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  1. #21
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    Default Another Big Fire Starts-Mt. Nebo area

    Wildfire Burning Near Scenic Nebo Loop
    July 19th, 2007 @ 6:30pm
    If you have photos of this wildfire you wish to submit, please send them to photos@ksl.com

    PHOTOS: Utah Wildfires 2007

    Sam Penrod Reporting

    Fire managers today put all available resources on alert, when they raised the nation's fire preparedness to its highest level.

    A new fire near Nephi closed State Road 132 between Mount Nebo and Fountain Green.

    It's a raging inferno, and this fire keeps growing more and more by the minute. It started around 2 p.m., and we're hearing it started from some sparks from someone's brake pads in Nephi Canyon, right near the Nebo Loop turnoff.

    The fire spread quickly to both sides of State Road 132, and it's really taken off from there. They've shut the road down; people have been evacuated out of the private camping areas, as well as about five houses there in the bottom of the canyon.



    Fire crews are there trying to protect the homes the best they can. There are RV trailers down there; some people were able to get their trailers out, and others did not. We don't know what happened to those that were left behind. Motorists driving through the canyon told me they turned around after they saw what happened 10 days ago in the Milford Flat fire. David Tatton, resident of Nephi, says, "[It's] amazing how much heat's in there. You don't realize that until you actually ride in the middle, and it's hot." Sgt. Hoby Metz, Utah Highway Patrol, says, "This canyon, there's a lot of swirling winds, the fire's been going all directions."

    The Juab County Sheriff's Office has been evacuating the homes. We were actually down there for just a few minutes just before 5 p.m. I will tell you it was intense, as people were trying to evacuate; they seemed to be in panic mode because this fire is spreading so fast.


    There are at least 25 to 30 cabins located just north of Fountain Green that I would say are in big trouble. It's known as the Holiday Oaks Development, and the fire's moving toward them. An air tanker is making retardant drops, and firefighters are trying to build some sort of a fire line, but it's very thick brush, and the fire is jumping the line.

    There are also two major power lines that go here, there's another major power line on the other side of the canyon. Some of the power lines are metal poles, and the others are those old wooden poles; they're clearly in trouble. In fact, we understand the power is already out in many locations in Central Utah.

    State Road 132 is closed. Alternates to get into the Sanpete Valley are State Road 28 to Gunnison or through Spanish Fork Canyon and take highway 89 to get around.

    We'll continue to follow this fast-moving fire, which is clearly another major threat to the Central Utah area.
    Last edited by UTFFEMT; 12-02-2007 at 09:02 PM.
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  2. #22
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    Default Wildfires Evrywhere now in Utah

    Wildfires erupt across Utah

    Thousands evacuated; buildings are destroyed

    By Ben Winslow
    Deseret Morning News
    A series of wildfires across Utah burned buildings and prompted evacuations as winds fanned flames through extremely dry brush and grasses.
    Steve Landeen, KSL-TVThe Salt Creek fire burns Thursday on dry forest land between the Nebo Loop and Fountain Green. So far, the wildfire has consumed more than 13,000 acres. A tiny spark exploded into a wildfire that has burned more than 13,000 acres in central Utah, leading to the evacuations of campgrounds, trailheads and cabins along the 32-mile Nebo Loop.
    The Salt Creek fire has been declared a national priority, and a Type I team has been assigned to manage firefighting efforts.
    But there are problems.
    "The nearest available Type I team is in the southeast United States," said Loyal Clark with the Uinta National Forest. "All the Type I teams in the western United States are already committed to fires."
    The fire started at a KOA campground in Salt Creek Canyon, about six miles east of Nephi. The campground, a nearby motel and several vehicles were destroyed, firefighters said.
    "I just saw this huge wall of smoke," said Pat Johnson, who lives in Fountain Green.
    Sheriff's deputies and fire crews worked quickly to evacuate more than 2,000 people from the area, including a pair of Scout camps. As many as 18 Boy Scouts and two hikers had to be flown out in helicopters.
    "If they'd had to hike out, they'd have gotten trapped," said Bert Hart with the Richfield Interagency Fire Center.
    Several subdivisions of homes were also evacuated.
    "We had gone through there and told people to take what they can and leave," Sanpete County Sheriff Kevin Holman said Thursday night.
    Trailers parked in camping areas along the Nebo Loop road were left, their owners not allowed to recover them because of safety concerns.
    A sheriff's deputy was hit by a car in the confusion to get out and suffered minor injuries, authorities said. A volunteer firefighter also suffered a twisted knee while battling the blaze.



    Portions of state Route 132 and the Nebo Loop remain closed today, the Utah Highway Patrol said.
    The fire is human-caused. Authorities are investigating reports that a vehicle's brake pads created sparking. The wildfire also burned a 138,000-volt transmission line, knocking out power for much of Sanpete County for several hours.
    Paradise 'lost'
    About 25 people were evacuated from the Hamlin Valley as a wildfire whipped up Thursday afternoon near the Utah-Nevada border.
    "We've already lost an undetermined amount of structures," Color Country Fire Management's LaCee Bartholomew told the Deseret Morning News late Thursday.
    Air tankers, water tender trucks, fire engines and fire crews were dispatched to create lines as the Paradise Fire grew. Iron County sheriff's deputies and volunteer search and rescue teams manned roadblocks and helped people get to safety.
    "There's a lot of fuel out there," Iron County sheriff's deputy Jody Edwards said of the fire area. "It's going to be scary."
    Fire officials estimate the fire has burned nearly 4,000-acres of extremely dry sagebrush, grass, pinyon and juniper.

    Dakota Hills fire
    In Kane County, summer cabins near Navajo Lake were evacuated as one fire moved out of Zion National Park and toward the North Fork Road. A 30-mile stretch of rural road was affected from Ponderosa to Navajo Lake, including the Sky Haven subdivision, Kane County sheriff's dispatchers said Thursday night.
    The sheriff's office would not say how many evacuees were affected or what was being done with them.
    The 7,300-plus acre Dakota Hills Complex is three separate fires burning in ponderosa pine, grass and brush inside and outside of the park. The area where the fires are burning is so inaccessible, fire crews are being flown in by helicopter.


    Deseret Morning News Graphic A new wildfire cropped up in Zion National Park on Thursday, burning on a mesa top.
    Collectively, the fires have prompted a closure of the park's entire backcountry, a number of trails and a campground. Hundreds of firefighters are being scrambled to the Dakota Hills Complex as a Type II management team begins managing the firefighting effort today. That means additional resources will be thrown at the fire.
    Statewide fires
    More wildfires are sparking up across the state as firefighting resources get stretched even thinner.
    "We're just hoping that the winds and the weather treat us right on these fires," said Erin Darboven with the Bureau of Land Management.
    Those fires include:


    The Monarch fire, which has burned more than 17,000 acres of sagebrush, grass and juniper in the Lakeside Mountains of Tooele County. The fire was sparked by lightning on Wednesday and is 50 percent contained.

    The Kimball fire, burning in the Stansbury Mountains, about 15 miles west of Grantsville. The fire has burned more than 450 acres and is only 10 percent contained. A home, several outbuildings and a communications tower are threatened.

    The Radio fire, burning 15 miles southwest of St. George, has burned more than 7,000 acres of sagebrush and grass. It is threatening some communications equipment, the BLM said. It was sparked by lightning on Wednesday.

    The Sullivan-Clark fire is burning 150 acres about 35 miles south of St. George. Storms that passed through earlier this week ignited the fire.

    The lightning-caused Road Canyon fire has burned an estimated 100 acres 30 miles south of St. George.

    The Neola North fire has burned more than 43,000 acres in eastern Utah but is only 89 percent contained. The cause of the fire remains under investigation.

    Steve Landeen, KSL-TVDamage was extensive at a KOA campground during the Salt Creek fire. A nearby motel and vehicles were also destroyed. National priority
    With wildfires burning all over the west and resources stretched thin, the National Interagency Fire Center moved to a preparedness level 5, its highest level. That allows officials to request more firefighters from all over, including outside the United States.
    A Type I team usually gets the most firefighting resources right away, but Clark said it may be difficult to get them for the Salt Creek fire.
    "All of the resources, all of the air support, they're all committed to fires throughout the western United States," she said.
    Meanwhile, conditions for wildfires continue to worsen. A red flag warning has been issued for much of Utah until 10 tonight. It means winds are strong, humidity is low and conditions are ripe for more wildfires. Thunderstorms are forecast to move across the Uinta mountains and central Utah this afternoon, said Brandon Smith, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Salt Lake City.
    "Unfortunately, the fuels are so dry that even single lightning strikes can cause a fire," he said.
    Last edited by UTFFEMT; 12-02-2007 at 09:02 PM.
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  3. #23
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    Default Fire Updates

    Fires continue to burn in Utah The Associated Press
    SALT LAKE CITY -- High temperatures and low humidity helped large wildfires grow throughout Utah on Saturday.

