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  1. #1
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    Default Recommended Equipment

    Im joining a department pretty soon here and was wondering what they should be giving me I know it is different in every area I now they will give me a turnout and a helmet with a bag, and a pager, is there anything else I should get? also is there anything I should Get myself?


  2. #2
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
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    let me give you piece of advice ..............I doubt there is no one here on YOUR department ..........so check with YOUR Chief , and skip the 800000000 other speculative replies that will get posted here.
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  3. #3
    Forum Member THEFIRENUT's Avatar
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    All you can do is hope that you will be getting plenty of training to go along with all the "neat" stuff they will be giving you. Be patient; having knowledge is more important than anything else your department will give you.

    Welcome aboard, take care and stay safe!!
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

  4. #4
    Forum Member HFRH28's Avatar
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    Only thing i have to recommend for you is to get a pager case. This saves you from damaging the pager, and also helps show a sense of responsibility.
    Service is the rent you pay for having space on earth.

  5. #5
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    A map to your fire station....just say NO to POV response!

  6. #6
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    no worries I live like 2 min away from the station, and also i haven't gotten to talk to the chief a wholelot, I just shook his hand and that was it he was kind of nonresponsive to my questions.

  7. #7
    Forum Member ndvfdff33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefSquirrel
    A map to your fire station....just say NO to POV response!
    I'll drink to that
    If someone with multiple personalities threatens to kill himself, is it considered a hostage situation?

    Ryan

  8. #8
    Forum Member THEFIRENUT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefSquirrel
    A map to your fire station....just say NO to POV response!
    Responding to the scene or to the station???
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

  9. #9
    Forum Member Chauffeur6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VargaM1
    he was kind of nonresponsive to my questions.
    Well, that's certainly encouraging!

    Seriously though, strike up a casual conversation with some of the other members that've been there awhile and see what they say. Most vollie depts will issue you a pager fairly quickly, but you may have to wait a bit for turnout gear. They may give you a set of beat up hand me downs, or if the apparatus has gear on it (usually day boots, coats and helmets), you may have to suffer through that for a while. You won't be interior qualified for a while anyway, so they probably won't rush getting you fitted up for $1,500 worth of custom gear. They'll want to see that you stick around first. If they have the funds and are a progressive dept, you may even get your own SCBA mask at some point after you're interior qualified and they're convinced you're in it for the long haul. Anything they give you above and beyond this is a bonus in my opinion.

    Now, as far as anything you should get yourself, my advice is to take it slow. Plenty of new members want to go out and order half the Galls catalog, but there is no need to. Again, get to know how the dept operates, what types of calls they generally run, what equipment the senior guys carry, etc. before spending any money on personal toys. Also, if your area has blue lights, go easy, especially in the beginning. To be frank, some guys can be turned off or get the wrong first impression about a new member that shows up to his first calls with a car full of blue lights at Mach speed. Until you complete a few months of training, you're just really not a necessary enough part of the dept that you need to rush to the firehouse. Honestly, you're not going to be missed if you don't make a truck. I have respect for the low key new members that don't even use a blue light until they're at least interior certified. That little bit of restraint goes a long way in my book.

    Most of all, as TFN said, get as much training as you can. Without it, no matter how good your gear or equipment is, or how much of it you have, it will be useless if you don't know how to use it and operate safely and efficiently. Don't be afraid to ask questions if you're not 100% sure of something.

    Welcome to the service, and good luck.

  10. #10
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    I'm fairly new to the fire service so maybe I can offer some advice.

    First, very important, being a fire fighter is a very technical thing. While you will run into some guys that have been in it for many years and don't do anything or know much, many of them have years of experience and training and it is very important that you listen to them if they offer you some instruction. Even if you know the topic already, pay attention because the next sentence out of their mouth may be something you don't know.

    Get as much training in the basics as you can. If you are allowed to take training through the county or state try to take it, this in addition to regular drill.

    Be paitent about doing the glory jobs. First learn the basics. You will not be driving the trucks or running the pumps very soon so forget about it. Learn where everything is on the trucks and what they are used for.

