Thread: Just Testing

  1. #1
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    Default Just Testing

    I just received my two notifications about taking the written exam in Knoxville and Nashville, TN. I have no intention of working there because I am still a college student and have one more year, but am trying to gain experience with test taking. Do I tell them I only want to take the written test? What if they did not tell me that I am taking the physical test on the same day and I am totally not prepared? How do I let them know? Help!

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    Yeah, just take the test. What do you have to lose, except a few hours of your time? You might change your mind as you get more involved, too, so keep your options open. They certainly won't mind if you drop out, since they're probably getting a few thousand applicants anyway. Just do it. You'll learn, and there's less pressure.
    If you're really interested, though, just start looking at medic school. And if you aren't an EMT, yet, then get that. Don't even start until you've got that.

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    Thanks! I will take the tests, and hopefully do well on them. I am going to graduate soon and when I do I am going to apply for jobs wherever for their trainee programs and hopefully get on there and if not then take other approaches to becoming a full time firefighter. im pumped though and getting started is sooooo much fun! Thanks for the advice, anything more would be awesome!

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    As stated you can take the tests...doesn't mean you will get the job if you pass them. It can also take a long time from when the written test is until you get the call for the job. There are many steps in between, so maybe if you did pass everything, you could graduate and still be in contention for a job. You can always turn the offer down too, if called.

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    Get your EMT license, and try to work on an ambulance part-time. That'll give you some experience on scene and who's-who in the business. Try to work for a service that does 911 and not just interfacility transport, since you'll be bored to tears and won't learn as much doing IFT - it's the sad reality they don't tell you in EMT school.
    Most departments, especially one's that pay well, are looking for medics. It pays better, there's much less competition, and you're still a firefighter. Besides, being a medic is cool.
    Having your college degree is great. Speaking Spanish, or at least medical Spanish, can help a lot in some places.
    Go to a fire academy - I'd do this after you become an EMT and decide that you really like it. They're only three or four months, usually, and the quality varies a little, but it'll show you're serious and make you even more eligible to get hired.

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    Wink Firefighter Practice Exams

    If you just want practice taking firefighter exams, visit http://www.thefirefighterexam.com/PracticeExam.html There are several links to free practice exams as well as recommendations on firefighter practice exam books. Good luck.
    Jon
    Last edited by Chibe1; 05-04-2007 at 03:23 AM.

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    Thank you so much, I'm on it!

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    Default Take 'em all

    Take every test and interview you can. Of course you're not prepared, but that's how you'll get prepared when it comes time to test for the department you really want to work for. I used to know guys that would wait until they finished school and got all their certifications and/or degrees before they tested. It then took them another couple of years to master the testing process when they could have been doing it all simultaneously. The three things you need are: schooling, hands on training/experience and testing. Good luck out there.

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