    Temperatures were expected to be nearing 100 degrees in many parts of the state while humidity was forecast to be about 10 percent in many of the areas where the state's 10 wildfires were burning.

    Fire crews battling a blaze near Nephi, about 85 miles south of Salt Lake City, were still waiting for more crews members to arrive before they could begin working to extinguish the fire instead of just protecting homes, cabins and trailers in the Uinta National Forest.

    The fire had burned more than 14,000 acres by Saturday, or about 22 square miles.

    Officials revised an earlier estimate that placed the size of the fire at 18,000 acres, or about 28 square miles, once they viewed satellite images that showed the fire was smaller than they thought. The fire is estimated to be about 15 percent contained.

    Gov. Jon Huntsman toured the fire and said he would provide National Guard troops to help if fire officials requested them.

    Fire officials were keeping a close watch on several dozen homes near the small community of Indianola, about 10 miles east of the fire.

    On Friday, a private KOA campground in Salt Creek Canyon burned, although it was not a total loss. Several buildings, vehicles and trailers at the campground were burned, the U.S. Forest Service said.

    The cause of the fire, which started on Thursday, was still under investigation on Saturday.

    Another fire burning in the backcountry of Zion National Park in southwest Utah had burned more than 9,400 acres, or nearly 15 square miles. It was about 5 percent contained on Saturday.

    Evacuations were ordered and some structures were threatened, although numbers were not immediately available.
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  4. #24
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    Default Fire Updates again

    Weather danger soars: Lightning, high winds may aggravate wildfires

    By Rebecca Palmer
    Deseret Morning News
    NEPHI — As a national firefighting team from Florida took over suppression efforts Saturday evening, a double rainbow formed west of smoke lines spawned by the now-15,000-acre Salt Creek wildfire.
    Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning NewsFirefighters try to contain a front of flames burning near a ranch home between Fountain Green and Nephi as the Salt Creek fire burns in the Nebo Loop area.
    More photos
    But the rainbow and its hints of moisture also signal increased danger. Crews battling the blaze were warned Saturday that the weather in the next few days could make their task more difficult — and dangerous.
    Approaching thunderstorms and attendant winds of up to 50 mph could drive the flames torching the ridges, mountainsides and rangelands in an arc between Nephi, Fountain Green and Indianola, National Weather Service fire forecaster Mike Chatelain said. Trees in the area are drier than they have ever been. Conditions also may make it possible for flames to jump up to half a mile, potentially trapping firefighters, they were warned.
    Air over Utah is so dry that any rain will dry before it hits the ground, Richfield Interagency Fire spokesman Bert Hart said. But lightning will likely strike, and hot winds could spread the fire into residential areas.
    The forecast calls for a high of 95 today in Nephi and 100 in Salt Lake City. The threat of thunderstorms and high winds will increase into the first of the week, according to the National Weather Service.
    Meanwhile, Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. told Juab and Sanpete county residents Saturday that ranchers won't have to bear the brunt of the quick-spreading Salt Creek wildfire.
    The state of Utah will help to plant new fire-resistant plants on the burned land when the fire is safely out, the governor said during a visit to the fire's incident command center at Nephi's Nebo High School. The state's Agriculture Department will also deploy a Department of Public Safety helicopter to help round up scattered cattle and will ensure that those cattle have places to graze during the time it takes to regrow burned grasses. If necessary, Huntsman said, he will send National Guard troops to help if fire officials request them.



