Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Flanders, NJ
    Posts
    13,537

    Default Home Barbecue Fires Down

    NFPA releases home grilling fire numbers
    Decrease seen in gas grill fires since code change

    April 12, 2006 – Touting the success of code changes that required propane gas cylinders to have overfilling prevention device (OPD), the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) today announced that the number of home structure fires involving gas grills has been cut in half since the new requirement took effect in 1998. According to NFPA, the number of gas grill home structure fires decreased from 1,200 in 1997 to 600 in 2002. By contrast, the number of home structure fires involving charcoal grills remained steady during that same period.

    As part of NFPA 58, Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code, OPDs were required for new cylinders beginning in September of 1998 and all old cylinders had to be retrofitted with the devices beginning in April 2001. OPDs shut off the flow of propane before capacity is reached, limiting the potential for release of propane gas if the cylinder heats up. OPDs are easily identified by their triangular-shaped hand wheel.

    While the numbers of gas grill fires have gone down, NFPA still urged caution when grilling to ensure safe cookouts. Leaks and breaks in the gas cylinder or hose are the leading cause of gas grill fires, accounting for nearly half. Placing combustibles too close to heat, and leaving cooking unattended, are the two leading causes for charcoal grill home structure fires. Half of all gas grill and charcoal grill home structure fires begin on an exterior balcony or unenclosed porch, so it is important to grill not just outside your home but well away from your home.


  2. #2
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Bossier Parrish, Louisiana
    Posts
    10,382

    Default

    I was wondering if that trend was just my imagination, or if the number of fires were actyually decreasing. This is an example of fire reduction by regulation, which can be a very valuable tool. I have also noticed a decline in transpotation type incidents in private vehicles (relief valve activations due to overheating), and my assumption is that this regualtion has had an affect on that problem as well.

    We obviously still need to work on the education aspect, as the article points out the number of charcoal related fires have remained steady. We still have work too do .. and I hope the fire service does not rest on the good news contained in this article by not responding to the bad news.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. World Of Fire Report: 11-21-05
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-22-2005, 08:07 PM
  2. World Of Fire Report: 11-09-05
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-12-2005, 03:33 PM
  3. World Of Fire Report: 07-23-05
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-26-2005, 09:20 PM
  4. World Of Fire Report: 10-01-03
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-02-2003, 01:55 PM
  5. World Of Fire Report: 09-29-03
    By PaulBrown in forum World of Fire Daily Report
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-30-2003, 08:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts