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  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber Salman1's Avatar
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    Question How do YOU describe a frame dwelling?

    I had this conversation a few times with Tom Brennan (r.i.p. brother!). We often went back and forth (in a good way ) regarding a first due officer's description of a dwelling with regard's to floors, attic space, dormer's, flat roof/peak roof etc. What do you call a dwelling that is gabled/not gabled etc.? Does a 2 1/2 story frame dwelling denote 2 stories with a 1/2 story (attic space etc) or is a 2 1/2 story essentially a 2 story frame? Basically, you don't use the 1/2 story description if it does not include living space (ah, you wouldn't know that would you if you weren't in it)...Just getting some opinion's from the field.

    The included photo's are some example's. Also, how would you describe a Cape Cod style dwelling? A 1 1/2 story or 1 story frame?...have fun!
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  2. #2
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    I'd say the first is a Three story frame-multiple dwelling with gasoline siding.
    The second is a 2 1/2 story frame dwelling (1 or 2 family in all likelyhood)

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    The first would be a 3 story multi family. The second would be a 2 story single family. I would worry about roof style with initial size up. Of course things could change once the walk around was done

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    I guess we consider the presence of double hung windows and shades in said windows to constitute a living space and therefore call the attic a floor. We call this the 1/2 story as its basically just that, half the space. If this had a gambrel roof with these windows, I'd call it 3 story.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber Halligan84's Avatar
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    3 story multi and a 2 1/2 story multi (note the 2 doors side by side on the front porch). The second is more likely to be a 2 family, the top could be 3 to 6 units.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber CFD Hazards's Avatar
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    Two of the most common types of construction here in New England. The first is a 3-decker. Access to the first floor from the front or back, access to the upper floors is usually from the rear but this may have a stairwell in the front also. This doesn't appear to, but the porches sometimes have stairs that run up to the top also. The second is a 2-1/2 wood frame with access to the first floor from the door on the left and upper floor from the right door and usually a door down the side or rear. The second picture could have either 2 or 3 families living there. We have numerous types of these buildings with that top attic area converted to apartments.
    Last edited by cfdeng3; 05-09-2006 at 08:19 AM.

  7. #7
    Forum Member MemphisE34a's Avatar
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    I didn't even look at the pictures. My question is who cares? Like originally stated you don't know for sure unless you have previously been in the occupancy. If you haven't, you report basically, your best guess. Its not the ACT or rocket science. If you report 2 1/2 story and it turns out to only be 2 story because the dormers are in unfinished attic space, does it really matter.

    Stretch the hose, do the search, throw the ladders, cut the utilities, set up the fan, etc. all the same.
    Last edited by MemphisE34a; 05-10-2006 at 08:04 PM.
    Robert Kramer
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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