Thread: squat pain

  1. #1
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    Question squat pain

    Here's the squat workout: 10 sets of 5 reps of the same weight. Increase wt by 5# each day I do the workout. My feet are shoulder width apart, weight on the heel, I stretch and warmup before lifting, back posture is good.

    Problem: When I do a set I don't hurt the 1st and 2nd rep but by the 5th rep I'm in excruciating pain. There is no pain when I go down, but when I push up (extension?) it hurts. The further I go down, the more I have to push up, the more it hurts - IOW more range of motion = more intense pain. The pain feels like it's either at the hip socket or that large groin ligament. There is light, dull pain during daily activities but nothing remarkable. My groin feels tight all the time. I only hurt like this when I do squats; nothing when I do leg presses or stairs.

    I like squats and this workout (found it on a military special forces website) has given me great results in my legs. Hopefully this isn't a sign my hips can't handle squats anymore.

    Any ideas?
    Alan

    As a side note.....
    For those who are interested, this is how my workout is progressing: I'm running 3mi in about 8:45, I'm up to 165# (I was 160 in Feb '06). I've had to increase the resistance on my wt lifting a few times. The hardest part: eating "clean" food

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    Alan

    Not sure why you would be having those pains? Maybe Dr. Jen can help answer. The only pain I get from squats is in my quads where it should be. You should not be getting pains in your hip socket or groin from squats.

    If posture and warm up are good maybe you could try a few different things and see if you continue to experience the pains.

    1) Try changing up your foot placement while squatting. Shoulder width is the norm, but you should also throw in some wide and narrow foot squats. The narrow squats are great for building the outer sweep of the quad.

    2) Try smith machine squats and hack squats. Front squats are also great.

    3) You could try lighter weight with higher reps. Maybe you are squatting too heavy for now?

    Hopefully you can contine to use squats. Really is nothing better for building overall size and strength. Nice work on the bulk. Only 15 lbs. to go!

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    Default Hip...

    The above advice is very sound. Have you tried cycling for 15 minutes as a warm up? This might loosen up the hip and make it more lubricated for the "hard" work.

    I personally don't do free bar squats anymore because they hurt my knees. I use the smith machine and the decline leg press. Different things work differently for everybody. Yet I'd hate to see you give up on such an effective exercise.

    I don't like to say this, especially on the internet, but, it might just work for you. Have you had your hip socket adjusted? It might be fixated, and not moving properly in that part of the range of motion. Do you use a chiropractor? Where are you? If you need a referral to one in your area, I might know someone who knows someone. I adjust athletes' hip sockets all the time, and they get GREAT results. It would be worth a try. This shouldn't take more that 2 or 3 adjustments if done well. If you know someone, and they are not familiar with the traction/automatic prioirty type of hip socket adjustment, I would be happy to describe it to your doc. They can write me at drjmilus@gmail.com.

    Hope this helps...

    Dr. Jen
    www.fireagility.com

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    Default Hip Pain

    I agree with the Doc, the hip alignment needs to be addressed as well as the rest of your posture. My analogy is that you are a car out of alignment that is being run too hard. The approach I take is to assess the postural alignment, then re establish postural alignment & hip range of motion.Then tracking ( how the hip track in all of it's non weight bearing directions) then begin bodyweight ROM and tracking and increase the demand on the hip and THEN begin weights. There is no quick fix, this will take work on your part but it needs to be guided properly to make lasting changes. Realignment is needed but what caused it in the first place? And if it is a muscular imbalance causing it then that needs to be corrected

    The fact that it is squats that cause the pain and not smith rack tells me that lateral stability and or ROM may be an issue since the free squat requires more stabilization by your hips rather than a rack or machine. Too many people take on weights before they are ready and cause/re-enforce bad muscular patterns. Proper training BEFORE starting a squat program like this is crucial. We have an effective screening we do with clients to insure they aren't training more than what their body is ready for. Contact me for more info.

    www.adapttraining.com

    ogomez FF/PT/PFT

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    Default re squats

    I would try stretching more maybe, I recently agravated my L5 disc by doing squats w/o stretching enough, my chiropractor told me I need to stretch for at least 15 minutes followed by warming up....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drjmilus
    The above advice is very sound. Have you tried cycling for 15 minutes as a warm up? This might loosen up the hip and make it more lubricated for the "hard" work.

    I personally don't do free bar squats anymore because they hurt my knees. I use the smith machine and the decline leg press. Different things work differently for everybody. Yet I'd hate to see you give up on such an effective exercise.

    I don't like to say this, especially on the internet, but, it might just work for you. Have you had your hip socket adjusted? It might be fixated, and not moving properly in that part of the range of motion. Do you use a chiropractor? Where are you? If you need a referral to one in your area, I might know someone who knows someone. I adjust athletes' hip sockets all the time, and they get GREAT results. It would be worth a try. This shouldn't take more that 2 or 3 adjustments if done well. If you know someone, and they are not familiar with the traction/automatic prioirty type of hip socket adjustment, I would be happy to describe it to your doc. They can write me at drjmilus@gmail.com.

    www.fireagility.com
    I cycle, walk up a 6 floor tower, and do about 20x leg presses @ 150#. I stretch, but not 15 minutes worth. I try to keep my knee bend at a 90 degree angle to keep from over-flexing? my knee joint. So I don't go down all that far when squatting.

    I live in San Angelo, TX and I do have access to a chiropractor. I'll check into that and pass along the information ya'll gave me.

    Thanks for all the help and advice. I wouldn't doubt my hip (or anything else) is not aligned properly. My paternal grandfather has had both knees and both hips replaced. He and I are built the same.

