1. #1
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    Default Navy Damage Controlman

    I am in the process of entering the Navy reserve and I'm looking at the Damage Controlman rate. From what I've read it seems to be a good stepping stone for a job in the local Fire Dept. This link is the job description and I look forward to hearing from anyone. Oh, I'm also 29 years old and looking to change careers if that matters.

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    I was in the Navy when they split the Damage Controlman back out of the Hull Technician Rating in the late 80's. I worked with those guys closely, but wasn't one myself. I spent 6 years on active duty and was exposed to a lot of fire fighting training while there.

    That said, shipboard firefighting is a different kind of animal from structural firefighting. It has similiarities, put the wet stuff on the red stuff, but the techniques and tactics are a little different.

    My training is over 15 years old, so some things might have changed. A defensive (surround and drown) tactic is not usually considered a successful shipboard response. Ventilation on fire attack is not common. Usually we took pains to try and contain the heat and smoke, as much as possible, to the compartment of origin. After the fire was out, smoke curtains and smoke ejectors were deployed to direct the smoke out of the ship following a planned route. We frequently worked with two hose teams. One team attacked the fire, the second team using fog patterns to protect both teams from the heat.

    The next most important point everyone on board the ship has firefighting duties. Everyone receives basic hose handling and fire suppression training in boot camp. Everyone is expected to participate in regular firefighting drills on board ship. There are several advanced shipboard firefighting courses available to anyone of any rate. A good percentage of people attend them.

    Everyone on the ship is responsible for maintaining the basic firefighting equipment in their work areas and berthing compartments. Each division will assign a sailor and a petty officer to be specifically in charge of their equipment.

    Depending on the area of the ship, people can become subject matter experts on fighting fires in their unique compartments. I was a Machinist Mate, I worked in the engine room of a steam powered ship. I wrote the Engineroom portion of the Main Space Fire Doctorine that was adopted across my class of ship.

    What do Damage Controlmen do then? They do the maintenance on shipboard systems and equipment not specifically assigned to one division. For example, they take care of all the equipment inside damage control lockers and the portable fire pumps placed strategically around the ship. They train and supervise the maintenance people assigned from other divisions. They become the leaders of the duty fire teams. At see they make up the bulk of the "flying squads" who are the immediate response to fires at sea.

    You will learn a lot about fire. You will become proficient at a lot of the daily prevenative maintenance tasks around a fire station. You will get good experiance with airpacks. You will learn how to apply temporary patches to leaking pipes and use materials to shore up damaged walls and bulkheads.

    My experiance was that my training made it easier for me to pick up things around the fireground. My leadership training and supervisory experiance gave me skills that still help today in managing an incident. I gained a better appreciation for pre-planning.

    I don't believe my training gave me any specific advantage in getting hired by a fire department, it just helped me advance faster once I was hired.

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    Excellent. That just about sums up my entire thought process. Thank you for your quick response.

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    Default

    I was under the impression that DC was an active duty only rate. Did your recruiter tell you otherwise?

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    It is listed under the Navy Reserve, as well. I'm bouncing between a couple different rates and I have not spoken to the recruiter about all of them.

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    Hmm, interesting. I've been in 12 years and I've never seen a reservist in that rate, but you're right--it's on the NR recruiting site.

    One piece of advice- ask to meet with members of some of the units you're looking to join. Don't just talk with recruiters. They won't have the "inside info" on any particular units, and, while they won't lie to you, they do have a vested interest in signing you up.

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    My best friend joined the Navy and picked that rating thinking it would help him get a fire job. It did him zero beyond the veterans points anyone in the service would get. A DC rarely gets any firefighting certifications (ie FF I and II) that would get him in the door. I imagine even less in the Reserve. The only sure way to get accredited firefighting training in the armed forces is to get an MOS as a firefighter, and the Navy doesn't have one. There is a lot of military FF info on the Military Forum here.

    http://forums.firehouse.com/forumdis...prune=20&f=300

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    Everyone here is correct. When I came off active duty in 1994 as a Damage Controlman and tried to go Reserves, I was told that there were no billets available for DCman in the Reserves. Most Reserve units around me are aviation units or shore based support. I have since joined the Army Guard as a firefighter (95-97) and then the Air Guard as a firefighter (97-current). Feel free to PM or email me for more information pertaining to this rate.