    "The ravages of Mother Nature are clearly on display," Huntsman said at a news conference. "I don't know that there's been a time in recent history that our resources have been stretched this thin."
    Meanwhile, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has agreed to pay up to 75 percent of state and local firefighting costs through a special wildfire grant, according to Bureau of Land Management officials on scene Saturday.
    While public officials prepared to cope with the long-term problems caused by the fire, a national firefighting team arrived from Florida, and local teams and volunteer workers fought the blaze on the front lines.
    Throughout most of Saturday the fire slowly spread north and eastward. Crews on the ground tore brush and worked with shovels and rakes to stem the flames' progress while helicopters and planes dumped red-orange retardant and many tons of water near the blaze.
    In Nephi, black, orange and white smoke could be seen mixing with cotton-candy-like white clouds. Many of the town's residents quietly worried about recreational and agricultural land burning in the area as they celebrated the pre-Pioneer Day weekend.
    Other residents forced to leave summer homes and trailers in the fire area tried to keep in constant contact with the sheriff's department for updates. One concerned couple who own a second home in a subdivision in the Salt Creek canyon visited the incident command post to donate water and to learn about their property. The couple had not seen their home for three weeks.
    Nancy Graham, who lives in West Jordan, said she and her neighbors have tried to prepare themselves for the possibility of fire by maintaining the brush near the property and ensuring that local firefighters knew how to access the properties. She said despite the trouble, she loves her mountain home.
    Jennifer Ackerman, Deseret Morning NewsCrews watch the Salt Creek fire from state Route 132 outside Nephi after it jumped the canyon and began shifting back toward Nephi Saturday.
    More photos
    "It's a beautiful area, a great retirement," she explained. "If you've ever been up there you know why people love it."
    Late Saturday afternoon, the fire ravaged about half an acre of some of the beautiful mountain property.
    The rolling orange flames were as tall as surrounding power poles, and nearby firetrucks and tankers looked like toys compared to the massive blaze.
    The tallest trees in the fire's path caused the flames to spike. When the trees' needles burned, black, oily smoke curled in with white towers of smoke. In time, the smoke took over half the sky.
    Just a few hundred yards below the fire's far northeastern flank, a ranch house sat vacant. In a nearby field, six white, black and pimento horses trotted about, seemingly unaware of the danger they were in.
    By late Saturday, officials believed the fire was headed away from the ranch.
    The fire, which burned sporadically, also threatened the subdivisions of Oaker Hills, Indian Ridge and Elk Ridge near the canyon's Mount Baldy. The communities were forcibly evacuated by law enforcement Friday night. They had been on alert since the fire started near Nephi on Thursday.
    Area residents with health problems such as asthma were also warned that they may be in danger due to the smoke, said Sanpete County Sheriff's Sgt. Greg Peterson.
    BLM spokesman Terry Krasko also said Saturday that earlier reports that as many as 18 Boy Scouts had been evacuated by helicopter are not correct. He said no Scouts had been evacuated.
    On its northeastern flank the fire is about four miles from the town of Indianola which, along with nearby Fountain Green, remained under alert Saturday night. If the fire moves over Mount Baldy, the towns will be evacuated, national commanders told their crews during a briefing Saturday morning.
    Scott G. Winterton, Deseret Morning NewsA helicopter drops water on flames burning near a home in the Nebo Loop area. The Salt Creek fire has burned 15,000 acres.
    More photos
    Meanwhile, wildfires burning elsewhere in Utah advanced significantly after being fanned by high winds.
    "It was hot for firefighters today," said BLM spokeswoman Erin Darboven.
    The Kimbell and Monarch fires, burning in Tooele County, each grew by about 7,000 acres.
    The Dairy Valley fire, burning in western Box Elder County near Grouse Creek, grew from 800 to about 7,000 acres in heavy winds.
    "The Kimbell winds were so erratic," Darboven said, "they had to shut things down (firefighting efforts) for a minute."
    Firefighters were ordered to their safety zones to wait for conditions to improve, she said.
    Winds were so heavy at the Dairy Valley fire, Darboven said, that firefighters reported seeing fire whirls, which resemble tornados.
    Fire officials are contemplating the possibility of combining firefighting efforts on the Dairy Valley fire with a fire burning in nearby Nevada. That way, they could pool resources for the two fires, Darboven said.
    Wildfire developments

    • The uncontrolled Salt Creek fire near Nephi has now charred 15,000 acres.

    • Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. is promising aid to affected ranchers.

    • FEMA has agreed to pay up to 75 percent of state and local firefighting costs.

    • Crews have been warned that approaching thunderstorms could hamper and endanger them.
    Last edited by UTFFEMT; 12-02-2007 at 09:02 PM.
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  5. #25
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    Default LonePeak Fire

    BRUSH FIRE THREATENS HOMES -- Four homes were evacuated in Highland on Monday afternoon after a brush fire crept dangerously close.

    Firefighters arrived at the scene in the heavily wooded Bull River area to find flames shooting nearly 60 feet into the air, said Joe McRay of the Lone Peak Fire District. The blaze only burned about five acres, McRay said, but was widely spread. Firefighters from Lehi and American Fork provided mutual assistance.

