Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 38
  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    5

    Question Hydrant cap chains

    A nearby city has decided to remove the chains linking the caps to the body of the hydrant. Their reasoning is sound in that the chains tend to bind after several coats of paint and from rust. Is this a common practice and does NFPA or any other fire code address placement or removal of chains?

    Thanks!


  2. #2
    Forum Member Chauffeur6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Metro NY
    Posts
    613

    Default

    I'm not sure of what standard (if any) would require the use of chains, but they are a pain in the butt sometimes. They definitely do bind up and impede getting the cap off quickly. On a few occassions, I've had them so bad I actually had to cut them myself with a bolt cutter just to get the thing open.

  3. #3
    Forum Member VinnieB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    On the couch in my skivvies
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    When we are out doing hydrants or ever come across a chain on a run...we break it. As chauff said, the chain impeeds quick removal of the cap. We also only put the 4" cap (if there is one) back on with only a few turns...same reasoning...when I get to the hydrant, I should only have to give it a quick hand over hand twist and the thing should fall off. I can't speak for the rest of my job, but this is what my company does.
    IACOJ Member

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    644

    Default

    The chains are there mainly to prevent theft. Steal enough caps and you'll have quite a bit of scrap metal to sell.

  5. #5
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Penn Valley, Ca
    Posts
    571

    Default

    We don't remove chains. They have not been a problem here I suspect because we are rural and hydrants don't get too much abuse from cars and people slamming things into them and bending the chains.

    But Vinnie brings up a good point, a pet peeve of mine., people who wrench the caps down when done with the hydrant.

    I only put caps on hand tight, when they have been rusting away for a year you want to still be able to get them off without jumping on the wrench handle and injuring yourself. But make sure they are on hand "tight" because you don't want unused ones flying off and hitting someone in the kneecaps either.

    Birken

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber mcaldwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Panorama, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    3,022

    Default

    Ours are all gone.

    PITA, and they hardly help anything. We drop an occasional cap in the snow, but at the end of the call, we have all the time in the world to mess with it.
    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

    IACOJ

  7. #7
    Forum Member Weruj1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    7,857

    Default

    as a rule we dont take them off ............also they are now replacing hydrants minus the steamer and going right to 5" Stortz thus eliminating the threaded adapter.
    IACOJ both divisions and PROUD OF IT !
    Pardon me sir.. .....but I believe we are all over here !
    ATTENTION ALL SHOPPERS: Will the dead horse please report to the forums.(thanks Motown)
    RAY WAS HERE 08/28/05
    LETHA' FOREVA' ! 010607
    I'm sorry, I haven't been paying much attention for the last 3 hours.....what were we discussing?
    "but I guarentee you I will FF your arse off" from>
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/show...60#post1137060post 115

  8. #8
    Forum Member Steeda83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
    Posts
    226

    Default

    we hate them at my department(the school kids get paid during the summer months to go out and paint the hydrants..and they paint the WHOLE hydrant)..when we used to check our hydrants ourselves around this time of year we'd just whack the chains a few times to break up the paint..but now it's all handled by a private company, wish they'd do the same for shoveling them

    another department in the area keeps a pair of bolt cutters in their hydrant bags everytime they come across chains and the rest is history..water department gets a little hissy
    Last edited by Steeda83; 09-27-2006 at 08:18 PM.

  9. #9
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Here, There, Everywhere
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    At my current department and my last dept we always cut the chains when we came across them. They don't prevent theft and once the hydrant is repainted...the chains get very gummy and hard to rotate with the cap.

    FTM-PTB

  10. #10
    Forum Member MEck51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    444

    Default

    I have noticed several places that are now using "aircraft cable" to secure them to the hydrant. Seems like a good comprimise. Anyone have any experince with problems with these?

  11. #11
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    2,503

    Default

    As others have said, if my company sees them when we do hydrants, we cut them off.
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

  12. #12
    MembersZone Subscriber ullrichk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Deleted by the forum gremlins
    Posts
    1,663

    Default

    I tend to break the chains when I find them while hydrant testing. More accurately, they break of their own accord when I open the cap. If they're that easy when I'm testing, I can't imagine it being any hindrance to someone wanting some scrap metal.
    ullrichk
    a.k.a.
    perfesser

    a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

  13. #13
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    89

    Default

    All of chains have been removed, reason being, they rust then won't spin freely causeing to bind up and make it hard to remove, they freeze up in winter time, making them difficult to remove at times, we're in a small community so we don't have much problems on theft of the caps.

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you all for your input and information. It looks like several excellent points of view have been voiced on the issue.

  15. #15
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Hate to be the only opposing voice, but here goes. We ensure that all of our hydrants have their chains secured to the cap. When we do hydrant inspections, we make sure that the chains are operable to the point to where they will not hinder the removal of the cap. And, I know it's a freak accident kind of thing, but I have personally seen a steamer port under pressure fly off of the hydrant, striking a firefighter in the leg. (Yes, the cap was on properly, but the bushing failed). I am by no means making any statement as to whether anybody is right of wrong with what they do, I am just saying that this is what we do...