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    Default OGomez has a great point

    about hip alignment and posture. Ok, Ok, a quick hip adjustment would make alot of younger people feel better. But, as I should have said before, why is there a problem? A good Chiro or PT would be able to do the manipulation. BUT, leaving it at that might allow it to come back.

    "Just stretching" might not be good enough. Sometimes people need to stretch unilaterally, or unevenly. For example, people with pelvic torsion often have one hamstring that is tight (short) and the other quad that it tight (among other things) and figuring out what is really going on structurally can allow the muscular imbalances to be worked with ON YOUR TIME. By that I mean, no doc or PT can see you as many times or as frequently as you can do SPECIFIC stretches or strengthening exercises to fix your own imbalances.

    Sorry I forgot to say that....

    Dr. Jen
    www.fireagility.com

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    Default Squat pain....

    You wouldn't happen to be a cowboy, would you?






    Take your spurs off.....
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    Exclamation

    I may be a Texan, but not a cowboy

    I did squats again today. I spent more time warming up and stretching prior to lifting. I noticed something interesting: when going up with the bar, I noticed my hips tended to rock side to side, as if they were wobbly and unsteady. That's when I experienced pain. After that, I made a point of making sure my hips didn't rock. When my hips were steady, I didn't experience any pain. So for some reason, my hips want to rock when I stand up and when they do it hurts.

    Regarding the weight: I only squatted 195# today. I've done considerably more than that with no joint pain.

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    Default joint pains

    Ya, me had it too. I was suffering like crazy and didnt know what to do.Took some painkillers to give me some relief from the pain but that was all temporary. I finally went to an ortho who after some prelim tests put me on generic tramadol.. This did help me gradually and started feeling better to get to the gym once again. We have to keep ourselves fit so that we can take all the pressures of our work.

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    Default update

    Went to the chiropractor yesterday. Actually I went due to sacroiliac back pain but I think the two are related. After asking me questions he did some adjusting on my leg/spine. Then he ran this vibrating pad everywhere. He then had me get sideways and did some more adjusting. He said with a few more adjustment everything should be as good as new. No back pain or hip pain.

    I noticed, after posting this thread, that when I'm pushing up my pelvis wobbles. This wobbling coincides with the hip pain. I have been working on making sure my core is stable and I don't wobble when pushing up the weight. That has helped, plus stretching.

    The back: an old muscle/connective tissue strain from 2000 when I was doing landscaping. Pain radiates down both hamstring, and is made worse when sitting, and then when I stand after prolonged sitting; relieved by lying flat on my back or standing upright. It only hurts after I've done a lot of manual labor that involves my back - fireground, construction, etc. My back was a problem during fire academy because we did a lot of core-building workouts.

    Both problems are probably due to an instable core.

    The Dr prescribed ice often. No soft furniture. No working out including running for at least as long as he's treating me. Later, we'll see how I'm progressing, I guess.

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    Thumbs up a better way to squat

    Great Information!

    There's a lot of controversy over the squat. There's seem to be some confusion as to whether it's the best exercise or the worst. Done incorrectly, it can sure do some damage, but let me share a few ideas that might help.

    First of all, be aware that body builders and power lifters take a much different approach to weight lifting, especially when it comes to an exercise like squats. Most of us are only exposed to the body building mentality. That's a real shame in the fire service, where function and form are king.

    A body builder's squat features a lot more quad (front thigh) and (knee) patellar tendon stress. What's really important is to activate the glutes and hamstrings, especially getting the glutes to fire hard when it comes to hip protection. The glute attachment point is way up on the femur, assuring a proper alignment of the femur head in the hip socket as you raise and lower.

    To learn how to squat correctly, advanced strength coaches sometimes employ an exercise known as the Box Squat. To activate the glutes try squatting with a box (or sturdy bench or chair). Stand with your back to the box (heels about a foot out). Assume a nice wide stance. Feet can be pointed out as long as the knee tracks over the toe when lowering.

    Bring tension into the abs and tighten the glutes. Place your weight on your heel and keep your back straight and chin up.

    Sit BACK, not down, keeping your head up, back straight and SHINS AS VERTICAL as possible. This type of squatting puts tremendous load on the glutes (largest muscle in the body). You'll need to thrust your arms way out in front of your body for balance as you sit back and down.

    Just tap the box with your butt, which should be set at about knee level or higher to start. This set up should result in your thighs getting to about parallel to the floor or slightly higher. Start with the box as high as necessary to keep back straight and prevent knee pain. Work on progressively lowering the depth of squat.

    The box should be sturdy enough that if necessary, you can transfer your weight to it before rocking forward and standing up. Lock out hips and knees and get ready for another rep.

    Breathing should be natural and not forced. Before lowering, take a deep breath and brace the abdominals. This should feel like your bracing for a punch. Using your thigh muscles, pull yourself back and down as you squeeze out some air. At the very bottom of the movement, release the rest of your breath, inhale, and again, release some air as your return to a full standing position with knees and hips locked out.

    Start with low reps and sets (IE: 2 sets of 5 reps) and work up to 4 or 5 sets of 10 to 12. Every fourth week, reduce reps and sets for one week then continue at a slightly higher resistance (hold dumbbells or lower box height) and work on increasing reps and sets.

    This should help,
    Captain Mike
    www.firefightersworkout.com
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    Last edited by MikeStefano; 08-14-2006 at 08:45 AM. Reason: add image

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    Talking another update

    No Pain!!!

    I had a few more adjustments by the chiro. I also have been doing some recommended core building exercises. Best of all I've been able to get back into my squat workout.

    Thanks for all the advice. I'm saving this thread on my comp should I need it again
    Alan

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