1. #1
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    Default Picture Scenario Help???

    Hiii everyone,

    I was hoping I could get some help for my English paper. We were given a picture and have to write personal narrative by taking on the life of someone in the picture, that we were given. I am telling the story from firefighter with his helmet on. I have already done all the background of the story and now I'm at the part where the crew arrives on scene.

    I was hoping I could get some info on what the actual process is on dealing with a crash like this, so I can incorporate it into my report. How would this crash be handled if there were people still inside? possibly trapped? Would the approach change if there were a gas leak in one of the vehicle's? Just wondering if I could get information on the steps in dealing with an accident like this, so I can make it as real as possible.

    I attached the picture, and hopefully it will work, but it's my 1st time adding picture so if I mess up attaching picture sorry in advance.

    Thanks for any info or help!!!
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    I will try to give you a quick rundown of what would take place on a typical injury accident scene. Hang on though, because I could get a little long winded!

    On every scene we are first worried about life safety (our own safety, and the safety of any victims), once that is taken care of we worry about incident stabilization (basically solving the problem, in your case that would be stopping the fuel leak, getting the person out of the vehicle, etc.) However, if you have enough people on scene, these things will be taken care of simultaneously.

    So, if we rolled up on this scene, our immediate goal is to check on the victims that you said are trapped inside. To do this, at least one of our firefighters will actually crawl inside the vehicle and start caring for the patients. At the same time, the firefighters outside will lay out a fire hose just in case something would start on fire.

    They will then worry about actually stabilizing the vehicle using wooden blocks or other devices to make sure it doesn't move or shift and injure someone. Also, while that is going on, someone will be working to stop the gas leak, which may be done by clamping off the fuel line or plugging the leak with something. Also, they will disconnect the battery to make sure the vehicle cannot be started, and that nothing will spark and cause a fire.

    Once that is taken care of, they will start to remove the patients from the vehicle, taking care not to twist or move the patient too much in case they have a spinal injury. Once the patient is out of the vehicle that will be strapped to a spine board (hard plastic board...you've probably seen one at a swimming pool) and loaded into the ambulance.

    I'm sure I've missed some steps along the way...this is a very rough run down of what will go on at a typical incident with someone trapped. I tried not get too technical or use any confusing jargon.

    Hopefully this will help, if you have any further questions, don't hesitate to ask. I'm sure others will chime in if I have missed anything.

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    Thanks vfdguy thats exactly what I needed to know ...just one more question...what are some other methods that can be used to stabilize the vehicles especially ones of that size?

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    Well, there are various tools at a firefighters disposal for vehicle stabilization. Cribbing (the large wood blocks and slabs vfdguy mentioned) can be used to shore up under the frame. We can also use chains, attached around the vehicle, or to strong parts of the frame, and then attach the other end to a tree, or the engine or rescue itself. Large rescue jacks can be used. These are basically metal poles, that extend out, with feet on them, and you either set them up in a strong point on the vehicle, or make yourself a hole where you want the jack to sit in with a tool like a halligan. these are then secured, and tightened down with ratchet straps.

    Essentially, anyway you can get that vehicle stable, without seriously endangering anyone, will work.

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    You mean to tell me that this has been on here a couple of days and no one has jumped on here saying that the FF needs complete turnout gear. Oh and don't forget that he needs to trade in those rubber boots for leathers and definitely drop the helmet for a leather lid. Ha Ha

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    I just assumed he was wearing two sets as it was, and that the salad bowl was his second lid, over his leather one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jerry4184 View Post
    I just assumed he was wearing two sets as it was, and that the salad bowl was his second lid, over his leather one.
    Jerry, would that count in his favor if he stopped at all Green Lights on the way to the call??
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    Only if he shuts his lights down as he appraoches the intersection, so as not to confuse the other drivers.

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    I am going to be short and sweet here. I am an acroynm (sp?) type of person. On a T/C (traffic collision) like this, I like to use the structure fire acr. of RECEO. (Rescue, Exposure, Confinement, Extinguishment, Overhaul)

    Now if you have patients, use the threee Ts- Triage, Treatment and Transport.

    Hope this helps. If you need more, PM me...Bou

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    Dont worry about gas leaks, both rigs are most certainly diesel!

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    Thanks for all of the help!!!!

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    GFD09LD255,

    To take you a little deeper into this picture, we need to explain to you that school bus extrication is a lot different than than normal extrication of cars.
    vfdguy, gave you a very good general approach, as he said one rescuer would enter the bus. the first thing this rescuer would do is what we call triage, he would make a quick check of what injuries we had and which ones were life threatening.
    As he said everything is simultaneous, the outside rescuers would be stabilizing the vehicles, the link below will show you some pictures of the struts or poles they were talking about.

    http://midsouthrescue.tripod.com/extrication/

    School buses have many emergency exits built into them, the main one is the back door, We can not tell for sure from this picture but looking at the lettering on the side and the direction of the little door is opening I would say that the rear door is what is involved in the crash, so rescuers would be working on getting the front doors open,(with the Jaws) or every third side window is made to pop out for emergency exits, The idea is to get the least injured out as quick as possible, to not only protect them but to clear the way to care for the injured people. Then we would make a secondary check for life threatening injuries or changes in a person's condition. This can be a challenging task, some may look real bad but others may not look bad yet they may be the worst, the things that we look for is, make sure the air way is open, breathing, circulation or bleeding, this is what we call ABC's it is very important that we take care of these in that order. At the same time we never want to move a patient until we stabilize their spine, this means we must keep their head straight, and their back in line (the noise should be in a straight line with their belly button).

