1. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAFA62
    Why wear bunker pants to a medical call? Good question its not in our SOP its just my preference I guess. Body fluids and other human junk is better off on my bunker gear then station wear. And a lot of times the call is not inside on that clean carpet if yah know what I mean.. Hell if I wreck my bunker pants then they replace it.. THEY HAVE TO ITS THE LAW. They cant allow u to wear FUBAR gear HEALTH AND SAFETY SAYS SO.
    Not a bad idea. Our department allows us to wear shorts, so I try to remember to put on my bunker pants for all of our medical calls when I have shorts on (I should anyway sinsce it is department policy).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave1983
    Just curious as to why you need bunker pants on medicals? Is this an SOP for some reason?
    I do the same...it's just easier. Plus my shears, penlight and chocks are in those.
    Last edited by pfd4life; 05-30-2006 at 08:55 PM.
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    *Cough* 99% of the time en-route *cough*

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    Directives say not to get dressed while vehicle is moving. Vehicle is moving when the driver is ready. He doesnt wear bunker gear. We are fully dressed upon arrival. You figure out how we do it.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

  5. #30
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    For the posters that wear thier turnouts to Medicals:

    Do you wash the bottom of your boots and bunker pants after every fire run? If not, and you wear them inside the patient's homes on medicals, aren't you bringing in an awful lot of dirt that will be left behind? Also, do you see any health risks to the residents from bringing in all that crap you just picked up on your last fire?

    I know that to some, the phrase "customer service" is a dirty word used only by departments that face to the southwest and bow three times a day following mindlessly the words of the Big Crazy Chief in the Desert, but the idea of tracking all that crap into the home certainly has to cause a mess (not to mention a potential health hazard) that I am sure the homeowners don't appreciatte. In fact we are forbidden from wearing bunkers inside the home on an EMS run for just that reason. To me I guess it's just basic courtesy.

  6. #31
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    I always tried to get dressed before jumping on.That wasn't always an option so putting on a bunker coat while strapped in a rig that goes airborne every quarter mile or so is a fun experience.Try it coming off a strained shoulder while the Captain that takes turns on 3 wheels is behind the wheel for extra points.
    It was preferred that everyone but the driver be fully turned out by the time we got on scene to allow us to hit the ground running.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaFireEducator
    For the posters that wear thier turnouts to Medicals:

    Do you wash the bottom of your boots and bunker pants after every fire run? If not, and you wear them inside the patient's homes on medicals, aren't you bringing in an awful lot of dirt that will be left behind? Also, do you see any health risks to the residents from bringing in all that crap you just picked up on your last fire?

    I know that to some, the phrase "customer service" is a dirty word used only by departments that face to the southwest and bow three times a day following mindlessly the words of the Big Crazy Chief in the Desert, but the idea of tracking all that crap into the home certainly has to cause a mess (not to mention a potential health hazard) that I am sure the homeowners don't appreciatte. In fact we are forbidden from wearing bunkers inside the home on an EMS run for just that reason. To me I guess it's just basic courtesy.
    First...I've never tracked anything into a persons apartment or house...its called wiping your feet. Try it out it works out great. Also I don't ever recall hearing any protests as the people are usually more worried about their loved ones health than my footwear or pants. If they have time to concern themselves with my pants or boots...odds are it isn't an emergency and they should have not wasted our time and just hailed a taxi to take them to the hospital.

    Second...my personal and my family's health come first. I don't want to be kneeling or stepping in any sh*t, blood, vomit, urine, semen, spinal fluid...etc in regular work duty pants and shoes.(many times thats even before we get to the patient ) Don't like my bunker pants?...then call your councilman and tell them to stop sending firemen on EMS runs.

    To me it is basic common sense that the members should be able to protect themselves to the highest degree they feel comfortable with...but as with many things nowdays common sense is a vanishing commodity; Furthermore some insist we should have to listen to some idiot desk jockey who spent most of his career avoiding fire duty and real world issues while he traversed the seminar circut with his circus act and his own dept was left like a rudderless ship without it's Captain.

