1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Green Valley, AZ
    Posts
    15

    Default Rubberized Hose....Help

    We are using rubber coated or rubberized hose and are having an extremely hard time with excessive air when we load it. We have to roll it up before loading it or the hose will not fit on the truck. Anybody else using this stuff and how are you dealing with the air?

  2. #2
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    8

    Default Rubber Hose Help

    My department uses rubber 4 inch supply hose and we have the same problem but this is how we solv it. Fold over one end of the hose about a foot from the coupling and hold the fold tight against itself. Use a hose roller to roll the residual water out of the hose. Just before you get to the other end fold the hose over itself and hold the fold tight, then remove the hose roller. What you have just done is create a vacuum in the hose and the thin coating of water that remains on the inner surface will cause the hose to stick to istelf. Now you can couple the end to the piece already in the hose bed but make sure you keep the other end folded until it reaches the bed then you can release it. Start the next shot over using the same procedure. There was actually an article about this in one of the trade magazines about 5 years ago. Don't remember if it was Firehouse or Fire Rescue but it works pretty good. Just a real P.I.T.A. because it is time consuming.

  3. #3
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Bryn Athyn, Pa.
    Posts
    1,619

    Default

    Any time you charge hose it expands. Fabric or woven hose expands lengthwise, so when a supply line is charged, it snakes. Extruded hose expands outwardly, so it doesn't snake. In addition, since the diameter is getting bigger, the friction loss actually goes down a litle. But to get the air out, you have to roll it. We've tried all sorts of tricks, and we have people who tell me just how full of BS I am. But the same people sit there scratching their heads wondering why the last length won't fit back in the bed. You gotta roll it!!

    Stay safe out there, everyone goes home!

  4. #4
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeyKos View Post
    We are using rubber coated or rubberized hose and are having an extremely hard time with excessive air when we load it. We have to roll it up before loading it or the hose will not fit on the truck. Anybody else using this stuff and how are you dealing with the air?
    we use the rubberized 4 inch supply line and out trash lines are rubber get a roller they are fairly cheap and easy to use that should solve your problems, any fire equipment dealer should carry them.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,861

    Default

    There was just a short article in FE about vacuuming the air out of rubberized/lightweight hose to make a compact highrise pack. For the LDH, we roll it and take it home to be repacked from a rolling tray, which eliminates any air.

  6. #6
    Forum Member
    FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    10,028

    Default

    My volly FD has been using nitrile rubber attack hose for almost a decade now in adddition to rubberized 5 inch LDH. We have a hose roller but have found that the mjority of times we can get the air out and have the hose load very flat simply by using the vacuum drain technique we learned from a video produced by I think Angus years ago about LDH.

    If the hose is laid in a down hill position disconnect the hose at the lowest point and either leave connected at the high end or disconnect and fold the hose over. Let the water drain out by gravity or by walking the hose. As the water drains the hose will be sucked flat by the vacuum created as the water drains. Once the hose drains fold over the drain end until you are ready to load it. If the hose is laid relatively flat the same technique can be used but the hose will have to be walked to drain. We used this successfully last Saturday at a controlled burn with both 2 inch attack lines and 5 inch LDH.

    Rolling the hose does work but in most cases is really not necessary if you do what I described above.

    By the way our guys love the fact that after a fire we hose of the debris and just reload the hose. No washing, no drying, no need for thousands of feet of racked hose. In our case it makes them getting back to work much faster a breeze.

    FyredUp
    Last edited by FyredUp; 04-18-2007 at 09:56 AM.

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Paddiegrunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Huntington Beach
    Posts
    113

    Default

    LA County Fire uses both 4" and 2 1/2" rubberize hose, we leave water in the hose when streached out behind the engine and run it over the hand rail so when we are loading the bed the rail squeezes water out and creates a vacuum that sucks out the air

  8. #8
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    710

    Default Ldh

    If you are referring to LDH, we have been using 4 and 5 inch for the past 20+ years. I think we've tried every trick and gadget under the sun. The main thing to remember about LDH is:

    THE BEST WAY TO HANDLE IT, IS NOT TO HANDLE IT.

    When you lay it out in the street, take it back up the same way. If there is an incline, take advantage of gravity. Keep the entire layout connected; the first mistake is to disconnect each section.

    Disconnect and fold over the highest end FIRST to form a seal, then disconnect the low end and watch Mr. Gravity flatten your hose. Right before the last of the water comes out on the low end, fold it over to keep air from re-entering until ready to pack it.

    If you have Storz connectors and conditions permit, have the apparatus circle the block and start re-loading at the hydrant. While the apparatus creeps along beside the hose laying flat and still connected in the street, the hose is loaded onto the truck.

    Advantages: No backing up while people are standing behind the truck during repacking. The hose is rotated since the same 1-3 sections aren't always hitting the street each time you lay a line. When you leave the scene, your truck is in service and ready to respond to another emergency if you get a call on the way back the the firehouse. If you are a volunteer dept., you take advantage of the help at the scene; lots of them disappear on the way back to the station to clean up. If you are a career dept. all the companies on the scene can help take up hose, not just 3-4 people assigned to the truck.

    Another phrase to remember when working with LDH:

    WORK SMART...NOT HARD.
    Last edited by Command6; 04-20-2007 at 08:19 PM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. ISO Company Personnel
    By FIRE549 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-16-2007, 06:15 PM
  2. What a load! FE Nozzles and hose debate
    By imtxff44 in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 62
    Last Post: 10-20-2003, 12:38 PM
  3. RFP's
    By D Littrell in forum Apparatus Innovation
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-08-2000, 06:36 PM
  4. Crosslay Hose Loads
    By JAPFPE in forum Fireground Tactics
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-30-2000, 01:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

Log in

Click here to log in or register