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Thread: Gas Pumps

  1. #1
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    Default Gas Pumps

    Saw this video out there about a gas pump fire started from static electricity:

    http://www.i-am-bored.com/bored_link.cfm?link_id=19779

    Anyone else seen or been on anything like this? I'm sure she had a huge pucker factor. Have to give her a little credit for pulling out he nozzel.

    Stay safe,
    DPH


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    Correct me if I am wrong (like there was any doubt that you would ;-) but I was told that pulling the nozzle out was the exact thing not to do. Gas pumps were designed to contain a fire to some extent. Can you imagine pulling the nozzle out if the gas was still pumping. It would create an awesome flame thrower effect. I think moving away from the pump quickly, and activating the emergency shutdown would be the best thing to do.

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    Wow, that's pretty insane. I responded to a call once where the static discharge from an ungrounded plastic container caused a flash fire, but never something like that. I'm sure had she touched the car first and discharged the static it would've never happened. She kept pretty damn calm all things considered.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BVFD305
    Correct me if I am wrong (like there was any doubt that you would ;-) but I was told that pulling the nozzle out was the exact thing not to do. Gas pumps were designed to contain a fire to some extent. Can you imagine pulling the nozzle out if the gas was still pumping. It would create an awesome flame thrower effect. I think moving away from the pump quickly, and activating the emergency shutdown would be the best thing to do.
    Actually, by pulling the nozzle out two things happen. First, the pump should trip and shut off automatically. Second, the vent valve in the fill tube will close, effectively choking off the oxygen supply to the tank itself and cutting off the flames. Yes, if the nozzle is still spewing fuel, it will make matters worse, which is why it's probably best to shut it off yourself before yanking it out. I think had she not pulled it out, the fire would've been much worse if the fuel was still actively flowing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BVFD305
    Correct me if I am wrong (like there was any doubt that you would ;-) but I was told that pulling the nozzle out was the exact thing not to do. Gas pumps were designed to contain a fire to some extent. Can you imagine pulling the nozzle out if the gas was still pumping. It would create an awesome flame thrower effect. I think moving away from the pump quickly, and activating the emergency shutdown would be the best thing to do.
    You are correct, with the nozzle still inside the car you have one fire but when you pull it out now you have two, plus the chance for gas to get loose on the ground.

    If I could get my hand on it like she did, I would first click off the fuel flow before going for the emergency stop but the most foolproof thing to do would be just to go for the big red stop button.

    Birken

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    Well the pump had obviously already clicked off when the fire ignited, so it wasn't going to be spewing fuel anymore (though I doubt she thought of that). But in general, yes, leave the nozzle in the vehicle and hit the stop lever (if possible and safe) or the emergency shut-off which should be located outside the station somewhere.

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    Default Pretty cool customer

    Quote Originally Posted by Firetacoma1
    Well the pump had obviously already clicked off when the fire ignited, so it wasn't going to be spewing fuel anymore (though I doubt she thought of that). But in general, yes, leave the nozzle in the vehicle and hit the stop lever (if possible and safe) or the emergency shut-off which should be located outside the station somewhere.
    Looks to me like she reached in & clicked of the nozzle before she removed it. Pretty cool customer for a girl.(now I did it)

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    I was just waiting.......

    The funny thing is when you think about how often people get gas and this potential exists either by smoking or static electricity.

    DPH

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    It seems to behappening more and more these days, and reports also say it tends to happen more with women, because they are usually the ones that start pumping the gas and then get back in the vehicle while it pumping, they also say if you do this to touch your vehicle to ground or discharge yourself to reduce the risk of static discharge near the nozzle.

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    I doubt it is happening more and more. It is just the one time it does happen, videos and the internet make a huge deal about it so people think it some big growing problem.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    We've had several to deal with,generally when people fill plastic 5 gal containers on those plastic pickup bed liners.And yes,it is getting more prevalent.All the gas pumps around here have written warnings on them but I don't think most people can read. T.C.

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    The filling of the plastic containers on their truck bed is another fine example of darwinism as far as I'm concerned. Especially since, like you stated it's written on the pump.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BVFD305
    Correct me if I am wrong (like there was any doubt that you would ;-) but I was told that pulling the nozzle out was the exact thing not to do. Gas pumps were designed to contain a fire to some extent. Can you imagine pulling the nozzle out if the gas was still pumping. It would create an awesome flame thrower effect. I think moving away from the pump quickly, and activating the emergency shutdown would be the best thing to do.
    I once had a friend drive off with the nozzle still in the truck.

    No real damage to any components as it was designed specifically for this.

    When the nozzle separated, a ball valve of some sort seemed to slide into place which prevented more fuel from exiting the hose.
    What if the hokey pokey IS what it's all about?

    Apparatus Operator
    Salem Fire Department
    IAFF Local 314

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chauffer6
    Actually, by pulling the nozzle out two things happen. First, the pump should trip and shut off automatically...
    Of all the places I've filled up in my lifetime, I can probably count on one hand the number of pumps that actually shut off without constant pressure on a nozzle boot. I would say a good 90% of them will keep running even after removing the nozzle.

    The ones that actually had a very functional boot that could tell when the nozzle was seated were such a pain in the butt, you had to stand on the thing to get the pump to stay running.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    In Florida the Trigger locks have been removed, you must stand there and hold the trigger down or the gas stops flowing. This takes care of the getting back in the car or pulling the handle out without the gas shutting off.
    Stay Safe ~ The Dragon Still Bites!

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    Oh my god, I can't stand pumps without trigger locks. I refuse to go to those stations and if I have to, i jam something in it so I can at least relax my hand while i stand there and watch it empty my wallet.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Yeah, that's partially what I meant about the pump shutting off. I haven't seen a pump with a trigger lock in NY in years. Ever since they mandated the vapor recovery nozzles, they've done away with the locks. Of course, that doesn't stop people from jamming the gas cap in the handle to keep it flowing. I do it myself. But anyway...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chauffer6
    Yeah, that's partially what I meant about the pump shutting off. I haven't seen a pump with a trigger lock in NY in years. Ever since they mandated the vapor recovery nozzles, they've done away with the locks. Of course, that doesn't stop people from jamming the gas cap in the handle to keep it flowing. I do it myself. But anyway...
    That's weird, because I have not noticed that the trigger locks are missing from any of our vapor recovery nozzles. Of course, here in Oregon, they don't allow self-service fueling. It sounds like it could vary from state to state.
    What if the hokey pokey IS what it's all about?

    Apparatus Operator
    Salem Fire Department
    IAFF Local 314

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    Around here (California) there was a time when trigger locks were sometimes removed and vapor recovery nozzles were the norm but then it swung back the other way at least in this rural area and it is now common to find non vapor recovery nozzles everywhere.

    Birken

  20. #20
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    In MA, (well, out here in the sticks anyways) There are NO trigger locks to be found at any gas stations...and signs saying if you "jam" the trigger with an object, the attendant will shut your pump off. As for the vapor recovery nozzles, I haven't seen the "press down into filler hole with all your might, and the pump MAY turn on" nozzles in quite a few years...seems like they've been able to upgrade the technology a bit since then.
    The comments made by me are my opinions only, not of the Fire and EMS services I am affiliated with.

    I have lost my mind..has anyone seen it? it's not worth much..but it's mine

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