1. #26
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    You know it, a transport is $275!!! Gotta give the medics something to do, might as well try and fund a raise. LMAO

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    This whole IDLH thing is funny. Hell, my local is an IDLH for most of you.
    ..............

    Brother I love this line!!!!!!!!!!!
    IACOJ Member

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    How do you explain to the brother or civilian hanging out of the window that you could'nt lower a rope to them from the roof because you had to climb back down to change your cylinder???????

    OH wait I have to stop cutting the roof! I'm out of air!

  4. #29
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    Chicago:

    We don't either.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    sure as hell wont wear a pac on the roof.
    Wondering what your reasoning is for this. Could you explain?

  6. #31
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    To each his own, but I like my lungs and would like to keep them healthy. I wear a pack on every car fire, and any smoke condition beyond food on the stove in a structure. I am usually the last one to remove his pack during overhaul. I don't find it that uncomfortable. I'd rather leave the mask on than cough, have my eyes tear up, and get dirt and insulation in my facepiece.

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    We dont wear pacs on the roof due to multiple reasons. Now im sure there are some of you who will say they can cut a hole just as well, just as fast, and stay just as steady with a pac. To that I will just say Im sure there are also some here that will say they have no problem leaning off the side of a dwelling popping windows with a hook with an extra 30 pounds on your back, again We also rarely wear pacs while venting from ladders. Only time im on a ladder with a pac is when im entering a heavily charged room. If im just popping the window, the pac isnt needed.

    This really is a rehashed topic. Some will wear pacs to a rubbish fire, some wont wear pacs no matter how charged the dwelling is. Fact is, when I am wearing a pac, that still doesnt mean im on air. I tend to practice air management. I will push as far as I can (remember that whole stay low thing) and when I cant make it any futher, I go on air. 20 mins later when some guys are "taking it outside " im still working.

    You do what you do, I do what I do. Im comming to get you if need be, and I will trust that the feeling is mutual.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  8. #33
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    for us it is:
    car fires-Yes
    AFA-yes -not on air unless conditions are reported
    Dumpster-officer discretion
    Structures-yes ..........
    Overhaul-depends on the CO, but usually no
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
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    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  9. #34
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    I wear mine when I'm running hose on calls we have,when it comes to structure fires I'll mask up at the door.I use to only wear it on structure fires not dumpster,cars etc.until one day a few years ago we were washing the truck from a call and the truck was just covered with soot and it took forever to scrub it off and I sat there and thought I've been breathing this sh@# in my lungs for all these years and that's not very cool so I wear it alot more than I use to.BE SAFE!!

  10. #35
    firefighter7160
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    Talking Smoke Smoke Smoke

    -------------
    Last edited by firefighter7160; 11-16-2007 at 12:10 AM.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    That is correct. I wont pac up for a car fire, dumpster fire and sure as hell wont wear a pac on the roof. Get over it. It was a question, I answered it. This whole IDLH thing is funny. Hell, my local is an IDLH for most of you.
    Thats all well and good, but here SCBA is not optional equipment. You dont have to be "on air" but the SBCA will be on your back for ALL fires. I dont agree with it per say (ie brush fires), but I dont make the rules.

    And its not just fires that it is required. Pretty much any fire-type cal (alarms, CO, gas leaks, odor checks), with the exception of wires down, is an SCBA call.
    Fire Marshal/Safety Officer

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    Failure is when fantasy meets reality

  12. #37
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    100 feet from the smoke. Ok then so what do you do when your face piece fogs up enroute? I mask up at the door this way I can talk to crew before entering. if you pull a line to the rear with a mask on for residental fire how much air could you possibly have duirng your fire fight or primary when it is needed most. Now I dont agree with not having a pack on while on the roof but I can also see y you wouldnt want one on. Your taught to cut on the upside of the wind on a pitched roof so smoke is going away from you. Your also taught to vent then get the hell off the roof. I vent windows with the ladder that way its ready for a VEST or bail.I always wear a pack but not on air until I need it. Brush fires no I dont wear em.
    Agian Im sure that all you career and volunteer who arrive on trucks you dont leave the jump seat wihtout your SCBA thats if one is in your seat.On air or not its probally on your back so y on earth wouldnt u use it when the air is no good? Car fires have been know to kill firefighters dead on the spot from the biproducts.
    Last edited by JAFA62; 05-04-2006 at 07:17 PM.

