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  1. #41
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    Default Crosslays

    Bumper line: 100' 1 1/2" for car, dumpster and trash fires (yellow hose)
    Preconnect 1 is a 150' 1 3/4" with a combination nozzle (red hose)
    Preconnect 2 is a 200' 2" with a vindicator nozzle (blue hose)
    Preconnect 3 is a 200' 2" with a combination nozzle (blue hose)
    Rear is a 250' 2 1/2" with stack tips (brown hose)

    Give your crews the tools to do the job, the training to properly operate them and then let them make the decision on what to pull.

    We are also forunate to be able to carry both a 5 and 6" supply hose for larger incidents.


  2. #42
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    Default How I heard the lenghts were developed.

    Just a comment on how the cross lay line was told to me. The cross lay concept was developed for your normal 2 1/2 story bedroom community. This concept applies to about 80% of America.
    The front of the fire building belongs to the Truck. We Enginemen concede the front since we get to actually put out the fire and their ladders are limited in length. Since the ladder has the front of the fire building the engine parks one house adjacent to the fire building in either direction.
    One 50'length of hose is used to go from the spot where the engine is parked, down the street to in front of the dwelling. The second 50' length of hose goes from the street to the front of the dwelling. The third and fourth lengths are the interior operational lengths, one hundred feet of hose is usually enough to cover all areas of a standard dwelling.
    As the line is stretched the distances are usually shorter than the preset lengths. That extra approx. 20 to 30 feet of extra hose, when properly stretched gives you additional interior operations length.
    The cross lay design works 80% of the time in normal America. If the fire conditions or building design requires more hose then what the cross lay can give the stretch should come off the back. Allot of engine utilize the reverse lay. The reverse lay is 150' of 1 3/4 hose reducer adaptered from a 2 1/2 hose lay of 500' to 750' depending on your response area needs and distances between hydrants. The Reverse Lay allows the engine to drop in front of the fire building and proceed to the hydrant.
    The design of the cross lay has exact lengths for a reason. making the lay 250' or 300' defeats the ability of a minimum manpower hose line stretch. I guess a 300' cross Lay could be an option if all your homes were set back over 100' with large front lawns. But that's not norm. If your district isn't made of McMansions or 6 story "H" types, I think the saying "if it ain't broke don't fix it." applies here.

  3. #43
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    We looked at our community and our buildings and set-backs to determine preconnect lengths. We do not run a truck company and our standard operating guidelines have the first engine position in the most advantageous position for a quick attack on the fire using pre-connects if possible from tank water while a water supply is being established.

    We found that 200 feet would handle about 90% of our calls, but that we had places where that would not be enough so we added 300 foot preconnects too. We also added a 500 foot 3 inch apartment line in the hosebed with a wye and 100 feet of attack hose attached.

    We do not use 1 1/2, 1 3/4, or 2 1/2 inch hose for fire attack. All of our attack lines are 2 inch with 200 gpm at 75 psi nozzles with a 1 1/4 inch slug tip. We underpump the nozzle initially to get 160 gpm at 55 psi at the nozzle, we can of course go to 200 gpm at 75 psi, or dump the combo tip and go to the 1 1/4 slug where we flow 300 gpm at around 40 psi at the tip. This system has worked for us for well over a decade. One size attack line means you never grab the wrong line.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  4. #44
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    Default

    In regards to the 300' cross-lay length, what is the purpose of having such a long length of small diameter hose? I agree that that is too long for a traditional "attack line" or whatever terminology you are accustomed to. My dept services a large rural area with very sporadic hydrant placement, it is not unusual that we lay our entire bed of 4", which is what we use for supply on an "everyday" structure assignment. Now our clientele are far from being able to own "Mansions", but a moderate percent of the time, access is limited, and 200' cross-lays aren't going to do the job. That being said, we also have 200' of 2 1/2 as a "Glendale" load, with a wye on the end, this combined with a 100' high-rise pack we collectively call the "shopping mall", this evolution is the FF bread and butter, aside from just pulling the cross-lay in my dept. I could very well be wrong, and correct me if I am, but the friction loss in the 300' attack line, would be substantially greater than that of the "shopping mall" evolution if deployed, causing the engineer to pump at higher RPM's thus putting greater stress on the engine and pump. although there is a slight bit more difficulty in maneuvering 2 1/2, when the wye is positioned at the door, or just inside the door, a 2 man interior crew can easily search an entire structure with the same ease of a single attack line of 200'. I guess what I'm getting at is there is obviously 100 ways to skin this cat, whatever works for some departments may not work for mine, and the other way around. But it is the duty of us as professionals, to know what we need, what will work, and to use the tools that are provided. I agree, don't reinvent the wheel, just make it work for your situation.

  5. #45
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMCMFD View Post
    In regards to the 300' cross-lay length, what is the purpose of having such a long length of small diameter hose? I agree that that is too long for a traditional "attack line" or whatever terminology you are accustomed to.

    Golly, I guess I'll tell our guys what we have been doing for over a decade doesn't work anymore because you say so. The truth is we can flow 300 gpm out of our 2 inch line, that is technically a medium sized attack line, at a pump pressure of 195 psi. The reason for a 300 foot 2 inch preconnect is that like any other pre-connect it is quick to put in operation and we looked at OUR community and it is what we need for some of our occupancies.

    The funniest part is we flow more through our 2 inch at the maximum flow than most FDs flow through their 2 1/2 and the 2 inch is far easier to move with limited staffing than a 2 1/2.


