1. #1
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    Default Hydrant operation

    Is this the right operation for catching a hydrant? Im still tryin to get the technique down, so tell me if this is or isn't the proper way to do it, or if there's a faster way.

    1. Grab the supply hose and the hydrant bag off of the engine
    2. Position to open the hydrant facing or closest to the fire
    2. Place the hydrant wrench on top of the hydrant in position to open it
    3. Loop a portion of the hose around the hydrant
    4. Open the hydrant to flush the water out
    5. Close the hydrant
    6. Connect the hose to the hydrant
    7. Open the hydrant to charge the line

    To close it,

    1. Turn off hydrant
    2. Bleed air from the hose
    3. Disconnect hose
    4. Walk it dry


    Let me know if this is the right way.

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    1. Grab the supply hose and the hydrant bag off of the engine
    3. Loop a portion of the hose around the hydrant

    Do these first, then the rest. It allows the engine to leave the hydrant and continue on to the scene quicker.


    PS - we teach our guys to stand opposite the steamer connection on the hydrant when opening it. That keeps them out of the way if the hose decides to blow off due to bad threads etc. Got a good reminder last month when it happened at a drill. Luckily, the guys knew to stand in the safer area.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    I have my guys flow the hydrant before we pull any hose off at all. We have had instances where people have laid a line and then found out the hydrant was bad. Usually did not work out too well.

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    In addidtion to what you have already mentioned, we had to cup our hand over the 2 1/2" port immediately after the supply line was disconnected and hydrant turned off to feel the suction caused by the water leaving the hydrant barrel. This was to prevent freezing water busting the hydrant. You warm weather guys probably don't have to worry about this additional step....

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    Default How to do it?

    Before I start, let me first say that every instructor is different. To quote my instructor: "There can be 1,000 ways to do the same thing......everyone of them can be correct.".

    Unless you are going for national certification, the MAIN things the instructors / evaluators will be looking for is that you do the assigned task with to key points:
    #1 = You do it safely. You violate no safety issues regarding a task.
    #2 = You complete the task. It could be step:1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 4. (Depending on the step).

    If you learn the safety issues regarding each task, you will do fine.
    Last edited by XRaysJL; 11-15-2006 at 05:56 PM. Reason: Forgot to mention the steps.

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    6.5 wait for D\O to give you the word to charge the line.

    dont want to have a bowl of noddles in the hose bed.
    Your a daisy if you do.

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    Default clarity

    How we did it in Kentucky: (at least on my volunteer department)
    After grabbing the end of the hose and hydrant bag(married up so it shouldn't be lost),and looping the hose around the hydrant and giving the driver the high sign to roll off,we'd remove the steamer and the 2 1/2" connection opposite the fire side of the hydrant before flushing it out.
    After that,we'd put the Storz fitting onto the steamer outlet,put a gated 2 1/2 valve onto the same size connection and alert the driver/engineer that the hydrant was dressed and ready to flow water on his command.
    As we should all well know,flushing the hydrant before flowing water to the engine is to prevent rust,twigs,small dead animals,etc from being cuahgt in the impellers.
    You forget once and you'll never be allowed to forget again.BTDT.
    Last edited by doughesson; 11-16-2006 at 01:16 PM.

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    Thumbs up And.............

    Our operation is:

    1. 1st Engine stops just past Hydrant.
    2. 2nd Engine stops short of Hydrant.
    3. Driver of 2nd Engine pulls layout section off First Engine, signals them to go ahead.
    4. Driver connects line to 2nd Engine discharge, charges it on word from 1st Engine Driver.
    5. Driver hooks up to Hydrant and turns it on while his 500 Gal. Tank water is going to 1st Engine.
    6. Driver eases into Hydrant water going down the line to 1st engine, and pulls a small amount off to refill his tank over a 5 minute spread.

    We always have an Engine on the hydrant, we do not charge a line direct off the Hydrant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods
    Our operation is:
    We always have an Engine on the hydrant, we do not charge a line direct off the Hydrant.
    Our policy was to get water on the fire,while someone was hooking the supply line to the hydrant.And he best be quick about it with an 850 gallon tank going 1,500 gpm,if we blitzed the fire first with the deck gun.
    When the hose lines are in use,there's plenty of time as the engineer tells me to refill the tank with the excess.