    FTM-PTB

  8. #33
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    Um pretty sure you should wash your turnout gear after every working call. Thats if you got it dirty. And yes I wash my boots after every dirty job Why wouldnt I? Why wouldnt you? And if the VSA pt is upset that i got their carpet dirty well maybe the clean EMTs should just go and Fire just sit in the house and wait for other calls.
    Even they get dirty, more so with human junk then us. And I bet they wash up after a call. And if you dont clean up GOOD FOR YOU.. Im 100% sure the VSA pt not going to care to much.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAFA62
    Um pretty sure you should wash your turnout gear after every working call. Thats if you got it dirty.
    You're right. In a perfect world that would happen. But I'm only issued one set of bunker gear, and if I get dirty at a fire...guess what. I'm dirty for the rest of the shift.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurdFergeson
    You're right. In a perfect world that would happen. But I'm only issued one set of bunker gear, and if I get dirty at a fire...guess what. I'm dirty for the rest of the shift.
    Right on! I can agree with that.
    On a side note if we get an alarm while in service we'll probably gear up
    en-route

  11. #36
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    The policy, to my understanding, has always been to don your bunkers before getting on the rig. However, I personally have done a fair share of "engine surfing" while on the job. Engine surfing, of course, is trying to stand up, put on your bunkers and shift your weight in the opposite direction the driver is driving. Tricky... Exciting... But probably not safe.

    We received a new pumper last month and we have no choice but to bunk up before getting in. There are flashing lights and loud whistles that all go off if we have members not buckled up with the parking break off.

    As far as bunkers on medical calls, I only wear mine when I already have them on or when I'm wearing shorts (night runs, during PT, and -- coming this summer -- when we are allowed uniforms shorts). As clean as I try to keep my bunkers, I only have one pair and they aren't always spotless. I know one address where I've personally dirtied a woman's nice white carpet twice while running on her husband. Like one poster said, the emergencies were legitimate and she didn't really mind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PFDTruck18
    Directives say not to get dressed while vehicle is moving. Vehicle is moving when the driver is ready. He doesnt wear bunker gear. We are fully dressed upon arrival. You figure out how we do it.
    Scary. This is how jakes get run over on the apron. It's not like that is unprecedented.

    May I recommend what we do in our house: Vehicle is moving when driver has confirmed all passengers are ready.

    Maybe you didn't mean it that way.....
    Last edited by RLFD14; 06-08-2006 at 10:01 AM.
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    Right on FFred! I always wear my bunker pants on ems runs, they protect me from everything you listed. Especially since I never wear anything but shorts at work. And half the time some of the apts. I go into are so discusting I would'nt kneel in them to begin with!

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    EDIT< EDIT EDIT
    Last edited by wag11c; 06-08-2006 at 08:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by doughesson
    I always tried to get dressed before jumping on.That wasn't always an option so putting on a bunker coat while strapped in a rig that goes airborne every quarter mile or so is a fun experience.Try it coming off a strained shoulder while the Captain that takes turns on 3 wheels is behind the wheel for extra points.
    It was preferred that everyone but the driver be fully turned out by the time we got on scene to allow us to hit the ground running.
    The Captain shouldn't be driving.
    RK
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    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAFA62
    Um pretty sure you should wash your turnout gear after every working call. Thats if you got it dirty.
    If you go to a "working" incident and don't get dirty, your not doing your job!!
    RK
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    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  17. #42
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    PFDTruck 18

    I know what you meant, you don't get on around here, you might get left. It normally only happens once every long while. Leave somebody one time, then tear their *** up for not being on the equipment.....word gets around. People come here and get on.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a
    If you go to a "working" incident and don't get dirty, your not doing your job!!
    MemphisE34a?????
    An engineer wont always get dirty.Im pretty sure not everyone that shows up at a working call will get in the building for the attack or even overhaul.
    Unless you have a small crew for every working call. If after a fire and your gear is dirty then yes you should wear just your uniform or put the gear back on (Career). If your a vollie and have no duty uniform your showing up in your civies and getting body junk on them. Then what you get back in your POV and bring it home?