    Back outside, this picture shows two real concerns at the very beginning of the rescue, looking at the truck we know that right where the truck and bus come together there is a 150 gal fuel tank that is no doubt hit, as he said we must get fire protection ready, one of the first things. but this picture shows some of the real challenges firefighters face, as he said the next thing is to disconnect the batteries to stop any sparking from igniting the fuel. Problem! the battery box on this truck is right beside that fuel tank and mashed up into the bus. We must find one of the cables under the cab that we can cut, this is were it is very important that firefighters train in advance if we cut the positive cable we will cause a spark, we must know how to identify the cables and be sure we cut the negative cable first and then the positive.

    While all of this is going on we use what we call an incident commander or IC, his job is to communicate with all the rescuers both inside and out and make sure they have what they need to do their job. He may be calling for more help, more ambulances, traffic control, it is his job to control the whole scene and supply what ever needs we have.

    If you want to go real deep into detail, go to the top of this page and you will find a search button, type in school bus extrication and you will find a lot of very good info on most any part of it you want including pictures.
    http://www.midsouthrescue.org
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    Somebody teach me how to type, five of you answered while I was writing my little 2cents.
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    Lee raises some very good points, even while typing slow (That's OK Lee, most of us can't read very fast), The photo shows two entry points that I can see, Emergency Door, (at back wheel of truck) and a Roof Hatch. Couple of points on roof hatches: 1. They usually have a wire screen in them (Same as a window screen) to keep bugs and stuff out when they're being used as a part of the Bus' air handling system. 2. Most roof hatches will have to be enlarged to admit a Stokes stretcher, Backboard, etc. 3. There MAY be a small fan located in the Hatch to force ventilation, the wiring to the fan will present an additional hazard that must be dealt with. None the less, Roof Hatches serve as an important part of Bus Extrication procedures. Emergency Doors are normally adequate for Boards and stretchers, but the "Popout" windows are not. A big saw can make a window into a doorway quickly, BUT, all safety procedures MUST be followed.
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    Lightbulb Sudden Thought..........

    A few years ago, there was a Chief in Georgia (I don't know where), A gentleman named Dwight Clark. Chief Clark was (is) an outstanding instructor in Rescue, and an incredibly well versed person in Bus Extrication. Anyone know who I'm referring to?
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    A few years ago, there was a Chief in Georgia (I don't know where), A gentleman named Dwight Clark. Chief Clark was (is) an outstanding instructor in Rescue, and an incredibly well versed person in Bus Extrication. Anyone know who I'm referring to?
    He is with Safe and Fast Rescue now, look under Extrication specialest

    http://www.besafeinc.org/

    I am looking for the ppt him and Ron Moore made on school bus rescue it is on here some where.
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    GFD09LD255

    I got your private message but it will not let me reply so if you need anything fill free to go to my website the email address and phone number are at the bottom of each page.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonnyirons2 View Post
    Dont worry about gas leaks, both rigs are most certainly diesel!

    This is a very good point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GFDLT1 View Post
    This is a very good point.
    Let's look at an other side of this, though desiel has a lot higher ignition point and may not be as bad as gas, it is still a fire hazard and with a bus load of kids I am going to treat it as so.

    But here is something to think about, have you ever run up and stepped in desiel on a paved road, Welllllll ! it can be an @ _ _ busting experiance and we are trying to unload a whole bus load of scared kids. I think I am going to deal with the desiel.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeeJunkins View Post
    Let's look at an other side of this, though desiel has a lot higher ignition point and may not be as bad as gas, it is still a fire hazard and with a bus load of kids I am going to treat it as so.

    But here is something to think about, have you ever run up and stepped in desiel on a paved road, Welllllll ! it can be an @ _ _ busting experiance and we are trying to unload a whole bus load of scared kids. I think I am going to deal with the desiel.
    Our SoPs have the first Engine placing a covering line, (normally a 1.5) second Engine* establishing a continous water supply for the first Engine. We would be placing an oil absorbent down on the fuel as well, to improve footing for Rescuers. Depending on the size and spread probability, we would be getting a dump truck load of sand from the highway department as well. An Operation of this size would bring a crew from the Highway dept. to handle rerouting traffic and assist with scene traffic control.

    *Second Engine might not be on the initial dispatch, but an incident of this nature would have the Officer on the first Engine asking for more help anyway, so one would be coming shortly.


    Lee, Side Note: can you post your website url? Thanks
    Last edited by hwoods; 01-14-2007 at 10:23 PM.
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