1. #1
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    Default carrying tools into structures

    Recently, I noted a firefighter who carries his axe or halligan by slipping it under the airpack strap at his shoulder, and slings it behind his back and it rests within the shoulder strap and his shoulder blades. The handle of the tool rests along side the air cylinder. The reason for this according to the firefighter was ease of deployment and storage, and it didnt get tangled up in his feet while moving around on the fireground or crawling on the ground in a fire.

    I am sure that the airpack manufacturer would say that this is not what the airpack straps were designed to do...however, we have all seen it done nonetheless. Are there others that stow hand tools on their back like this, and did you determine any pros or cons for the procedure? Also, has anyone done this and then quit because of an adminstrative policy or problem resulting from the storage of the tool near the airpack?

    Let me know...

    Michael Cerovski

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcerovskilt
    Recently, I noted a firefighter who carries his axe or halligan by slipping it under the airpack strap at his shoulder, and slings it behind his back and it rests within the shoulder strap and his shoulder blades. The handle of the tool rests along side the air cylinder. The reason for this according to the firefighter was ease of deployment and storage, and it didnt get tangled up in his feet while moving around on the fireground or crawling on the ground in a fire.

    I am sure that the airpack manufacturer would say that this is not what the airpack straps were designed to do...however, we have all seen it done nonetheless. Are there others that stow hand tools on their back like this, and did you determine any pros or cons for the procedure? Also, has anyone done this and then quit because of an adminstrative policy or problem resulting from the storage of the tool near the airpack?

    Let me know...

    Michael Cerovski
    Personally when working in the Ladder, I use my hands to carry my tools but to each his own. If this guy likes this method...more power to him.

    FTM-PTB

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    At least he carries something.
    RK
    cell #901-494-9437

    Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

    "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


    Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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    some guys stick the halligan in their coat to climb aerials, you have to do what works for you.

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    Ive stuck tools through my waist strap, but never on the shoulder strap. So this goes diagonally? Just having a hard time picturing it.

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    If you take your right shoulder strap and lift it up, slide the butt end of the tool into the strap, rotate the handle over your shoulder and swing the butt end of the tool towards your side, at this point the handle of the tool is parallel to your cylinder, let the tool head slide down and rest near the top of your cylinder. This sounds cheesy, but it looks a lot like a sword sheathed off your back. The handle tucks in next to the cylinder on your pack, the head of the tool sits in a position out of the way, but easy to reach behind your head and grab.

    thanks for all the comments...

    Cerovski

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    While everyone know that there is a "right"way to carry tools,we all use whatever keeps our hands free to do all the chores like turn door knobs,feel for heat before opening said door,and the like.
    Though I have a belt to carry the irons and my old department had a hallegan and flathead axe married with straps so you could carry it at "Sling Arms",most folks I ever saw carry tools held them down by their side and made sure not to poke anyone or anything with them.
    Like others have said,whatever works for them.

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