    Some of the goodies that guys buy, I would wait. I really wanted a helmet light but once I got it I didn't like it. But other guys love them. The lighter you travel the better. When I took the state Fire Fighter 1 skills test I saw guys with ladder belts on. Hard to imagine why someone would walk around for 8 hours with a ladder belt when you can do a leg lock without any equipment, but hey, it's a free country. If your state offers essential of firefighting class, take it as soon as possible.

    I wish you the best of luck. I personally started this endever at age 46 and in the last year and a half
    have attended 248 hours of state fire school. Some of the guys are happy to have a newb who has some gumption but there are a few that are kind of weird about it. Most vollie companies need help but some guys don't want competition from the new guy. Oh well, being the best you can be is more important than who is the first to burst in through the front door. I try not to act like I'm some kind of expert, fire fighters remind me of artists, they can be emotional at times and can have fragile egos.

    Fighting fire is like riding a horse, just when you think you really know how it's done, that old nag bucks you right off his back. It is a very physical and dirty job. But it is also a heck of a lot of fun. I couldn't wait to pack up for the first time and enter a house that was on fire. I live in a rural area so we don't have many fires so it was about a year before I got to really rumble. The good thing for me was on that call I didn't have to ask if I could pack up, I had plenty of training at that point so I rode the first due and went right in.

    Just remember, someone has to roll up the hoses and clean up the gear as it will not do this on it's own. Get used to doing these kinds of things and as your skills increase you will do more stuff. It is a great feeling being a part of a team that rescues a person trapped in a wrecked car or stops a garage fire from destroying the house. Show up for every call that you can make, many are BS calls but show up anyway.

  11. #11
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    Yes this was what I was told by some guys about my first duty I guess, I would be able to respond and get turnouts but no running into burning buildings without FF1. I want to go into Law Enforcement and maybe this could be the way into it, how is a fire marshall, of course I will get into fire first and see if I like it and then maybe fire marshall/ investigator, but I like to plan ahead. Also I am looking for something to take FF1 in one shot are there any options in the state of VA? I don't like the idea of having to do it over several months as I have limited vacation right now, I am on summer vacation until college. Anothe Q I am hearing of the whole problem with manpower during the weekdays, I was thinking of doing Distance education this would give me lots of time to help out during the week how does this sound? And one more thing before I drag this on too long how would an associates in fire science help out?

  12. #12
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    My belief is you should get very little if anything on your own. The dept should provide everything you need with a few exceptions.

  13. #13
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    Well I don't know about FF1 in Virginia, but in PA the only way that I know of getting it (FF1) in one shot so to speak is to enroll in a fire service program at a college such as Bucks County Community College.

    Also in PA, the only way to get FF1 is to take the challange test which consists of 100 question written test and 12 skills stations. You have to know 26 skills stations but will only be required to do 12.

    The prerequisites for FF1 in PA are:
    Basic First Aid (4 hours)
    CPR/AED (4 hours)
    HazMat Awareness (4 hours)
    Structural Burn Session (16 hours)

    A prerequsite for structural burn session is Essentials which was 88 hours, now it is 160+ hours.

    Helpful but not necessary is FF1 review (32 hours)

    This is not to discourage you but as you can see, FF1 isn't an easy thing to get. It took me a year and a half to get FF1 and I was focused on it like a lazer. Had I not got messed up trying to schedule a structural burn class last fall, I could have taken the challange test last November but the extra time to prepare made passing the test the first time so much easier for me. I took the FF1 review class twice and it really helped me alot. My partner (whom i never met before the test) had 31 years in the fire service and I was better prepared for the test then he was. But as I always say, if I can make FF1, anyone can. VA may do things different than PA.

    Tom

  14. #14
    Forum Member MetalMedic's Avatar
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    I think VargaM1 is looking for a simple answer to a basic question. When I first joined the fire department back in 1980, the first piece of advise I was given by one of the "seasoned" firefighters was to buy myself a GOOD flashlight. Sure, the department may provide one and there is likely some available on the trucks, but from my experience over the years, they often leave a lot to be desired and/or they are not where you need them when you need them. IMHO, a good flashlight is a necessity in this business since it is needed so often and could save your life in many situations. For that reason, I have always sought out a sturdy, bright, water tight and reliable flashlight that fits well in a flashlight pocket on my turn out coat.

