1. #1
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    Default Reverse roof removal (windshield hinge)

    I'm just wondering if anyone is using the reverse roof removal technique, using the windshield as a hinge?

    If you're not familiar, it involves cutting the B and C pillars first, and then cutting the A pillars w/o taking out the windshield. Then, you fold the roof forward, over the hood, and use the windshield as a 'hinge' to control and hold the roof better while it is being rolled out of the way.

    The primary advantages are: 1) reduction of windshield removal related injuries and patient anxiety; 2) faster than windshield removal; 3) easier control of roof when being removed (especially if understaffed); and, 4) still allows excellent lateral and aft access to patients.

    Anyone try this? Any positive/negative experiences?

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    Only great experiences with it. Obviously advantages using this technique.
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
    BIG RIG RESCUE

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    Used this method several times. Its very quick, does'nt spook the casualty/casualties with saws and glass dust and means less crew to hold up the roof. (We normally ride with 4).
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

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    Common procedure we use on my Dept, For added safety you can stuff a disposable blanket in between the dash and lower part of the windshield to ensure almost no glass fragments fly around when you flip it over on to the hood.
    The key is to make your cuts as low on the A-pillar as possible and try and stay inline with the bottom of the windshield. I have found that if you have time to use a Recip to make the cuts, it is a little cleaner than a Hydrualic cutter. One more important point to mention is when you are ready to flip the roof over and just about vertical point you must hold the weight of the roof up otherwise the windshield will take the weight and just fold in on itself and glass splinters will be the result.
    This procedure can also be done when the car is pancaked on its roof, the difference is the cuts are made at the top of the A-pillars in line with the windshield.
    Ensure vehicle is stablized, cut B and C posts make final A-pillar cuts with cutters so you have a space big enough to insert spreader tips. Spread the A pillar and the roof apart which will then leave the windshield attached to the vehicle. The roof can now be removed.

    Just another tool for the box.

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    Have done it...works well.

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    I use it as often as I can...works well...but as mentioned make sure there are enough people on the roof when it gets vertical, because it likes to drop down toward the victim when the windshield breaks, be sure to support it. After the roof is sitting on the hood it doesn't take much to pull it all the way off if needed.

    Safety First..

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    Thumbs up We call it a roof flap forward downunder

    This is avery useful technique. Some of the things we do, that may not have been mentioned are before making any cut we first of all place a vinyl sheet about the size of the windscreen on the inside of the windscreen. It is held in postion by plastic claps, fashioned by ripping 90mm PVC pipe down one side to form a C, over the A pillar. The sun visors can also be used to hold the top of the sheet in place. This helps protect the patient from glass fragments during the glass management stage of the operation. The front windscreen is then cut utilising a saber saw, shaving cream can be used to minimise glass dust. Speaders are then used to press the A pillars flat to form a hinge that the roof can fold forward on. Next the C and B pillars are cut and supported. Remember the last cut will be made over the patient to assist with supporting the roof over the patient. Once all cuts have been made the roof is then folded forward over the bonnet. After the roof is folded forward relief cuts are made in the roof behind the A pillars to assist in laying it flat over the bonnet. The roof is then secured with a line to prevent from blowing back into its original position. I hope this information may be of some use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SODeceptionbay
    This is avery useful technique. Some of the things we do, that may not have been mentioned are before making any cut we first of all place a vinyl sheet about the size of the windscreen on the inside of the windscreen. It is held in postion by plastic claps, fashioned by ripping 90mm PVC pipe down one side to form a C, over the A pillar. The sun visors can also be used to hold the top of the sheet in place. This helps protect the patient from glass fragments during the glass management stage of the operation. The front windscreen is then cut utilising a saber saw, shaving cream can be used to minimise glass dust. Speaders are then used to press the A pillars flat to form a hinge that the roof can fold forward on. Next the C and B pillars are cut and supported. Remember the last cut will be made over the patient to assist with supporting the roof over the patient. Once all cuts have been made the roof is then folded forward over the bonnet. After the roof is folded forward relief cuts are made in the roof behind the A pillars to assist in laying it flat over the bonnet. The roof is then secured with a line to prevent from blowing back into its original position. I hope this information may be of some use.
    I like the use of shaving cream. Nifty trick.
    Fir Na Tine
    Fir Na Au Saol

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    Is anyone using the forward roof flap, but using the roof line as the hinge, not the windscreen.
    Cut the C and B pillars leaving the A intact, then place two cuts in the roofline just behind the A pillar attachment to the roof. Use a crowbar to dent the roof down and flap the roof forward onto the hood / bonnet area leaving the windscreen intact. Rope or tapes are often attached to the C pillar stubs and used by crew members at the front of the vehicle to assist with a steady transition from the lifting to vertical position and the laying down of the roof flap on the hood.

    Removes the hazards from glass dust to both rescuer and patient.
    With open fractures trapped under the dash you would have to be very careful to stop glass shards filtering down from the dash area as the rescue progresses. I am yet to be convinced that your tarp, plastic sheet arrangements provide enough protection from the superfine dust produced by cutting the windscreen. The distance that I have recorded glass shards spray into the interior of the vehicle during these windscreen folds is concerning for both patient and interior rescuer safety. The chopping the windscreen with an axe as it folds is also pretty disconcerting when you are inside the vehicle.

    The metal left across the roofline also supports the weight of the roof which reduces the manual handling risk on the team members controlling the roof roll. It also eliminates the risk of the roof guillotining down onto the patient or rescuers as the roof passes that vertical point and the glass in the windscreen lets go.

    You can then complete the full removal when the roof is on the bonnet and supported during the removal cut.

    Why is it so important to remove the roof totally, I am interested in your reasoning. This technique generally sees the roof section tied down across the hood / bonnet area and left attached.

    The patient can then be removed towards the rear of the vehicle using a KED as a slide to assist with moving the patient up the spineboard and out over the rear parcel shelf. Again rescuers outside the vehicle can assist with a rope through the handle on the back of the KED to assist those in the vehicle with some of the weight during the lifting/slide out of the vehicle.


    I know you love to cut stuff but does anyone have ideas why this technique is better or worse than full roof removal.

    Have some photos I can email if anyone is that interested.

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