    McRay said it took firefighters about 30 minutes to get the fire under control and about three hours to extinguish it. Firefighters were able to keep flames from damaging the homes, saving about $5 million in personal property, McRay said. "The potential was huge," he said.

    The fire began near Tamarack Drive. The cause is under investigation
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  6. #26
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    Default 2 Utah County Fire Brak out

    Two brush fires break out in county Daily Herald
    Two small brush fires kept firefighters busy Monday. One started at approximately 3:30 p.m. four miles up Spanish Fork Canyon about 1/2 mile east of the Covered Bridge turnoff.

    The fire burned seven acres and threatened some holding pens for cattle. Firefighters from Spanish Fork, the U.S. Forest Service, Utah County Fire Department, Springville and Mapleton contained the blaze within about an hour but crews stayed into the night securing the area.

    A second fire on Powerhouse Road in Spanish Fork a mile and a half west of U.S. Highway 6 grew to 12 acres in size after starting at about 4:15 p.m. That fire threatened a satellite receiver for a time but crews from Spanish Fork, Mapleton, Salem, Payson and the U.S. Forest Service were able to contain it within about an hour and a half. A Bureau of Land Management helicopter responded to the fire on Powerhouse Road but was not needed by the time it arrived.

    The causes of both fires were unknown by press time.
    Last edited by UTFFEMT; 01-29-2009 at 06:39 PM.
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  7. #27
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    Default Fire Near Strawberry Reservoir

    Fire Near Strawberry Reservoir Burns 95 Acres
    August 14th, 2007 @ 7:42am
    (KSL News) Fire crews will be back on the lines of a fire burning near Strawberry Reservoir this morning.

    The fire was contained last night, but there are still spots burning within the fire line that crews have yet to put out.

    So far 95 acres have burned.
    Last edited by UTFFEMT; 01-29-2009 at 06:39 PM.
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  8. #28
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    Default Another Fire in Millard County

    Terrain Poses Problems in Fighting Wildfire
    August 24th, 2007 @ 7:31am
    (KSL News) A wildfire in central Utah could be burning until mid-September.

    Lightning started the Lowry fire, which is burning in Millard County just east of Scipio. The fire already has burned 1,900 acres.

    Officials tell the Deseret Morning News terrain is a major problem, and it's not even safe to send crews in to fight the flames.
    Last edited by UTFFEMT; 01-29-2009 at 06:40 PM.
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  9. #29
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    Default Orem Brush Fire Threatens Homes

    Fire snuffed before reaching Orem homes


    Several Orem residents breathed a sigh of relief Monday evening after firefighters were able to contain a brush fire before it reached their homes.

    Though the massive, record-setting blazes that characterized Utah's summer have mostly subsided, Provo and Orem got a reminder that the fire season isn't over yet. A brush fire broke out around 4 p.m. in a small ravine along the old Carterville Road walking path where 4800 North in Provo turns into Orem Center Street.

    Fueled by thick, dry vegetation, the flames crept up the west side of the ravine toward an Orem neighborhood, but firefighters were able to keep it from spreading. During a summer when fire damage has often been measured in thousands of acres, Monday's fire burned about 100 square yards at most, according to Battalion Chief Kevin Kemp of the Orem Fire Department.

    "It could've been a big deal but I think we made a pretty good stop on it and protected those structures," Kemp said. "This stuff's dry. It's been a dry year. We're always concerned about that thick vegetation."

    With the flames nearly straddling the dividing line between Provo and Orem, firefighters from both cities helped fight the blaze. Kemp said six engine companies and about 30 firefighters took part in the effort.

    Vic Deauvono of the North Fork Fire Department, who was at the scene to observe in case his department's 2,000-gallon tanker was needed, said he suspected that the blaze was manmade. Deauvono, who lives in the area, said there have been three or four fires near there over the past few years caused by firecrackers and cigarettes, and said Monday's fire was likely due to similar causes.

    "It looks manmade to me," he said.

    Joan Lloyd remembers one of those fires. Lloyd's house on 50 South in Orem sits alongside the edge of the ravine. Five years ago another blaze erupted in the same spot, she said, but crept close enough to burn part of her neighbor's roof. During that fire, Lloyd said she sprayed flames with a hose and ended up with singed clothes and burnt lawn furniture.

    Kevin Lloyd, Joan Lloyd's son, said they were fortunate that the flames did not spread as far this time.

    "I could see smoke going everywhere," he said. "It's a good thing (the firefighters) got here early enough."
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