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    HWoods, a question...while the crew from the 2nd engine is sitting there waiting for the first engine to pull away, do they walk up to the scene and use lines from the 1st engine? And if the 2nd engine is still 2 minutes out, does the 1st engine still sit there and wait? (or does that never happen?)
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by truckmonkey42
    I have my guys flow the hydrant before we pull any hose off at all. We have had instances where people have laid a line and then found out the hydrant was bad. Usually did not work out too well.

    Yeah I did forget about that. That is what they told us as well, open the hydrant before pulling hose.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ACfire1
    Yeah I did forget about that. That is what they told us as well, open the hydrant before pulling hose.
    I agree as well...always check to see that the steamer cap is off all the 2 1/2 outlets are tightly capped and it flows along with getting rid of any debris in the barel before committing yourself. Every few months there is a story on FH.com where this happens and it doesn't look good to anyone.

    Otherwise it seems pretty simple...also you might want to note which way (clockwise or counter-clockwise) your operating nut turns to open the hydrant...just so someone doesn't overtighten and thus break the hydrant altogether.

    FTM-PTB

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    How we teach it, (and I say we because each department probably does it different), is

    Wrap - the hose around the hydrant for a forward lay
    Cap - take the cap(s) off
    Flush - The hydrant
    Gate - put the gate on, if your dept requires it
    Hose - attach the hose to the hydrant

    Wait - for the pump operator to tell you to charge the line

    If you say it fast, Wrap Cap Flush Gate Hose Wait... you can remember it easier.

    This works for us, and is easy to remember.

    Stay Safe

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    Default

    We do it a little differently to speed the process.

    1. grab bag/hose
    2. Wrap (from road around hydrant opposite side from engine to prevent a snag from whipping into the sidewalk/crowd)- signal engine to pull ahead
    3. Mount gate valve(s), which are packed closed on a supply line/open in the bag
    4. Open and flush hydrant, using gate valve to shut off water flow
    5. Wait for signal from engine to charge line
    6. Charge line by re-opening gate valve

    I don't like closing a hydrant once you have opened it (i.e. after the flush). Takes too long, when all you have to do is use the gate valves properly.

    Just works for us.
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    Post Make sure you have water first

    In my village, our water department was ordered by the village board to paint the top nut blue if it works and black if it doesn't. This was in response to the public complaining that when the water department put bags over the hydrants, the voters noticed that there was not a working hydrant near any of our schools. Well that got some people's attention and some money was found to fix at least one hydrant near each school and the village board then ordered the painting of the top nuts.
    The problem for us is that we have those yellow low energy street lights and at night the black and the blue look the same, so we always flow water first before we pull a supply line. The execption to this is that there are few hydrants near our high risk buildings (schools, nursing homes, chemical plant) that we practice on a few times each year, so we know they work. Also, for some reason, we know that the hydrants nearest to our firefighters houses work, too.
    So, to save yourself a lot of extra work, unless you know the hydrant you're at, get water first, then pull the line and go for it.
    "Your spill is our thrill."

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    I agree on testing the plug before pulling the line... It's take little more time but is well worth it in the end... I've seen a step-up driver make this mistake twice (HIT TWO DEAD PLUGS)on the same street... Two engine's and 2200' of dual 3"s and we had water...

    On waiting to charge the supply line we have 5" hose now so if we have good burner we'll start charging the line slowly to help cut down on the charge time...

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    Yeah for some reason though our Officers don't stress checking the hydrant first and then pulling hose, but it has been mentioned. There was a guy on a department the next city over, was a volunteer, that connected without flushing the hydrant. Well whatever got into it destroyed the hose.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ACfire1
    4. Walk it dry


    Let me know if this is the right way.
    Save yourself alot of undue struggling and grab a hose roller when you got to disconnect. Im a big guy and that supply line is hard for me to handle
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    Default Blessings

    To those departments that have hydrants to tap into: You guys (And gals) are lucky! Out here in the "Sticks" we have no hydrants at all. When there are moderate to major fires, we have to use our mutual aid with other departments in the area to start water shuttle (AKA Water supply) operations.

    We set up 450 gallons (And up) portable water tanks. Then water tenders have to go to and from water supply stations to deliver water to us.

    I wish we had hydrants out here.

  20. #20
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    Lightbulb Well...............

    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42
    HWoods, a question...while the crew from the 2nd engine is sitting there waiting for the first engine to pull away, do they walk up to the scene and use lines from the 1st engine? And if the 2nd engine is still 2 minutes out, does the 1st engine still sit there and wait? (or does that never happen?)

    Yes, Our S.O.Ps. provide that the 2nd Engine will provide a continous water supply to the first Engine. Same S.O.P. says that the crew of the second Engine will advance a backup line for the first crew. Logic would say that they would be pulling a second line off the first engine, not their own.

    No, the 1st Engine will drop a line at the Hydrant and stretch in to the Fire Building, position on side "A" and advance an attack line. The second Engine will do what they're supposed to do when they get there. Usually, the second Engine is real close to the first.
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    Quote Originally Posted by XRaysJL
    To those departments that have hydrants to tap into: You guys (And gals) are lucky! Out here in the "Sticks" we have no hydrants at all. When there are moderate to major fires, we have to use our mutual aid with other departments in the area to start water shuttle (AKA Water supply) operations.

    We set up 450 gallons (And up) portable water tanks. Then water tenders have to go to and from water supply stations to deliver water to us.

    I wish we had hydrants out here.

    I live in a rural area too, and we do have a few hydrants here. We'll do just like your department does, especially relay pumping. It seems we'd rather relay pump or draft than catch a hydrant, but we all have to learn on the hydrant.

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    Default

    Thanks HWoods.



    XRaysJL, just think of all the hyrdrant related problems you don't have!
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mdcook
    In my village, our water department was ordered by the village board to paint the top nut blue if it works and black if it doesn't. This was in response to the public complaining that when the water department put bags over the hydrants, the voters noticed that there was not a working hydrant near any of our schools. Well that got some people's attention and some money was found to fix at least one hydrant near each school and the village board then ordered the painting of the top nuts.
    The problem for us is that we have those yellow low energy street lights and at night the black and the blue look the same, so we always flow water first before we pull a supply line. The execption to this is that there are few hydrants near our high risk buildings (schools, nursing homes, chemical plant) that we practice on a few times each year, so we know they work. Also, for some reason, we know that the hydrants nearest to our firefighters houses work, too.
    So, to save yourself a lot of extra work, unless you know the hydrant you're at, get water first, then pull the line and go for it.
    Why don't you place a disk on the steamer outlet so you don't have to waste time even stopping at a hydrant placed out of service months ago. Seems that would be the best option for your Engine ops.

    FTM-PTB

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    Not much discussion on radio prodicols. Our SOG’s require the hydrant man to have a radio. In some areas of our district it wouldnt be unusual to lay 500 feet of 5 inch.
    Fortune does not change men; it unmasks them.

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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by mcaldwell
    We do it a little differently to speed the process.

    1. grab bag/hose
    2. Wrap (from road around hydrant opposite side from engine to prevent a snag from whipping into the sidewalk/crowd)- signal engine to pull ahead
    3. Mount gate valve(s), which are packed closed on a supply line/open in the bag
    4. Open and flush hydrant, using gate valve to shut off water flow
    5. Wait for signal from engine to charge line
    6. Charge line by re-opening gate valve

    I don't like closing a hydrant once you have opened it (i.e. after the flush). Takes too long, when all you have to do is use the gate valves properly.

    Just works for us.
    Something that struck me as unusual (to me anyways) with this post that I am suprised no one else mentioned: You put your gates/adapters/whatever on the hydrant before you flush? We have always flushed before attaching ANYTHING to the hydrant. The thought here is that whatever you are flushing the hydrant to avoid sending into your pump could also potentially damage your gate/adapter/coupling. That water is coming out with quite a bit of force...

    Like you said though, it ultimately is the preference of your department and the person hitting the hydrant how they will do it...
    My opinions are my own and do not, in any way, reflect those of any agency to which I am affiliated...

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