1. #1
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    Default Heavy Iron Course.

    Just a little while back one of our local Depts offered a operators course for running cats and blades on fedral fires. Does anyone have any more information of these types of courses or was it just a once in a lifetime thing?

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    I've taken the dozer boss class, is thats what it was, or was it an actual operators class?
    "Hard work spotlights the character of people: some turn up their sleeves, some turn up their noses, and some don't turn up at all"

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    I am not entirely sure, what did the dozer boss inculded?

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    The dozer boss class is 8 hours and covers dozer safety/tactics/check in and paper work.
    I would think an operator class would be 40+ hours. Covering operations of the machines, maintenance, and more in depth stuff
    "Hard work spotlights the character of people: some turn up their sleeves, some turn up their noses, and some don't turn up at all"

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    I don't think you can teach that stuff in a class...what it takes to run a Cat is seat time and lots of it...and that is expensive...therefore you either learn it doing construction, or one of the specialized equipment operation schools. Also around here at least the Cat operators are also fully qualified as truck and equipment mechanics.

    Birken

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    I've been looking into the dozer operator world as another option, what our dozer operators told me is there isn't any specific training required, they basically take you out to the field and have you drive the equipment, if you are good enough then you can be an operator, if you show promise you might be able to get a job as a swamper until you do have enough skill.

    Like BV said the training is lots of time operating dozers.

    If someone was offering a dozer operators class, I'd guess it was a class to teach experienced operators about working fires. The paperwork, fire behavior, ICS etc, not a class to make firefighters into operators.

    Dozerboss is not an operator course it teaches the student how to manage and take care of dozers on a fire, capabilities / limitations of dozers, paperwork etc. The dozerboss does a lot of walking.
    Last edited by NonSurfinCaFF; 06-07-2006 at 12:48 AM.

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    I Guess i should have rewored my earlier posts, i have ran dozers, blades, cranes, belly dumps, and about any other type of equpiment that might be used to build drilling rig locations. My question was if there was a specific class that I would have to take to be able to work on a fire for the feds? Kind of like the red card heavy equpiment.

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    It varies from region to region, in this area they have 1-2 state dozers with code 3 equipment on their transport trucks ready to roll on an initial dispatch, they are operated by the mechanics who otherwise work at the shops all day and take their fire pagers home at night. There is also an emergency hire list of the construction/timber Cats with their own operators and transports who are required to respond within a certain time frame and generally are extremely fast and experienced. They do take a class but it is more about filling out paperwork and ICS than operating the machines. They like to pair the hired machine with an agency machine, because the agency operator will be able to "show by doing" what the hired operator should be doing and Cats work better in pairs anyway. Also there is the usual basic wildland, S-130, S-190, I-100, etc. that will keep you out of trouble and let you at least know how to behave in the fire organization.

    Birken

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