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    Well I can say the information provided hasn't been the most positive thing I have read. All I can do is finish up the paperwork, go down to MEPS and see what the job list is.

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    sorry the information you got wasn't the information you were hoping for. On the other hand, at least you won't get stuck in a career field that you will hate for your entire enlistment.

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    I'm not sure I would hate it, though. Seems like the DC is the person to go when problems come up. I like that thought, actually. I could always get FF I/ II on my own time courtesy of the US Gov't.

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    I was under the impression that DC was an active duty only rate. Did your recruiter tell you otherwise?

    I was wondering the same thing, I always thought reservists mainly were Seabee's
    NEVER FORGET!
    9/11/01

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    Seems like the DC is the person to go when problems come up

    On a sub...No...go talk to the MM's


    HOOYAH A-GANG
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    9/11/01

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    Actually, the Navy DOES have a firefighting rate. It is NEC 7012. It is the same fire academy all other DOD folks go to. Bad thing is that the Navy only sends folks who have been in for a while (E-4 and better), contrary to the other branches who send their folks right after basic training. Most of the Navy folks that get sent are ABH (Botswain Mate Handler) rated. Have you considered going AFR or ANG? Then you could go to the academy right after basic and then know for a fact you would be performing firefighting duties. The academy will get you FF I, II, Airport Firefighter, and HazMat Awareness/Ops (all IFSAC). If you are dead-set going Navy, have you thought about HM (Health Mate)? This would almost surely let you get your EMT (or higher), which is almost a "must have" for fire service these days. There's other options too, including using career development courses from DOD and finding a military fire department to proctor your written and practical testing. If you need help or more info, I'd be glad to assist.

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    Default Navy DC Man

    Hey man I was a DC for 5 years. Just got on a dept out herein VA. The DC Rate helped me zero. I couldnt carry over any certs. All we did was chase DCTT flags around and never got any actual fires, except the little baby propane fires at the trainer. If I had to do it all over I would have been a corpsman. At least then you can get EMS certs that would carry over. Miliraty either way I think can help.

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    If you are dead-set going Navy, have you thought about HM (Health Mate)? This would almost surely let you get your EMT (or higher), which is almost a "must have" for fire service these days.
    HM = Hospital Corpsman, not "health mate"... also, to my understanding, HM "A" School no longer teaches nor certifies EMT skills for its students. The Army and Air Force both provide training and certification as an NREMT-B to new members enlisting as Army Healthcare Specialists (MOS 91W soon to change to 68W) or Air Force Aeromedical or Medical Service members (AFSC 4N0X1, IIRC).

    Also, the Air Force and Army both have specific Firefighter job classifications (Army MOS 21M, I don't recall the AFSC--ANGFireman can advise), recruits for both services attend the DOD Fire Academy at Goodfellow AFB. I did meet a couple of 21Ms during my time @ military.com, they advised that finding an open 21M slot is a very rare occurrence, as there are only a few hundred 21Ms Army-wide...every other day we'd get recruits on the Joining the Military or Army discussion boards asking about goin 21M, and their response was always the same: good luck!

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    I stand corrected 1141. Silly me to think the HM would stand for actual initials. However, when I was recently stationed at a Navy base across the pond, all of the HM's were required to be EMT. Also pretty much true when I worked for NRSW Fallon, where they rode along-side FES manning the ambulance with us (but that was a long time ago and it might have changed since then). But maybe these are base specific requirements. Still, options abound no matter what. If it was me, I would look at ANG or AFR-but then I am biased due to being prior AF way back when. I just think the AF system is head and shoulders above every other branch when it comes to fire related stuff.

