1. #1
    Forum Member

    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Missouri
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    1

    Post Nut seeking to make a difference

    Hello to all,

    I have come seeking advice, input, and real-world thoughts from those of you in the field.

    As an independent (hillbilly inventor -- more like tink-er-er, I am attempting to identify a multifaceted approach in developing an external insertion system for high-rise buildings. Until now, I've remained in the background following the progress of other systems and regulatory boards such as the ASTM, NIST, ect.

    After 4 years of research and prototype development, I’ve recently completed and tested my first full-scale cable-less platform system capable of moving 1500 pounds. Although my system (like others) has proven on a limited scale the insertion and rescue capabilities, I understand that these larger systems may not be feasible or accepted into practice. Early prototypes of my system weigh less than 60 pounds and have the ability of moving assets such as command and assessment tools-- so don't rule it out at first glance

    Don’t get too deep now, I’m not only a newbie to all of this-- I’m simple, independent, and under-edumacated, just attempting to step out in faith and maybe make a difference. If all else fails-- I’ll build buildings or radio towers with it

    I’ve posted a video of our recent test… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCb6jxqryxU
    NSERTNUT

  2. #2
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    Apr 2007
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    DFW Metroplex, TEXAS
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    Default A few questions / comments

    Jim,

    First, let me thank you for your efforts thus far. If only builders would put more thought into things like this...but then you would be a bored hill-billy
    just kiddin.

    Anyway, I watched your video and I have a few questions/comments.

    Questions
    Your plan is to attach this to the outside of a building?
    Would the platform be stored at each building or would
    this be something that the FD would bring with them?
    What is your power source? Sounds like a gas engine?
    How sound is the breaking system?
    What safety measures are in place?

    Comments
    Most everything we do in the fire service when it comes to heights has a "safety" associated with it. For instance, when we perform rope rescue, the rescuer and patient both have a main line and a "safety" line...in case the main line fails.
    Does your product have a "safety line?"

    Again, I applaud your efforts...keep up the good work.

  3. #3
    Forum Member

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    May 2007
    Location
    Missouri
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    Post New system

    Hello Sir, and Thank you,

    Normally designed to operate on the building’s exterior, it can be designed to operate inside of a building as well. All that’s required is a rail for operation.

    The technology’s versatility means that multiple systems can be designed to cover various needs. Although the system can be designed in-to buildings, we are developing systems to be brought to the scene and under the control of responders.

    The system shown in the video does use a gasoline-powered engine to move the platform and is totally self-contained. The system can also use an electric motor. The prototype tested is a five-man vehicle for inserting firefighters, but it could be built for as many as 20 people that would be used for extracting people from a building.

    Breaking is extremely sound and multiple safety measures are being designed into the system. Although I’m not able to go into detail at this time, safety lines are not needed, as the invention creates its own safety line so-to speak.

    I am currently working with others in the field to publish more detail on the invention and its uses. My reason for posting is to gather input (language) as to the various uses of such a device from those of you in the field. The Company plans to conduct a public test in southwest Missouri later this year. Following is an edited version of a news release that provides additional info…

    In addition to the company’s concept for moving men and equipment, the company is developing both lightweight and portable systems weighing less than 100 pounds capable of moving next generation assessment tools, such as “see-thru the wall” technologies. This unique ability provides unprecedented opportunities for emergency response capabilities and procedures while greatly reducing the risk to responders.

    Speed of ascent for the systems will be limited only by size of internal and independent power supplies as designed for each system. Although not fully developed, initial tests confirm the VTS system capable of moving first-responders into positions of 10-100 stories within the first 5 minutes of arriving on scene. This unique and Patent Pending drive system will create an entirely new paradigm for the movement of responders, evacuees, assessment tools, and response equipment.

    Our current prototype underwent successful manned testing in December of 2006. Later, in April of 2007, the Anderson, Missouri Fire Department tested the TRV under the direction of the Anderson Fire Chief, Mr. Shelby Turner. “I think it will be an important asset to fire services, especially in metropolitan areas,” said Turner. “The simplicity is what makes it so practical. It is easy to maintain and operate. It will definitely be a lifesaving device.”

    Once again, Thank you-- and any and all applause goes out to those of you who daily risk your lives, for us.
    NSERTNUT

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