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    Default Be prepared...

    I agree with LaFireEducator...My dept. responds to a majority of medical emergencies (ALS) and I'm on an ALS Quint apparatus. Most of the time, our gear is in the apparatus cab with us enroute to most emergencies. Most of the time, our staffing is 3 firefighters. If a fire run comes in, especially a report of a building fire etc. We usually stop immediately and don our protective gear.
    First, it ensure's we're all getting off the apparatus at the scene of the emergency prepared. I don't think it looks to0 professional arriving at a working fire and the resident's/public see the firefighter's getting out of the truck unprepared and putting on their gear. They will assume we did not choose to get ready while we were responding from our quarters (Most assume we're in quarters alot).
    Secondly, donning your gear prior to the apparatus moving, ensures the firefighter's are belted and prepared to respond in the safest manner. I know, we can't always have it like that in the real world and I often get dressed enroute when we're just around the corner of an emergency because we're returning from a run. I try to always at least have my bunker pants on so if a medical comes in, I can remove them vs. the harder task of putting them on and stressing myself out trying to contort to the rear cab area getting the rest of my gear on. We've all been there.

    As far as the rest of the ensemble ie. SCBA etc....I prefer getting out of the rig and grabbing the scba straps etc. and donning it outside the rig, on the ground. Please, those of you who do this...try not to have your mask on and helmet without regulator hooked up before you exit the vehicle. This is a major tripping hazard and you usually fog up before you even get off the rig. Go on air when you're about to do battle. ie. at the threshold or the floor of attack (this one is often a subject of controversy, for another time). Getting out of the rig, looking around while your getting your scba on and assembling tools/tic etc. gives you the opportunity to "slow it down" a bit and observe your surrounding and the crew will mesh quicker doing so...

    Just some personal experience/advice. I haven't done it all nor will I have ever done it all...

    I'll save that for the bigger city folks etc.

    Christian Frezza
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  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a
    PFDTruck 18

    I know what you meant, you don't get on around here, you might get left. It normally only happens once every long while. Leave somebody one time, then tear their *** up for not being on the equipment.....word gets around. People come here and get on.

    That's how it is with my old volunteer department.The only time I ever actually threatened an officer was to say I was going to take all his Korn,Nirvana and other CDs and replace them with Yanni,John Tesh and Celine Dion if he rolled the rig while I was high stepping into the station.If he thought I was coming,he'd hold the engine for me. ;D
    In regards to the original post,we are supposed to be geared up before rolling but on a few occasions,I had to get dressed for the occasion while in transit.Riding a school bus stood me in good stead on those times.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a
    The Captain shouldn't be driving.
    He likes to drive and volunteers don't always have designated people able to respond when the pager goes off.My old department's policy was that if you drive,you better be able to run the pumps when you get there,with variations for the air truck and rescue/utility truck.
    We do what we can with what we got at the time.

  22. #47
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    the Captain that takes turns on 3 wheels
    I think this statement is why Memphis said he should not be driving, not the fact that he is a Captain.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by MemphisE34a
    The Captain shouldn't be driving.

    This may not be the case 100% of the time....

    Our TL is a monster that only a select few can handle...those few being a majority of the officers and some senior ff's, while younger guys are learning its no walk in the park. So at fires, there are usually a bunch of officers so sometimes they will end up manning the TL or an engine or whatever is needed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42
    I think this statement is why Memphis said he should not be driving, not the fact that he is a Captain.
    Maybe so.I tended to trust the guy with my life,but not my money or my wife.I figured he knew where the rollover point was on that Pierce in the conditions he'd drive that way.If nothing else motivated him,he was riding that rig too and wouldn't want to get hurt anymore than he'd want to be the only survivor and getting asked"Why?".

  25. #50
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    in the volunteer co. its tough to get there and put on all the gear b4 gettin in the rig. i usually throw my pants on and put my coat on once i'm in, then buckle up.

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