Thread: Training

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    Default Training

    What do you training officers come up with for your training nights? Our dept dosen't have any fancy training props or anything. We have some trucks and hydrants:P

    Mike

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    Not to sound like a smart *****, but you have all the tools you should need for the most part, unless you are going to do some advanced evolutions.

    Maybe I am old fashioned in this sense, but basics can make the difference in today's world also. Meaning, that if you are not up top par on the basics then the advanced trainings have no meaning of help. You might be able to dunk the basketball, but if you can not shoot foul shots, you will probably have a mediocre career or record.

    Hose lays, hydrant lays, forward and reverse lays, ladders, ropes and knots, scba donning and doffing, scba search and rescue, hand tools, power tools, pumps, water movement, rural tactics, apparatus placement, nozzles, ventilation, and radio commuications, auto extrication, all trainings that do not cost us money other than paying for the equipmen the first time.

    We try to be really good at the basics, and then we continue up the ladder to the advanced evolutions, and we then mix them together. It works real well because we all tend to forget the simple things if you don't do them that often, and for the most part, it is the simple things that will make the department and save lives.


    STILL STANDING!!!!!!!!!!!!

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    Orange has the right idea. Start small work on the basics. Go out to a new home builder building a house. use it for some basic stuff. Black out mask and do search drills in the bays, or metting rooms using the tanles and stuff. Start small and do basics. That is what everyone forgets. just my opinion. Chris
    Chris
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    Galveston FD "The Big House"
    IAFF Local 571
    www.galvestonfiredept.org

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    We try to lay out a six month calendar. We start with the mandatory stuff, followed by the basics and then working our way up from there. The key is to have a a sense of purpose to your training events. Lay out lesson plans, preplan your drills etc...Use what you already have. It takes alot of prep time before the training event and shortcuts will not do you or your firefighters any good. Focus on what the department and community needs are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by orangebuster View Post
    Not to sound like a smart *****, but you have all the tools you should need for the most part, unless you are going to do some advanced evolutions.

    Maybe I am old fashioned in this sense, but basics can make the difference in today's world also. Meaning, that if you are not up top par on the basics then the advanced trainings have no meaning of help. You might be able to dunk the basketball, but if you can not shoot foul shots, you will probably have a mediocre career or record.
    Orange hit it on the head as far as I'm concerned!The basics I feel can't be stressed enough. I set training up a month in advance and we go over alot of different stuff.

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    Default Same Rut

    I get in the same rut when it comes to planning training exercises. I want to ensure we cover the basics, keep it as real as possible, and to keep everyones interest for a couple of hours (often hard to do on Monday nights during football season). Our department isn't much different than everybody elses. From crusty old farts that have been around forever to young folks just a couple years out of high school. 33 men and women on the roster, and if 15 to 20 show up for training, it's a pretty good turnout.

    Does anyone have any schedules or training plans they would like to share? Any innovative ideas on the 'basics'? A personal drill favorite? What doesn't work?

    If you could share some of these here, it would be greatly appreciated not only by myself, but others that are in the same rut. I'd like to see some of what's working for you. Thanks in advance. drbrye@mchsi.com

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    quietone -

    What have you trained in recently? The reason I ask is if you want a specific ideas on a certain training method (Search/Rescue,ventelation,ladders, etc.).
    Please state, everyone has given you some thoughts. If you ask about search/rescue you will probably get many, many ideads that you can fit one that fits your needs. Just a thought...

    T.J.

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    Pretty much a training night in our hall is going too the river,setting up the portable pump,running some water,maybe practicing making advances on a fire etc. Not too much but its usually pretty fun. The odd time we get an old car and cut it up
    If someone with multiple personalities threatens to kill himself, is it considered a hostage situation?

    Ryan

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    Default recent training

    Our recent training has included ladder drills, hydrant connections, rural water supplies (portable floating pumps), a live burn (that was scheduled well in advance and yielded 9 from our department and 6 from a neighboring department), NIMS, ICS, extrication, bus accidents / mass casualty, and storm/weather watching. Some are not that "exciting", but I would like to know what others do to spice things up a little. What works and what doesn't? I have a tentative schedule planned and each training is prepared in advance. Some schedules have been adjusted to coincide with current events. I don't think that our training lacks information, purpose, or enthusiasm by the presenters, I'm just scratching for some more ideas. Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by quietone View Post
    Our recent training has included ladder drills, hydrant connections, rural water supplies (portable floating pumps), a live burn (that was scheduled well in advance and yielded 9 from our department and 6 from a neighboring department), NIMS, ICS, extrication, bus accidents / mass casualty, and storm/weather watching. Some are not that "exciting", but I would like to know what others do to spice things up a little. What works and what doesn't? I have a tentative schedule planned and each training is prepared in advance. Some schedules have been adjusted to coincide with current events. I don't think that our training lacks information, purpose, or enthusiasm by the presenters, I'm just scratching for some more ideas. Thanks!
    Once your people are pretty confident in doing stuff make it a bit more challenging. People get use to doing things a certain way. Do what you need to do to get them thinking and challenge them to work as a team together.Once they're done get them together and go over the rights and wrongs to make it easier.

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    quietone -
    It looks like you have a lot of it covered. It is like dday05 stated keep working and try to make it moe of a challenge and work as teams. I am teaching FF1 right now so my guys/gals are getting plenty of training and they push me to do more and more. They had fun and learned in the process two weeks ago when we did search and rescue in the station. They want to do it again and that is what I want. They get tired of looking at my MUG in front of the class so the more hands on we can do the better. They are already asking when we will start FF2. I, with the hepl of other officers will keep them busy.