  16. #16
    Forum Member Dispatcher424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    14420
    Posts
    93

    Lightbulb

    Our chains usually come off as we find them. I was always under the impression that the caps were chained to the hydrant so you didn't lose the caps (someone on this thread was talking about losing them in the snow). But to alleviate the problem of lost caps, there is a simple solution: PUT THEM IN THE HYDRANT BAG OR BOX!! If you're worried about caps blowing off of unused discharges on the hydrant, then gate all of the discharges on that hydrant before you turn on the water. IMO you should be doing that anyway in case you need those extra discharges later on, you wont have to shut down the hydrant to add onto it...
    My opinions are my own and do not, in any way, reflect those of any agency to which I am affiliated...

  17. #17
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    40

    Angry

    Quote Originally Posted by HolleyFF241
    Our chains usually come off as we find them. I was always under the impression that the caps were chained to the hydrant so you didn't lose the caps (someone on this thread was talking about losing them in the snow). But to alleviate the problem of lost caps, there is a simple solution: PUT THEM IN THE HYDRANT BAG OR BOX!! If you're worried about caps blowing off of unused discharges on the hydrant, then gate all of the discharges on that hydrant before you turn on the water. IMO you should be doing that anyway in case you need those extra discharges later on, you wont have to shut down the hydrant to add onto it...
    Thank you for your insightful input. Now re-read my post. THE BUSHINGS FAILED. The threaded piping flew right out with the cap. Cause? The bolts were sheared by someone who previously tightened the cap too much and sheared them off. If you could kindly explain to me how adding a gate valve to the end of it will prevent it from flying off, I am all ears. With regards to your opinion, keep it. I get all the water I need out of a LDH hose. If the fire needs more water than I can provide, then it comes from another engine, with another hydrant. That whole "don't put all your eggs in one basket" mentality. The city I protect is very good with regards to hydrant placement, so distance is never a concern.

  18. #18
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    2,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kevmar28
    Thank you for your insightful input. Now re-read my post. THE BUSHINGS FAILED. The threaded piping flew right out with the cap. Cause? The bolts were sheared by someone who previously tightened the cap too much and sheared them off. If you could kindly explain to me how adding a gate valve to the end of it will prevent it from flying off, I am all ears. With regards to your opinion, keep it. I get all the water I need out of a LDH hose. If the fire needs more water than I can provide, then it comes from another engine, with another hydrant. That whole "don't put all your eggs in one basket" mentality. The city I protect is very good with regards to hydrant placement, so distance is never a concern.
    Wow, lighten up a little. Are you really getting that upset because someone misunderstood your point about hydrant chains? And as for you never gating another port on a hydrant - are you saying that there is never a need to feed two engines off of one hydrant??? Our policy is also for engines to get their own hydrant but we also gate them in case an emergency arises that requires that hydrant to supply two engines. Talk about putting all your eggs in your one working hydrant in the hopes that the others are not frozen or broken........... What if THE BUSHINGS FAILED on your second engines hydrant and the next two are frozen? A gate valve might not seem like such a bad idea then.
    I am a complacent liability to the fire service

  19. #19
    Forum Member Dispatcher424's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    14420
    Posts
    93

    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by kevmar28
    Thank you for your insightful input. Now re-read my post. THE BUSHINGS FAILED. The threaded piping flew right out with the cap. Cause? The bolts were sheared by someone who previously tightened the cap too much and sheared them off. If you could kindly explain to me how adding a gate valve to the end of it will prevent it from flying off, I am all ears. With regards to your opinion, keep it. I get all the water I need out of a LDH hose. If the fire needs more water than I can provide, then it comes from another engine, with another hydrant. That whole "don't put all your eggs in one basket" mentality. The city I protect is very good with regards to hydrant placement, so distance is never a concern.
    My post was not a direct response to yours, I was simply answering the question asked by the topic starter as many others have on this thread. With regards to my opinion, if you arent interested in hearing other people's opinions you might be on the wrong kind of website.
    My opinions are my own and do not, in any way, reflect those of any agency to which I am affiliated...

  20. #20
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    40

    Default

    I will gladly apologize to all parties for my post from yesterday, it was at the end of a long day and I should have probably thought a little more thoroughly before I put fingers to keyboard. ChicagoFF, you are right that it is a consideration. Normally, no, we will not attempt to feed two engines from the same hydrant. Having a second hydrant that is broken is always a concern, but here in central Florida, a frozen hydrant is not a very likely scenario. If you are speaking of temperature, at least. On an unrelated note, I would like to contact you (ChicagoFF) in relation to your department tactics with high-rise operations. Our city is getting ready to start construction on some six story townhomes. I know that this isn't normally considered a high-rise, but it is for us since it will be the highest buildings we have.
    Lieutenant/Paramedic

    PTB-FTM

    Leather Forever!!!!

    Semper Fidelis / YAT-YAS

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 23
    Last Post: 08-06-2006, 02:25 PM
  2. SOP's for Volunteer FD
    By rumlfire in forum Volunteer Forum
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-01-2006, 10:35 PM
  3. Finding ISO Department Data
    By 640SATFD in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-11-2003, 12:05 AM
  4. Thermal Imaging SOG's
    By wtfd92 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 06-27-2001, 08:41 PM
  5. RFP's
    By D Littrell in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-2000, 06:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts