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    Default Is everthing to much?

    I am going to start applying for jobs again soon and was wondering what I should include in my application/resume when it comes to training and education. I am certified Fire Officer 2, Fire Instructor, Haz Mat Tech, etc. and have a BS based on my fire service credits. I am also starting my MS in Executive Fire Service Leadership. Do I include all of it or do I leave out the higher certifications and Masters?

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    Sorry this doesn't answer your question, but where did you get your BS degree. And where will you get your masters? Just curious for myself. Thanks.

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    Include all of it, I say.

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    What type of job are you looking at/for? I'd say use all the certs. and education info. I know it got me my current job....
    "If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigft357 View Post
    I am going to start applying for jobs again soon and was wondering what I should include in my application/resume when it comes to training and education. I am certified Fire Officer 2, Fire Instructor, Haz Mat Tech, etc. and have a BS based on my fire service credits. I am also starting my MS in Executive Fire Service Leadership. Do I include all of it or do I leave out the higher certifications and Masters?
    Being humble is a good trait but when you're going for a job put it all out there man. Just have a good answer ready that addresses why, with your BS and MS, etc., you are going for that particular position rather than pursuing another field. Good luck.

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    Default Sure put it down.

    Understand you're applying for a snott nose rookie position and some of the panel members might not have your educational background. This information should be used as part of your answer for the question "What have you done to prepare for the position". If you try to push it more than that without being asked you risk the chance of possibly causing doubt in just one rater who might think they can put this over qualified guy in a firehouse where they could drive everyone crazy.

    Seen it happen too many times and the candidate never knew why they never got the call.
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    Default Put it down

    When you fill out an application it asks....education and any certifications. Just answer the question. Your not jamming it down their necks. Good luck and "Nice Stamps". (Experience).
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    all of it is very relative and i'm sure you have worked hard to earn all of those certs and degrees. i feel that anyone who has seen my posts knows that i am very pro higher education for anyone in the fire service. put it down, it sure won't hurt you. in my opinion it shows that you are going the extra mile on your own time to make yourself a better person which in turn will aid your department because they will have a very well educated and certified individual with a strong work ethic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptBob View Post
    Understand you're applying for a snott nose rookie position and some of the panel members might not have your educational background. This information should be used as part of your answer for the question "What have you done to prepare for the position". If you try to push it more than that without being asked you risk the chance of possibly causing doubt in just one rater who might think they can put this over qualified guy in a firehouse where they could drive everyone crazy.

    Seen it happen too many times and the candidate never knew why they never got the call.
    Jesus BOB this is one time that I can honestly say I agree with what you are saying." snot nose rookie" is a little harsh but whatever. Having all those certs. and degree's are great but if your looking to get into a bigger dept. Your best bet would be to very quickly learn how to forget everything you ever learned and to act like that was the first time you saw a firetruck. Most places giving a test could care less if you got a PHd. your going to start at the bottom like everyone else. Going into an academy and showing up classmates or DI's because of your experience background can be a very, very bad thing. If anything I would put down the degree's you have but as far as the other stuff like officer 2 ,etc.... don't even bother no one will really care what you were. Most likely you will only get hired how you scored on the exam and through the process anyway. Good luck.

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    Seems like we're talking about 2 different things- what to put on the application, and how to behave at the drill tower.
    Obviously, bragging about how many certs you have when you're a proby won't make friends.
    Listing your education and prior experience on an application or resume is a standard part of the hiring process. Not listing his achievements would be dishonest, right?
    And many departments today use the test as just a way to make a pool of candidates to interview. It's what they see on your app, and what you present to them in an interview, that will result in being hired.

    Good Luck

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    Quote Originally Posted by mitllesmertz1 View Post
    Seems like we're talking about 2 different things- what to put on the application, and how to behave at the drill tower.
    Obviously, bragging about how many certs you have when you're a proby won't make friends.
    Listing your education and prior experience on an application or resume is a standard part of the hiring process. Not listing his achievements would be dishonest, right?
    And many departments today use the test as just a way to make a pool of candidates to interview. It's what they see on your app, and what you present to them in an interview, that will result in being hired.

    Good Luck
    Look you can put down whatever you desire. Is it dishonest to not tell them that you took a fire officers 2 class?? NO not at all. what the hell willl they care considering your probably gonna be hired with guys that were bakers, factory workers, or did not even have a job before this one. In other words you will be no better off then the guy who has no experience at all. The only thing in your favor is that you can hold that stuff for personal advantage. ( you will not be clueless in the academy). You want a leg up in this field join the military. Past experience and degrees dont get you squat with the civil service but being a veteran does.

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    It’s really pretty simple. Put down your education, you have earned it. I would NOT put it as the first thing on my resume. Be humble and make the first part of your resume work experience. Let them go through your qualifications and find it. They will see it, I promise you. Allowing them to find it gives the perception of being humble. Waving it in their face in the interview or on your resume will turn them off.

    Another thing that will turn the panel off is during the interview when you are asked, What have you done to prepare yourself. DO NOT start out with, “I have earned my Masters degree……. I would encourage you to speak of earning your EMT and fire science as well as your community service and physical fitness. And oh, by the way I almost forgot…….here’s a little but about my information.

    I was working on interviews with a fellow who was a Chiropractor. He was tired of his job, lack of benefits etc (you have heard the story a thousand times why people want to change careers). I told him before the mock interview that we did not want to hear about him being a doctor. I shared with him the story of my department hiring a professional hockey player. During his probation the firefighters tied a mop head around a hockey stick to make him feel more at home.
    He kept dwelling on how swell he was because he was a Chiropractor. I finally told him that if being a quack was so great, he was wasting his time in the fire station. He tried to get some association to being a Chiropractor into EVERY answer. I told him that I didn’t want to hear about it.
    He finally got the message and got hired b a quality department.

    It’s all about humility. Your education can hurt you as well as really help you.

    Paul Lepore
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    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

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    Default Thanks

    I just wanted to thank you all for the advice and comments. One of the most important things I will have to do is see what the departments are looking for in their recruitment process.

    clark918, I completed my BS through Charter Oak State College in CT and working on my MS from Grand Canyon University in AZ.

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    Default Military experience?

    Here is another question. I joined the Army when I was 18 and was given a Chapter 11, inability to adapt to military life, discharge. A lot of applications ask for DD-214’s, which I received along with all military benefits. I have never included my DD-214, for one because I didn’t want to insult veterans who were given the chance to serve, and second I was never sure of how the DD-214 discharged worked. Any help with this issue would be much appreciated.

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    Bigft, are you a volunteer or anything, or in the fire service? I just read your first post and notice you have Fire Officer 2, while I am not knocking you on that hard work, as I've taken a Company Officer class as well, I am just saying that one could be up in the air. I had a friend who took a Fire Officer 2 class, Fire Inspector 2 class, and Fire Investigator class and never seen a working fire, well the oral board called him out on it, and they preferred some kind of experience before getting that so I would be careful on that, but all the others are fine, I put down all my classes anyway.

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    ACfire1, I am career industrial fire for the last 7 years, 14 total including volunteer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigft357 View Post
    ACfire1, I am career industrial fire for the last 7 years, 14 total including volunteer.
    The biggest problem I've seen on oral boards with seasoned veterans taking entry level or lateral tests is they can't place themselves in the position they are applying for; that of being a snotty nose rookie. They try to hammer the oral board with their credentials thinking the board will just hand them the job. Their oral board's skills are rusty and antiquated. It's hard for them to remember how it was to be a rookie.

    This is a delicate balance here. Leave your time and rank in your locker. You must be humble, place yourself in the rookie position and build a natural bridge to present your education, experience and integrity to the oral board panel. Without this bridge, you're dead meat. This is not easy for many seasoned candidates. An attitude adjustment is needed. Attitude is a small thing that can make the big difference. Remember the position you're applying.

    The seasoned veteran candidate can roar past any of the other candidates if his attitude and game plan is in place.
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