  13. #38
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    Default Scba or no Scba

    Everyone is responsible for their health, if you are too concerned over the weight and how cumbersome the pack is, maybe you should rethink your position on the fire dept. With todays fires and the amount of chemicals in them it is a good idea to wear you pack on every fire, regardless of how small it is. Yes it is user discretion and according to the sog's in place. I wear mine on every fire call, except for brush fires. My lungs are too important to me to not have my pack on or to be able to go on air. As for the mask, we mask up in the front yard or on the way to the call. Even if we are in rescue mode we pack up period. No discussion.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkoc1
    Everyone is responsible for their health, if you are too concerned over the weight and how cumbersome the pack is, maybe you should rethink your position on the fire dept.
    If you are that scared of smoke, maybe you should rethink your position on the fire dept.

  15. #40
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    Oh for the love of God! Could this topic get more silly...

    I have seen in this topic:

    Masking up before you get off the rig
    Breathing off the tank 100 feet from the smoke
    Mask on breathing air before you even get off the truck

    How far will this silliness escalate? Perhaps you should have scba on and breathing air as the rig is backed into the station before the Plymovent is hooked up. Perhaps the firehouse cook should be on air when using the station grill, whether it is gas or charcoal. Oh my GOD!!! We should be masked up when we do station duties because of the toilet bowl cleaner and disinfectants...they are after all chemicals that may be hazardous to our health.

    Look wear you mask when you feel it is appropriate but don't try to push your silly rules on me.

    You will never convince me to put my face piece on before I leave the rig...I can see better and operate faster outside the hot zone without the mask on and mask up in seconds before I enter.

    You will never convince me that maskin up and going on air 100 feet away from the fire is necessasry. Give me that air for use inside the structure. Not outside where it is still clear.

    AS for getting off the rig breathing air...I can't help but just shake my head at this one. WHY? Why waste air outside the danger area stretching lines or retrieving ladders or whatever? Unless you have one hour bottles (another foolishness in my humble opinion) how much time can you realistically have for interior work? I would hazard a guess of 10 minutes or less.

    All I can say is wow...safety of course....silliness in the name of safety...never.

    FyredUp

  16. #41
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    Fryed Up I agree 100% I realise these guys must be following SOGs but come on guys Use that air when its needed. I agree about being safe but when does being 2 safe become a unsafe act.
    Jafa62

  17. #42
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    I'm sitting here wondering how Phoenix, who took their SCBA's out of the crew compartments, can ever get to fire if they needed to be on air 100' from smoke....
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  18. #43
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    Guessin' they would ned some mighty long pre-connects.

  19. #44
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    I would guess you would need an hour bottle if your on air on the truck.

    How about some of you stay in east bumblejaw fighting grass fires with the occasional (5 tops) dwelling fires a year packed up on everything. I will stay here fighting dwelling fires with the occasional (3 tops) grass fires a year wearing my pac when I wanna.

    We will call it even
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    I would guess you would need an hour bottle if your on air on the truck.

    How about some of you stay in east bumblejaw fighting grass fires with the occasional (5 tops) dwelling fires a year packed up on everything. I will stay here fighting dwelling fires with the occasional (3 tops) grass fires a year wearing my pac when I wanna.

    We will call it even
    What he said!
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by RFDACM
    No joke: the dept. up the street from us wears their masks (not on air) while enroute! You can hear the officer talking through his mask calling for assignments. It usually causes a complete work stoppage in our station as everyone rolls around on the floor wishing they had a diaper on! The sad part is, they just don't know any better. They really think they're doing something good to speed their time into the building. Of course they can't be sure if they're in the right building or not through the fogged up mask!
    I've seen a couple of others knock this notion. Before I made apparatus operator, I always had my mask on in the rig so that I'd be ready to go once we arrived on scene (for car fires and structure fires only). The one time I wasn't ready, was the time I didn't get the nozzle (and the line was pulled from my rig). I've never had a problem with not being able to see or tripping over things. So, if it's not a problem for those that do it, don't knock 'em. If you don't want to mask up in the rig, then don't.

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    AS for getting off the rig breathing air...

    how much time can you realistically have for interior work? I would hazard a guess of 10 minutes or less.