    Our department also has a small training budget and when ever there is a class outside the department that we will not have planed at ours they can apply to go to that class.

    T.J.

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    Try initiating competitive drills with the members either individually, or through team efforts. But in that sense do not always put the same people on a team. Let members work with other members throughout the drill. You can make timing drills, down to having another instructor from a mutual-aid department that may be well respected to help judge the drills.

    Video tape the drills regardless if they are one on one training scenerios down to full department drills. Having these videos available allows us to review the mistakes that we are making, and it shows how far we as members have come from the first video to the newest one. It also gives us something to have to utilize during awards dinners and for the websites.

    Keeping members interested and enthusiastic sometimes can be hard to do, but always when given the chance, build up the esteem of the members whether it be on an individaul basis or at the training, or even at a meeting. If you only get 4-5, 6-7, or 8-9 members at a training, train with them. If it is made fun, and if you are not off limits of being ribbed, the members may enjoy the few hours their and if they enjoy it and talk about the training at the station, you can bet others will hear that and want to see what has been so fun that they missed.

    However, be prepared to have the old crusties show up once in a while just to look over what is going on and make their normal observations to the rest of the members. Stay the course and keep plugging away.

    STILL STANDING!!!!!!!!!

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    If you only get 4-5, 6-7, or 8-9 members at a training, train with them
    This is good advice. Don't let a poor turnout one night ruin the opportunity for training. If you had a big, complex drill planned and not enough people show up to pull it off, have another one up your sleeve for a smaller group. Save the big drill for a later date. And talk it up in advance to try to generate some interest.

    You might be able to dunk the basketball, but if you can not shoot foul shots, you will probably have a mediocre career or record.

    Glad somebody mentioned basketball. We did this for a drill one night. During a section of training on SCBA, we wanted to give everyone an opportunity to do some work in SCBA, see how long a bottle would last, etc. So we thought about the old standbys, chopping wood, climbing ladders, etc. Then we came up with SCBA basketball. Both teams take to the court in SCBA and play hoops. When your bell starts ringing, you exit the court. Eventually you'll have one guy left shooting baskets. Gives everyone a feel for how long they can do strenuous work in SCBA, plus it was fun.
    Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
    Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
    Paincourtville, LA

    "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream and I hope you don't find this too crazy is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
    C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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    Great topic and great posts! When you in the station...look all around you...there are training "props" everywhere to utilize during basics drills. You can set up SCBA courses with tables and chairs, use road cones to make courses to practice hose stretches through and around. Contact a local hardware/lumber store and see if they have any old lumber they don't want anymore and build a wall stud simulator. Contact your local school district if you don't have projectors for power points, or to use their buildings for room searches, large area searches etc.

    I love the SCBA basketball...can't wait to see the look on the faces of my students or co-workers when I set up that one.

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    Talking

    Like most of the folks have already said....

    Go with what you got man! You ahve everything you need on the trucks. Get them out of the meeting room and pull the trucks out to do some pump operation exercises. Do drills that cover fireground set up of a water supply operation.

    We do one where the crews don their gear, board the appropriate trucks, set up a portable drop tank, get the draft going for the pumper, deploy the two attack lines and start flowing water off the system. If you have enough people and a good hydrant closeby, break them up into 4 man engine companies and time them attaching the supply to the hydrant and deploying the 2 1/2 with a gate wye and 2 attack lines off that. Competition is fun and breaks the monotony up. It also shows them that you don't have to hurry to get it done quickly
    Tell me, I will forget. Show me, I will remember. Involve me, I will understand.

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    Default Drills and training

    Firefighterclosecall.com has weekly training drills available for free............http://firefighterclosecalls.com/weeklydrills.php
    Great site, good drills. Pick one simple or complex, your choice. But I agree with the majority of those above. Get the basics down so you can do them in your sleep.

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    I agree, that fundamentals are most important. As far as fancy props, you don't need them. I am sure you have some guys that know how to swing a hammer. For our annual SCBA confidence course a few members built a variety of props from lumber. One is a a standard stud wall and a small window, just large enough to be portable, you have to get through the wall or the window. Another is an a-frame with 2 x 6's on edge that you have to crawl up and over the next is a confined area prop. We took the length of our helmets from the back of the brim to the front and made the prop with that height and about 8 feet long, you got to crawl through that. Then an entrapment prop which is 2 to 3 feet tall with telephone wires strong across and dragging the ground. We also use it for our RIT training. A team goes through all those props and then has to bring a firefighter back through. Be creative but keep safety in mind. With those props if someone gets in trouble you can quickly get to them like with the confined area and entrapment by just lifting it off of them. Of course with the entrapment prop you might have to cut some wires. Try and keep class room type training for winter and inclement weather.
    Vintage Firefighter: The older I get, the braver I was.

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    The basics are great but sometimes you need to get FF's attention by changing things up. A couple of trainings I like are the Easter egg hunt. I take plastic Easter Eggs and put scenerio's in them with addresses in our district. This allows them to think about the scenerio in route and also they learn their fire district. Once they find their egg they have a small job to do and then another scenerio with another address. The other training I like is to have the fire fighters airpack up and change their bottles in complete darkness. This let's them know how well they know their gear. I throw a kink in the drill by giving them a bottle that is a little bigger than the one on the pack. Makes them think.

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    There are some things that need repeating even in a years time, but if you break it up and keep it fun it goes a lot easier

    We recently borrowed some 10 foot sections of 2 ft culvert pipe and had people practice leaving the mask on but taking the air pack off, staying on air, going through the culvert with the bottle/harness ahead, and putting the bottle back on when you're through.

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