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Thread: Hale and Waterous Relief Valve Operational Checks

  1. #1
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    Default Hale and Waterous Relief Valve Operational Checks

    Hello everyone,

    I am looking for the manufacturers recommendation for daily / weekly operational checks for pumps that include exercising and inspecting the relief valves. How do you do it?

    We follow these steps (after checking all fluids):
    1. Apparatus on ramp outside station
    2. Put pump in gear
    3. Chock wheels
    4. Open tank suction and tank fill half way to circulate water
    5. Increase engine RPM to 1000
    6. Operate primer
    7. HALE - Turn handle all the way counterclockwise
    8. HALE - Amber light ON (valve open)
    9. HALE - Set relief valve and increase RPM to get 1000 kPa pressure (150psi)
    10. HALE - Increase RPM to build pressure and open relief valve, light on
    11. HALE - Decrease RPM to lower pressure and close relief valve, light off
    12. HALE - Repeat a few times to exercise valve
    13. HALE - Decrease RPM to idle, close valves,
    14. HALE - leave valve set at 1000 kPa???? Different opinions????
    15. HALE - Take pump out of gear and return to apparatus bay

    7. WATEROUS - Increase RPM to get 1000 kPa pressure (150 psi)
    8. WATEROUS - Remove strainer, clean and inspect
    9. WATEROUS - Slowly turn on and off switch to flush, monitor lights
    10. WATEROUS - Replace strainer and turn switch on
    11. WATEROUS - Set relief valve and increase RPM as required
    12. WATEROUS - Increase RPM to open valve, decrease RPM to close valve
    13. WATEROUS - Repeat several times to exercise valve
    14. WATEROUS - Decrease RPM to idle, close valves, turn of relief valve
    15. WATEROUS - Leave set at 1000 kPa???
    16. WATEROUS - Take pump out of gear and return to apparatus bay

    Thanks
    AL RAQUM likes this.

  2. #2
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    Default

    I've got something somewhere from Hale I'll forward to you. I might even be able to find something Waterous. I do see one thing that grabs my attention in your list, though. You won't want to put more than 100 psi (or 10% of your tank capacity, whichever's lower) through your tank fill line (Poly at least, won't swear by this on metal tanks). The reason is that there's a baffle behind the tank fill that you can damage. There should be a sticker on the front of the tank that you can see through the pump access panel that states this if you want to double check me on your particular trucks.

    One thing I've learned is to keep the relief valve all the way down (counter-clockwise, lowest pressure) when not in use. This will keep the valve from getting stuck. From my understanding, Waterous actually recommends the valve be turned off unless in use.

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    Default memory

    I could get the book and look up the Waterous side but one thing is for sure; never try to memorize everything. Keep the book that comes with the pump handy for reference. Don't have a book? You should have gotten one from the manufacturer of the apparatus but if not then Waterous or Hale should be willing to get you one based on Model and serial number so it is correct for your pump. At least you are pro-active in excercising the stuff.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Catch22
    I've got something somewhere from Hale I'll forward to you. I might even be able to find something Waterous. I do see one thing that grabs my attention in your list, though. You won't want to put more than 100 psi (or 10% of your tank capacity, whichever's lower) through your tank fill line (Poly at least, won't swear by this on metal tanks). The reason is that there's a baffle behind the tank fill that you can damage. There should be a sticker on the front of the tank that you can see through the pump access panel that states this if you want to double check me on your particular trucks.

    One thing I've learned is to keep the relief valve all the way down (counter-clockwise, lowest pressure) when not in use. This will keep the valve from getting stuck. From my understanding, Waterous actually recommends the valve be turned off unless in use.
    Hi,

    You can email me the information at gord.roesch@sympatico.ca

    Thanks

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    Default

    MFD,

    I can't speak for Hale but I know quite a bit about Waterous.
    to flush the pilot valve (control valve at the panel).
    Turn the pilot valve to the off position
    Remove the strainer, clean, inspect, then set aside. With the pilot valve in the off position, and the pump in gear (circulating water) increase the rpm's of the truck until 150 PSI shows on the compound guage. When you achieve that pressure, put your hand over the hole where the strainer goes, and turn the pilot valve on and off about a dozen times. When you are finished with that, turn the pilot valve to the off position and look in the hole. You should not see any water trickling out ( a SMALL trickle is acceptable) if water is still flowing out of the hole, your pilot valve needs a rebuild. When this is complete, re-install the strainer assembly.

    To Properly excersize the Relief valve (mounted on the pump):
    Turn the large "T" handle counter clock wise until it stops. While the pump is in gear and you are circulating water, turn the Pilot valve to the off position.
    Increase the rpm's until your compound guage reads 150 then turn the pilot valve on, when the pressure drops to somewhere around 70 psi, turn the pilot valve off. When the pressure increases back to 150 psi, repeat the procedure. Do this until you have minimal reaction time on your guage when you turn the pilot valve on and off. If perform these excersizes once per week, you will get long life out of your relief system.

    This information can be found in your pump manuals, and I know if you contact Waterous at 651.450.5200 or go to www.waterousco.com under service info you will also get this information.

    Good luck!!

    NBC

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    Smile Thanks

    Hello all,

    I just wanted to thank everyone who posted information to help me out.

    Thanks

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    Smile Watrous relief quirk

    Because of the patent by Hale, the Watrous relief valve is forced closed by pump pressure. (Hale is opened by pump pressure) If the main relief valve is stuck in the open position it might be impossible to get it to close since in the fully open position you are prevented from building pressure. You might ask how can this happen? Simply by turning down the setting on the pilot valve with the switch in the on position, and then taking the pump out of gear. This inadvertant action will allow the main relief to stay in the open position. Slightly dirty water or rust over a period of several weeks or a month (volunteers watch out) can cause a build up of dirt and corrosion around the o-rings causing the valve to stick. The next time you answer a call, your department will experience problems developing the desired pressure at the pump and most probably will only reach 70 to 100 psi even at full throttle.

    Avoid this by: 1. Turn down throttle to idle 2. Turn off pilot valve handle and raise rpm until you reach at least 150 psi. 3. Return throttle to idle and disengage pump 4. Return pilot valve pressure setting to zero or where ever your department says it should be set. Our internal policy is to take the pilot to zero to reduce pressure on the spring and needle valve. Incidentally on every Watrous pilot I have ever operated about 21 half turns is 150 psi. and 24 half turns is 180 psi. Since our SOG is for the preconnected 1 3/4 W/ automatic nozzles to be operated at 180 psi. the pump operator can make the 24 twists of the handle and snap it on before charging the line on command. A word of caution, the only way to learn about your pumps is to operate them on a regular basis, so use every opportunity to keep sharp. Your ability and knowledge might keep somebody on the end of the line safe.

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    Default Need to "Eat a little CROW"

    Over the week-end, I had the good fortune to work with an "OLDER" Pierce engine with a Watrous pump & a relief valve. Turned out that the pilot needed 26 turns to reach 150 PSI set point. Ya always look like a CHUMP when Ya say I NEVER SAW.." .. ". Had to revise my advice. Try setting the relief where you want to operate, and then count the number of turns back to zero. Then you will know for sure on that particular pump.

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