drop an icon on his computer screen to the correct location so that a precise munition can be called to fire at the target, Ralston said.

    “It’s a great system that is actually very easy to use,” he said, adding that “this is not mensurated targeting, it is near-mensurated. But it is close enough that it will get you ‘precise’ targeting,” defined as targeting the right spot within 10 meters.

    Because it depends on stock imagery that is not updated, the system can’t be used for mobile targets, like tanks. Rather, it is best used to attack buildings where insurgents may be meeting during a specific time, he said.

    PSS-SOF is becoming a program of record for all the services and is being incorporated into the Army’s existing Forward Observer Software, Ralston said.

    The need for such a targeting system was uncovered as Ft. Sill studied what the service needed to use in Iraq, Ralston said.

    “We realized that as we developed these precision munitions, we had to have the ability to do precision targeting,” he said. Combining PSS-SOF with precision munitions the service is fielding or is on the verge of fielding brings precision fires to the “pointy end of the spear.”

    In addition to the munitions piece, the Artillery School at Ft. Sill also started an operational warfare class and a course to train joint fire observers, Ralston said.

    It also plans to use precision munitions -- the unitary portion of the Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System and the Excalibur munition.

    The recently fielded GMLRS provides greater precision with a smaller bang than Air Force firepower, Ralston said, because it fires a 200-pound warhead as opposed to dropping a 500-pound bomb.

    Excalibur, an even smaller munition at 50 pounds, is even better for urban fighting, because it drops nearly vertically over its target, he said.

    Excalibur remains in testing at Yuma Proving Ground, AZ, Ralston said, but he’s hoping that it will be in the field by this time next year. Officials at Ft. Sill have been hoping for an early fielding of the munition, which has been requested by combatant commanders, for more than a year.

    “The testing community said ‘We’re just not sure. Before we put it over in there and use it, let’s make sure that we’re comfortable with it,’” Ralston told ITA.

    Users of the munition are so enthusiastic about Excalibur, they want the munitions in theater even if only six out of 10 of them work, a program official said during the same conference.

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    Now that is some high speed low drag stuff there Gunny!

    The Army will probably let the Corps have it about the year 2100!!!!!!!!!!

    In addition to the munitions piece, the Artillery School at Ft. Sill also started an operational warfare class and a course to train joint fire observers, Ralston said.
    Sounds like ANGLICO doesn't it Gunny?? Pity that the whole pinning the jump wings thing got ANGLICO shut down by the politicians a few years back............

  12. #12
    Forum Member gunnyv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1835wayne2892
    Sounds like ANGLICO doesn't it Gunny?? Pity that the whole pinning the jump wings thing got ANGLICO shut down by the politicians a few years back............
    ANGLICO is back, and has been for a couple of years. From what I understand, 1st (PEN), 2nd (LEJ), and 5th (OKI) ANGLICO are active duty, 3rd and 4th USMCR. ANGLICO can do without that technology what the Army can with it.

    Hot steel on the way warms your heart, doesn't it?

    ANGLICO's back, ready for more
    Submitted by: MCB Camp Lejeune
    Story Identification #: 200371473946
    Story by Lance Cpl. Christopher J. Ohmen


    CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. (July 13, 2003) -- Second Marine Liaison Element reactivated as 2nd Air and Naval Gunfire Liaison Company in a ceremony July 11 in front of the II Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Building.

    It took ANGLICO several years to get approval for reactivation, but when Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Michael W. Hagee signed the reactivation papers, all the Marines in the unit were excited.

    "Being called ANGLICO again is a big thing for former and current Marines in the unit; it is a big source of pride," said Gunnery Sgt. Daniel K. Brown, acting sergeant major, 2nd ANGLICO.

    In 1998 then Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Charles C. Krulak disbanded 1st ANGLICO, based at Camp Pendleton, Calif., and Camp Lejeune's 2nd ANGLICO because he didn't see a need for them, according to Lt. Col. John M. Owens, commanding officer, 2nd ANGLICO, II MEF. The two units then became 1st and 2nd Marine Liaison Element.

    The next commandant, Gen. James L. Jones, reviewed ANGLICO's mission and what it had done in the past and decided it was valuable enough to bring back, according to Owens.