    You will likely develop a desire for other "gadgets" as you move forward in this business. I have taken to buying my own gloves over the years because the "low bid" gloves just didn't suit me very well. But, you won't identify these needs until you have spent some time on the department to find out what they provide you with and how well it performs.
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

  15. #15
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    I would say you should get a pair of eye protection if they haven't issued you a pair with your gear.

  16. #16
    MembersZone Subscriber npfd801's Avatar
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    As the gear geek/goon/quartermaster/@sshole for my department, I don't give the newbies anything they don't need until they need it. You come in for your first couple weeks of training, you get issued an Essentials manual and a bright yellow recruit t-shirt. You show to those classes, you get a yellow helmet, boots, coat and one pair of gloves. Not new, but cleaned and repaired to be safe, and I have enough usually to make sure you have something that fits pretty well. You show up for classes until you get to SCBA training, and then you get issued your own mask and bag.

    I have lots of stuff to give besides that, but I don't waste my time or budget giving it to folks as it always seems I'll hand it out and people quit. I give safety glasses, glove holders, pocket masks for CPR once you get that, on and on. We explain this to the newbies, but there are always a couple that go spend $100 bucks on junk like this at the local shop that sells the stuff. I was there once, and itched to have the stuff but save your money. We issue you everything here but a personal flashlight, which again - is a waste of money until you get through your class with us, because we won't let you use it anyway in our burn towers (no crutches, you learn to do it with zero vis), and you aren't allowed to run until the end of your initial training. Department t-shirts come after you get through the first round of training. I need to buy more of it, but we'll also issue a length of webbing which is useful for holding doors open on cut jobs, pulling out a downed FF, moving heavy hose, etc.

    I'll buy you a new black helmet, leather boots and custom fit top of the line gear if you make it to your year/probabation. That involves another round of classes to earn your FFII cert in Illinois. You'll also get a job-shirt pullover at your year as well, and a Gut Belt.

    If you know they won't buy it for you, the small stuff is nice. Honestly though, put some time in before you load up, and see what they'll give you. I always have to smirk at the new guys who have three pounds of stuff strapped to their helmet, which is guaranteed to get lost in the burn tower at some point.

    The best stuff you can buy now?

    Q-tips - so you can listen extra well, and soak in everything.
    Duct-tape - to keep your mouth shut (but never be afraid to ask questions, no matter how stupid you think they are.)
    Wheaties - to give 110% effort in training, and to help the guys with time on. You'll instantly earn their respect if you bust your tail, and when cleaning up, checking trucks, etc. We had a fire this morning where most of the clean-up was done by the guys with lots of time on. I'm not against doing it, but EVERYONE should be doing it.

    There's probably more of these to add...
    Last edited by npfd801; 07-01-2006 at 04:06 PM.

  17. #17
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    Best thing you can buy is good quality formal training (if the dept. doesn't send you on their dime).

    An escape rope, section of webbing, a few wedges, nails, wire cutters, and some chalk aren't bad ideas either (and are fairly cheap).

  18. #18
    MembersZone Subscriber ChiefReason's Avatar
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    Right now, you need:
    open eyes
    open mind
    closed mouth
    Forget about any of the fun stuff that you have heard about. That comes later.
    No truckman's belt, no multi tools or window punches. Forget about rescue ropes, rescue gloves or mini halligans.
    Get the gear that identifies you as "Your Newness" and study hard.
    Toys for the big boys also comes later.
    But in time.
    Good luck.
    CR
    Visit www.iacoj.com
    Remember Bradley Golden (9/25/01)
    RIP HOF Robert J. Compton(ENG6511)

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by THEFIRENUT
    Responding to the scene or to the station???
    Does it really matter? It's a liability nightmare. At most, only allow Chief/Asst. Chief to equip their POV's.

  20. #20
    Forum Member THEFIRENUT's Avatar
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    Default Clearing the air!!

    Quote Originally Posted by SgtScott31
    Does it really matter? It's a liability nightmare. At most, only allow Chief/Asst. Chief to equip their POV's.
    I was making the comment that we usually get to the station in our POVs. How else would you get there???? Is the "fire truck" going to come to your house and pick you up?? This was meant to be a joke and not an fight about POVs responding with "lights"!!!
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

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