    My dept services a large rural area with very sporadic hydrant placement, it is not unusual that we lay our entire bed of 4", which is what we use for supply on an "everyday" structure assignment. Now our clientele are far from being able to own "Mansions", but a moderate percent of the time, access is limited, and 200' cross-lays aren't going to do the job. That being said, we also have 200' of 2 1/2 as a "Glendale" load, with a wye on the end, this combined with a 100' high-rise pack we collectively call the "shopping mall", this evolution is the FF bread and butter, aside from just pulling the cross-lay in my dept.

    Your "glenadale load" would be almost worthless here. If we can't reach it with a 300 foot preconnect, we are going to our "apartment lay" which is 500 feet of 3 inch (more water at less friction loss than 2 1/2) with a gated wye with 100 feet of 2 inch attached. We carry another 100 foot bundle on the rig to either extend the first 100 feet or to add another 100 foot line. This system works for us because we have buildings that we need every inch of that 500 feet to get to the backside of them, some we need part of that 500 feet to get deep into the building with an attack line.


    I could very well be wrong, and correct me if I am, but the friction loss in the 300' attack line, would be substantially greater than that of the "shopping mall" evolution if deployed, causing the engineer to pump at higher RPM's thus putting greater stress on the engine and pump.

    The pump pressure for our 300 foot pre-connect flowing 300 gpm is 195 psi. That is well within the capabilities of a well maintained, properly designed, modern pumper. If it's a problem I suggest some training, better maintenance or perhaps a new rig.

    although there is a slight bit more difficulty in maneuvering 2 1/2, when the wye is positioned at the door, orwell within the capabilities of a modern pumper. If 19e just inside the door, a 2 man interior crew can easily search an entire structure with the same ease of a single attack line of 200'. I guess what I'm getting at is there is obviously 100 ways to skin this cat, whatever works for some departments may not work for mine, and the other way around. But it is the duty of us as professionals, to know what we need, what will work, and to use the tools that are provided. I agree, don't reinvent the wheel, just make it work for your situation.

    We do know what we need. We looked at our community and we specced our new engine for 2 inch preconnects. We set friction loss standards at specific flows for our engine that the manufacturer had to meet. Because of our larger buildings and set backs we specified both 200 and 300 foot pre-connects.
    The thing that makes us believe this is working well is there is no one asking to go back to 1 3/4 and 2 1/2 hoselines. Is it for everyone? No, it probably isn't but the truth is that isn't our concern, our concern is what works for us.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 12-09-2013 at 06:03 AM.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  6. #46
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    It seems as if you took offense to my post, I apologize for that I wasn't intentionally questioning your operations or the way your and yours. I was simply responding, in or did I question whether or not your guys know what they need for your community. So again sorry if you were offended, Take it easy sir, were all on the same team.

  7. #47
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMCMFD View Post
    It seems as if you took offense to my post, I apologize for that I wasn't intentionally questioning your operations or the way your and yours. I was simply responding, in or did I question whether or not your guys know what they need for your community. So again sorry if you were offended, Take it easy sir, were all on the same team.
    Actually go back and read your original post. You did indeed question what we do. Yes, I did take offense at your tone. We did nozzle testing, hose testing, specifically specced flows and acceptable internal piping friction losses on our engine, and we practice with this set-up so that it works smoothly and efficiently for us. We didn't just buy pretty hose and cool looking nozzles without research and testing.

    By the way, there are other firefighters on here that talk about their FDs running 400 foot 1 1/2 inch pre-connects. There is a great big world out there and like you said there are 100 ways to skin a cat and not all of them may be familiar to you.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  8. #48
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    As I said before, I am truly sorry for being offensive, I was simply making statement, I was not in any form intentionally questioning your department. I must have miss-read your original post, I didn't realize that was in use with your department, take it for what its worth, I meant no ill will when responding.

    And patronizing is not needed, I am well aware that there is a great big world out there and things are done that I have no knowledge of, I read these forums to learn, not criticize, who am I to question another department, not my intention what so ever.

  9. #49
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMCMFD View Post
    As I said before, I am truly sorry for being offensive, I was simply making statement, I was not in any form intentionally questioning your department. I must have miss-read your original post, I didn't realize that was in use with your department, take it for what its worth, I meant no ill will when responding.

    And patronizing is not needed, I am well aware that there is a great big world out there and things are done that I have no knowledge of, I read these forums to learn, not criticize, who am I to question another department, not my intention what so ever.
    Then let's move on.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  10. #50
    Forum Member Snarff's Avatar
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    The hose on our truck
    We run 100' of 1 3/4" off the bumper with a roll of 50' dead behind it
    Two 200' of 1 3/4" cross lays (above the pump panel)
    300' of 1 3/4" coming off the back in the hose bed.
    600' of 2 1/2" dead lay in hose bed

    The 300' pre-connect is a really new thing for us about a a year and a half we have been running it. We never had the option for it before due to the older trucks layout.

    We had many apartments that are 3 story and depending on where the curb was a 200' cross lay would not make it to a 3rd story apartment. So guys either had to add lengths of hose to make the stretch or use something like 2 1/2" or 3" to a high rise bundle. Its also nice just to have as an option when in doubt of the length of a stretch just pull it. Its much better to pack up an extra 100' after an attack then trying to add it before.

    Our 300' is not for some shopping center or mall. We do have a mall and many large shopping centers. For that we carry 600' dead lay of 3 inch with a gated wye on the end to connect smaller attack lines.
    Last edited by Snarff; 12-11-2013 at 08:54 AM.

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