    The mission of ANGLICO is to provide Marine Air Ground Task Force commanders a liaison capability with foreign area expertise to plan, coordinate, employ and conduct radio communications for air, sea and land support fire for joint, allied and coalition forces.

    Marines in this unit give the ground commanders they are attached to immediate access to aircraft, artillery and naval gunfire from the company to the division level, said Owens, most often in joint operations

    "All of the coalition forces know ANGLICO and what the unit does, and (they) have a lot of respect for what it does," said Owens.

    In Operation Iraqi Freedom, the former 2nd Marine Liaison Element Marines supported coalition forces with men and equipment to call for close air support.

    They also supported the Army's 3rd Infantry Division and the British Royal Marine's 3rd Commando Brigade with the ability to call in more than 17 sections of aircraft, including F-14s, F-18s, A-10s, British GR-4s and British Lynx/Gazelle pairs. Their support resulted in the destruction of multiple light-skinned vehicles, artillery pieces, tanks and bunkers.

    "The success ANGLICO had during the war in Iraq was due to the extensive training done with units from the other armed forces," said Owens.

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    Since we are on the military subject, I recently was going through my grandfathers military records, He scored a 238 on Course "A" in USARMY, where does that score rank him?
    FF I
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    Forum Member pkfd7505's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainMikey
    Since we are on the military subject, I recently was going through my grandfathers military records, He scored a 238 on Course "A" in USARMY, where does that score rank him?
    I'm not sure what it means in the Army but if that's the score you got on qual day in the Corps it means that you don't have to wear a pizzabox on your inform.

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    Forum Member 1835Wayne's Avatar
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    One of my best friends in the Corps came to our little battery from 2nd ANGLICO, those guys ROCK.

    They downplayed their role in that article though...........those guys deploy WITH and go in action with all manner of special forces and act as FO's with in depth knowledge of the capabilities and characteristics of air, naval, and ground artillery ordinance. They are jump qualified, and trained to the nth degree. As far as I am concerned, they are an unknown special forces group.

    The guys in 2nd Force I knew had the utmost respect for ANGLICO..................
    I.A.C.O.J. Charter Member
    "Chet, get an inch and a half on that!"

    "Not for fame or reward,Not for place or rank. Not lured by ambition or goaded by necessity. But in simple obedience to duty as they understood it. These men suffered,sacrificed,dared all, and died. Let us never forget our fallen friends."

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    Quote Originally Posted by gunnyv
    Where do these heros come from?
    They're all around us,Gunny.The media doesn't like to talk too much about people who go above and beyond to make things right or to physically stop a wrong from happening in the first place.It discredits all they ever try to teach the unknowing.
    I was Navy and the closest I came to being in the Marines was when I dated this Lance Corporal Pouge up in Norfolk.She got ****ed because I wouldn't let her wear her uniform when visiting my destroyer(USS Mahan DDG 42).That's all I needed:to be seen kissing a Marine on the pier.

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    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson
    She got ****ed because I wouldn't let her wear her uniform when visiting my destroyer(USS Mahan DDG 42).That's all I needed:to be seen kissing a Marine on the pier.
    You wuss!


    Me? My wife got ticked at me bacause I wouldn't kiss her when I could see Drill Instructors while I was a civilian (out for 7 years) when visited Parris Island. Women are touchy about that affection thing. At least we can laugh about it now.
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

    "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

    www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

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    Forum Member gunnyv's Avatar
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    Speaking of heroes, just saw in the MC Times today that First Sgt Brad Kasal is getting the Navy Cross. Basically, he took 7 bullets and and a whole bunch of grenade fragments trying to pull another wounded Marine out of a house in Fallujah. For his full story, you can find it here:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=4525928

    You may remember him from this photo:
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    Last edited by gunnyv; 04-26-2006 at 03:06 PM. Reason: add'l info/spelling

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    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    Top, I say that over at grunt.com. Last I heard was that he was up for the Medal of Honor.

    He is also picking up Sergeant Major and still recovering from his wounds.

    I will also add that I would follow that man into battle anywhere, anytime.

    Even with that Beretta in his right hand.
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

    The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

    "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

    "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

    www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

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