1. #1
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    Default Interesting Stats And Other Safety Things

    LANDSCAPING SAFETY

    How to Cut Hazards Down to Size. By Lyonel Doherty

    If you’re into landscaping — whether professionally or at home — this is a busy time of year. Just be careful out there. Landscaping and gardening can be dangerous. In 2002, there were 70 fatalities in America’s ornamental shrub and tree services industry and 637 fatalities in the industry from 1992-2002. That’s an average of 58 deaths a year. Here’s how to nip those hazards in the bud.

    Landscaping Hazards
    Cuts, falls, back injuries and chemical exposures are just a few of the hazards landscapers face. Four types of accidents accounted for the most fatalities:

    • Struck by an object (a tree)
    • Fall to a lower level (from a tree)
    • Contact with electricity (when a limb hits a power line)
    • Struck by a vehicle or collision between two vehicles.

    3 Sets of Precautions
    Here are precautions to take when engaging in three kinds of dangerous landscaping work:

    1. Tree Trimming
    • Comply with power line clearance regulations (in general, 10 feet plus four inches for every 10kV over 50kV)
    • Assume all nearby power lines are energized. Avoid contact until the utility company has verified that the line has been de-energized
    • Inspect trees for possible hazards, such as broken or cracked limbs
    • Get chainsaw safety training and wear chaps
    • Always wear appropriate fall protection when working above ground
    • Wear PPE, including hardhats, safety goggles and ear protection.
    • Do not carry tools while climbing
    • Do not climb trees during wet or icy weather.

    2. Riding Lawn Mowers
    • Wear eye, hearing and foot protection
    • Clear the work area of any debris (sticks, stones etc.) that might be thrown by the blades
    • Mow straight up and down slopes rather than sideways
    • Keep safety devices and guards in place
    • Do not remove grass catcher or unclog the chute while the motor is running.

    3. Handling Pesticides
    • Don’t use pesticides unless you are trained
    • Follow all instructions on labels
    • Recognize signs of poisoning and correct first aid procedures
    • Wash hands before eating and drinking
    • Don’t work alone when handling these chemicals
    • Don’t use your mouth to blow out clogged spray nozzles
    • Don’t spray pesticides in windy conditions.

    Conclusion

    In addition to these precautions, make sure you and your workers have appropriate training that addresses the other potential hazards associated with outdoor work, such as heat stress and traffic control. Happy and safe landscaping, everyone.
    ------------

    5 Ways Kids Can Play Safe. by Catherine Jones

    May 6 to 13 is National Safe Kids Week. Here are five things parents can do to help keep their kids injury-free while playing outdoors:

    1. Playground Slides: Teach your child to go down the slide sitting down and facing forward, not headfirst.

    2. Electrical Hazards: Warn your kids to keep clear of overhead power lines when they fly kites or model airplanes, or when climbing trees.

    3. Mowing Lawns: Don’t let children under 12 operate walk-behind or ride-on lawnmowers. Let them help with yard work by raking the grass or removing rocks and other objects before you mow.

    4. Biking: Your child will be less resistant to wearing a bicycle helmet if:

    a. He sees that you always wear a helmet when riding; and
    b. She gets to help select the helmet.

    5. Trampolines: If you have a trampoline in your yard, enforce these three rules:

    a. No one on the trampoline without adult supervision;
    b. One person at a time on the trampoline; and
    c. No flips or somersaults.
    -------------

    Mountain Climbing Camming Anchor Recalled

    As if mountain climbing wasn’t dangerous enough, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has announced a voluntary recall of the Camming Anchor manufactured by Colorado Custom Hardware, due to a fall hazard.

    Camming anchors, also known as “Alien Cams” are used to stop climbers in the event of a fall. The anchor is inserted into a rock crevice and it grips the side of the crack. The manufacturer has received one report of an anchor cable failing to support a climber.

    The recalled product, which was sold nationwide and through web retainers from November 2004 to December 2005, has production dates (1104 to 1205) found on the bottom of the handle puller. Consumers are advised to stop using the devices and to contact the manufacturer for further instructions at 1.800.776.9185.

    View this recall online at www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml06/06141.html
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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    In 2002, there were 70 fatalities in America’s ornamental shrub and tree services industry
    When I read this, I thought it was going to be a joke. They are serious
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Post Yeah, Well..............

    Nobody has cared enough to make a study (as far as I know) but Our LODD rate in the Fire/Rescue/EMS Service is definately lower than some other occupations. I still think more Store Clerks die in the line of duty than Firefighters. (Any LEO types want to comment??) Not that I think we should take LODDs lightly, we MUST continue to try to minimize the number each year.
    Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
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    Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

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    I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

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  4. #4
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    I think you have a point there Harve. I dont recall any hard numbers, but a general comment is that those who work the graveyard shift at 7-11 and other type vendors are at a higher risk than most of us. What always makes me wonder, is that we always seem to put our young people to work on those shifts.

    Sure they are generally the quiet times, and between school and other activities those are the hours most available to them. But ya gotta wonder about their safety. Not that it really matters how old the person is when someone else decides to rob the store, or ventilate the clerk "just because".
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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