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    FED--My experience is from NAS Lemoore...we may very well know some of the same people. *LOL*

    Now as for those working ambulance, yes, they do have to be EMT-Bs at least...but the other HMs, no. As I understand it, there used to be a Reserve-specific NEC for HM with EMT cert, but that no longer exists. I also understand that HM "A" School is no longer teaching nor certifying NREMT courses... that info is less than a year old and on good authority from several BTDTs at military.com.

    For medicine, you're probably right--go AF/AFR/ANG. Air Force medical facilities are more like chest and waist above Army and Navy med centers...*LOL* I really didn't like going to the hospital at NASL as a kid, would've rather suffered 9 times outta 10.

    Anyways, if you're going to enlist in the Army for medicine, go 91WM6 (that's the LVN Additional Skill Identifier) if at all possible.

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    1141,
    I am quite certain we know some of the same folks as I know a few guys who work at Lemoore, and many more in NRSW. If anyone goes Army, 91W career field, then they get to come to my base! Lucky them indeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FEDVVFAC
    1141,
    I am quite certain we know some of the same folks as I know a few guys who work at Lemoore, and many more in NRSW. If anyone goes Army, 91W career field, then they get to come to my base! Lucky them indeed.
    FED: You know Karl K or Jerry M with NASL EMS? Both of them have been there some years...don't know how long ago you were involved with NRSW, though.

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    The main person I know at NASL is Ray C., the training officer. I know most of the folks at Fallon, and a few in El Centro, San Diego, and the Ventura complex. So are we hijacking this thread or just passing time until wolf comes back and tells us what he decided to do?

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    Quote Originally Posted by FEDVVFAC
    So are we hijacking this thread or just passing time until wolf comes back and tells us what he decided to do?
    I vote both. *LOL*

    Don't know Ray... Karl was my chief instructor in EMT school, Jerry moonlights for NAS, his main gig is as a "71" (Paramedic Supervisor) for American Ambulance in Kings County. Mostly we play with the FD boys....very rare that NAS EMS comes off-base to help us with something, usually has to be pretty major. A few months ago we had a single-vehicle rollover off the highway and nearly into the river by the housing gate of the base... NAS FD, EMS, and PD units all came out to help. Was a pretty good, smooth call overall, thanks to the extra manpower.

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    Ray is FD. In fact, everyone I know in Region is fire. So wolf, what did you figure out to do?

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    Default Reserve Ratings

    First, DC is definitely a rate available in on the reserve side. As I am a DC1 and our reserve unit's chief is a DC as well. Second, most naval reservists aren't Seabee's. =-) They make up a portion of the force but the reserves also include air units, medical units, and fleet augment units.

    I was an HM (Which actually is Hospitalman, just because you are an HM doesn't make you a Corpman, just ask a Marine the difference) before switching to DC. And even though I could do more than most EMT's in our local squad, I still ended up going through the whole EMT-B course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pobrien13
    First, DC is definitely a rate available in on the reserve side. As I am a DC1 and our reserve unit's chief is a DC as well. Second, most naval reservists aren't Seabee's. =-) They make up a portion of the force but the reserves also include air units, medical units, and fleet augment units.

    I was an HM (Which actually is Hospitalman, just because you are an HM doesn't make you a Corpman, just ask a Marine the difference) before switching to DC. And even though I could do more than most EMT's in our local squad, I still ended up going through the whole EMT-B course.
    DC1--with all due respect, the old NAVEDTRA manual (HM 3&2) as well as the old Bluejacket's say "Hospital Corpsman"--of course these books are dated late 80s-early 90s. Just as 91B/Medical Specialist changed to 91W/Healthcare Specialist a few years back, it's just a name...names change, missions don't.
    BTW, HMs working with Marines are designated HM(FMF) (FMF=Fleet Marine Force) and attend special schooling to prepare one for life with the Jarheads. To my knowledge, "Corpsman" has never delineated an FMF-qualified HM from a non-FMF'er...I guess I'll have to go look that up now.

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