    If their "trained" to be on air stretching lines, raising ladders, etc, FyredUp...

    Is it a bad thing they've self-limited the amount of time they can be inside?


  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalmatian190
    [i]

    Is it a bad thing they've self-limited the amount of time they can be inside?

    Only if your the victim, homeowner or trapped firefighter.

    Quote Originally Posted by Turdfergeson
    I've seen a couple of others knock this notion. Before I made apparatus operator, I always had my mask on in the rig so that I'd be ready to go once we arrived on scene (for car fires and structure fires only). The one time I wasn't ready, was the time I didn't get the nozzle (and the line was pulled from my rig). I've never had a problem with not being able to see or tripping over things. So, if it's not a problem for those that do it, don't knock 'em. If you don't want to mask up in the rig, then don't.
    Yeah, more of the: everyone's right, no ones wrong, touchy feely crowd. I guarantee that you cannot get as accurate a read on the fire building with a mask on. Period. You have restricted visibilty and peripheral vision, even before you fog up. And to not fog up? Must be the weather, cause I've yet to see a perfect mask that prevents fogging when it less than 98.6 F. Sometimes it doesn't happen, great. But firefighters need to reAd the building and performa personal size-up of the conditions and wearing a mask and running to grab the knob ignoring everything else like some insane whacker will not serve you well in a career of firefighting.

  24. #49
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    RFDACM...

    Could not possibly agree more with everything you said in your post.

    There is absolutley no way that you can be as efficient in those first few moments of size-up, laying lines or setting ladders or anything for that matter with a mask on. YES, have the scba on your back, YES have the mask in the ready state, either around your neck or hooked to the regulator and ready to go. But not on your face until you are ready to enter.

    For the getting off the rig with the mask on or breathing air crowd...is your hydrant man getting off the rig with his mask on? Or breathing air? Does scba get worn at brush fires? I haven't been to one yet that doesn't produce smoke. If not, so much for strict adherence to your rules and further proof of the silliness of those rules.

    I am going to tell you frankly I would laugh my butt off if I saw guys roll up to a fire call and jump off the rig...whoops, slowly climb down using every step with 3 point contact at all times with the rig...breathing air as they approached the scene. Talk about safety going well beyond the extreme...what a dramatic waste of air and a way to guarantee an incredibly short interior work time. Sorry, I just absolutely cannot even come close to getting on board with this one.

    Be safe, but be smart and safe, for those of you using air outside the hot zone of the fire...ever consider that those precious minutes of air you waste ouside may be the difference between you making a rescue or putting out the fire, or even more importantly, saving your own butt? Come on...there is no one here supporting that tactic. at least not that I have seen. I would love to hear the justification for that SOG.

    Run amok safety rules appear to me to be every bit as hazardous to firefighters and the civilians we protect.

    FyredUp

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    I have worn a pack at both a brush fire and car fire. and a truck fire. been on air too. do you need one? no, you don't. you can stay back and lob water on it from a safe distance, and then there is no need for an air pack.

    engine compartment fire? probably handle it with a booster line, no pack need.
    fully involved car fire? yeah, i'll have a pack on, and if it's really going, on air too.

    truck fire? hell yeah, if it's going, I'm putting a pack on, and going on air.

    small brush fire, no pack. but i can recall one fire in particular where it wasn't that big of an area, but it was starting to climb up some of the trees and expand into the woods. did I need a pack, no, it would have been handled without one. did the pack allow me to go right through the front of the fire and prevent it from extending into the rest of the woods, instead of having to push the fire back into the woods. so again, needed, no, useful, yes in this instance.

    btw, for structural alarms (fires, AFAs, smoke in the area, etc. ), I always have a pack. If I go on a roof, I have a pack on, and usually am on air. we primarily have SFD, so that is where my limited experience lies. I've been on calls that we initially thought were BS AFAs and they turned out to be fires, as well as smoke in the areas that ended up being fires. it's easier to drop a pack if it's not needed than to run back to the truck and grab one.

    they are my lungs, and my health, and I plan on having a long, healthy career. You don't have to if you don't want to, but when you have cancer and burns to your lungs from all your years of not putting a pack on and breathing smoke, I'll be standing proud watching my grandkids gets firefighter I certifications, as well as knowing that I'm still healthy enough to go inside with them.

    But that's just me
    If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

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