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  1. #1
    FLA1786
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default Peroneus Brevis Muscle

    This is mainly to Dr. Jen, but wanted to make it public in case anyone had any experience, or the same problem.

    About 6 months ago after A LOT of running I got pain in the lateral part of my left leg. I hadn't rolled it or anything. If I sat still for too long, I wouldn't be able to put any weight on that leg. After Ice and self rehab, it eventually faded and went away. About a week ago on a Long Slow Distance Run(LSD), I rolled the same foot very minorly and because I wasn't sprinting, didn't really do any harm. After my post run stretch I noticed a little discomfort again in this area. This time its not constant though. It is ONLY on eversion (pulling the outsite of the foot upward--rolling your foot onto its big toe) I have no pain when I run, I have no pain during exercise, only if I evert my foot. I went on to research the anatomy of the lower leg to localize it to this tendon or muscle. Provocation of the pain is on eversion, but theres no pain on plantar or dorsal flexion, nor is there pain when relaxing or walking/running. I would describe the pain as what it feels like when someone gives you a deadleg(punches you right in the quad). It doesnt radiate or reffer and it is localized.

    Any input would be appreciated.


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    portland, OR
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    Cool Possible reasons

    Where is FLA are you? I'm originally from MIA

    One thing I see in my practice are many runners with peripheral injuries, many will start when mileage or intensity is increased. Some will go away after a time then return with a minor incident. I believe that many (most people) will start an activity and just go for it without the body ready for the increase in demand. If you have any weaknesses or discrepancies in muscular balance, any lack of range of motion or postural misalignments then you body has to compensate. I think you have some hip/lowback issues that caused the lower leg to compensate . A weakness in the Glut medius is a common problem where the lower leg has to work overtime when the hip begins to fatigue leading to either shin splints or what you experienced. If the hip externally rotates on heel strike and the weight is along the outside of the foot (eversion) then the peronius brevis (PB) has to work harder to stabilize and keep the foot from rolling inward. Your body has learned to compensate after the initial 6 month issue but now is under tension waiting for any minor change in heel strike to tweak the PB.
    Tha majority of my clients go through a series of exercise progressions to insure proper hip mechanics and then an overall body sequence to address any other discrepancies. Most chronic leg injuries or shoulder/arm injuries usually can be traced back to a biomechanical discrepancy of the hip or shoulder.

    Hope this helps.

    Orlando Gomez FF, PT, PFT

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    portland, OR
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    Wink Forgot

    Here is our website

    wwwadapttraining.com

    we do individualized training via e-mail where we eval via pics/video and develope a routine sequence for you. This isn't a hard sell, just look at the site for the philosophy and let me know if you have any questions.

  4. #4
    FLA1786
    Firehouse.com Guest

    Default

    Does the hip/back present without any pain or complication?

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Cool hip/back

    Yes, someone can have a muscular imbalance that can create decrease range of motion and/or a postural imbalance without back or hip pain. The body adapts to this. My example is when you hurt an ankle or knee and your brain says walk it doesn't care how you do it. You may look like Quasimodo but you will get across the room. If the gait deviation goes on long enough, it becomes a dominant motor pattern. It is like a car that is out of alignment at that point. At low speeds (demand) no problem but at high speeds ( high demand) the car (body) begins to shake and is damaged over time. As far as our bodies , the demand can be a new activity, increase in weights or distance or intensity with running. The problem is that the medical community in many cases will chase/treat symptoms but never look at the whole picture and treat the root cause. Back to the analogy: they change the worn tires but don't realign the car.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
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    Cool hip/back cont

    Sorry, had a screaming 2 y/o

    So to answer your ?. Yes you can have hip or back issues that don't manifest with pain now but due to the compensations can put your back at risk, waiting for the straw to break the camels back.

  7. #7
    MembersZone Subscriber
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    Jul 2005
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    Pleasanton, CA
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    Default

    Answers...
    Sounds like Ogomez stepped in here with soem very good answers .
    Sorry I wasn't here to help...

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