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  1. #1
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    Default 100' sections of 3"

    Anybody here use or have expirence with 100' sections of 3" supply hose. We have found a company that couples it in 100' lengths and is good bit cheaper than 50' sections


  2. #2
    Forum Member len1582's Avatar
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    Why would you not want 4" or 5" ?

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    MembersZone Subscriber Fletch 8903's Avatar
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    One downside I see would be if you intend to roll it on the scene to take back to the station to clean, dry then reload. A 100' roll is going to be a little unwieldy when it's rolled up and wet.

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    We are still in the dark ages using 3" for all our supply hose

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    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Nitrile rubber or double jacket? If it is double jacket forget it. It is too damn heavt when it is wet to roll and carry, let alone dry. If it is rubber and you will be reloading it instead of rolling it, then my answer is yes do it. Out 3 inch hose is all nitrile rubber in 100 foot sections and it works out just fine. And yes it is cheaper that way.

    FyredUp

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    MembersZone Subscriber Fire1839's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firersq615 View Post
    We are still in the dark ages using 3" for all our supply hose
    I wouldn't go that far....If your coverage area is anything at all like my stations...We have 4 engines with beds full of 3 inch and only 1 engine w/ 5 inch which is a new engine bought about 2 years ago..4 of the engines have 1000 gal tanks...Our coverage area is basically all 1 story ranch housing...our saying around the firehouse is if you can't knock down the fire in a 1 story ranch with 1000 gallons its not really gonna matter if you have a 3 inch or 5 inch supply...however 3 out of the five engines are being replace and will be purchased w/ 5 inch house...but i believe 3 inch is not obsolete in the least bit....

  7. #7
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    A 100' section of 3" works great as ladder pipe hose; no couplings to get caught-up when extending the aerial.

  8. #8
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    We have 100' sections of 4 inch hose. It is the rubber variety with storz fittings. I always have trouble figuring out which one is the male and which is the female end... It is very easy to work with and handle.

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    We use nitril rubber jacketed 3" for our preconnected Blitz fire lines. 400' preconnected. Our engines carry 1700' of 5" supply.

  10. #10
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R1SAlum View Post
    A 100' section of 3" works great as ladder pipe hose; no couplings to get caught-up when extending the aerial.

    Thanks, Bro. That's where I was going as well. '615 - Ladder pipe line is the Only use for 100 ft. sections in hose that is over 1.5 inch, until you get to LDH. We don't use LDH at all (only a few of our almost 90 Engines in this County carry it, One station (25) has all 5 inch and operates as the Water Supply Company) Some stations use Forestry Hose in 1 and/or 1.5 dia that is coupled in 100 ft lengths, as does the State Forestry units. If I were going to get a 100 ft section for a Ladder Pipe, I think I'd use Single Jacket Dacron in 3.5 dia to ensure adequate water at an increased elevation.
    Last edited by hwoods; 06-12-2007 at 10:40 PM.
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    MembersZone Subscriber dday05's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by firersq615 View Post
    We are still in the dark ages using 3" for all our supply hose
    Sorry to hear that. Can you talk anyone into getting some LDH hose? Maybe a good training session on it could change some minds.

  12. #12
    55 Years & Still Rolling hwoods's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dday05 View Post
    Sorry to hear that. Can you talk anyone into getting some LDH hose? Maybe a good training session on it could change some minds.
    We tried it, didn't like it, went back to 3" for supply line.
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  13. #13
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    I like the 100' sections. I've used both 50' and 100'. We've had two issues. The first was that the 100' sections can be a bear to work with, particularly the woven jacket stuff. This was addressed by switching to the Angus Hose. I know people complain about it, but it's indestructible and can be reloaded without drying.

    The other issue becomes apparent when drivers are used to spotting the truck for 50' sections, and then they have 50' extra hose lying around in a pile between the truck and the hydrant. The have to become more creative with their "esses"

  14. #14
    MembersZone Subscriber dday05's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwoods View Post
    We tried it, didn't like it, went back to 3" for supply line.
    Atleast you tried it. If your happy then I'm happy. Goes back to some stuff works better for some depts and some things don't.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geinandputitout View Post
    I like the 100' sections. I've used both 50' and 100'. We've had two issues. The first was that the 100' sections can be a bear to work with, particularly the woven jacket stuff. This was addressed by switching to the Angus Hose. I know people complain about it, but it's indestructible and can be reloaded without drying.

    The other issue becomes apparent when drivers are used to spotting the truck for 50' sections, and then they have 50' extra hose lying around in a pile between the truck and the hydrant. The have to become more creative with their "esses"
    We actually have 950 feet on all of our trucks. The last link is 50 feet long, all others are 100 foot. That way we can hook truck to truck with 50 foot lengths or longer if need be. Works really well for us.

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    There is nothing wrong with 3" supply line. In fact some of our rigs only carry 3". This is not a dark ages technique. It's called using your head! Why drop 500 ft of 5" for a room and contents when you can easily get it done with tank water and maybe 500 ft of 3". Faster pick up!

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    We use 5" supply line, but also have 800' of 3" that we can use for a dual lay for extra water along with the 5". Our main use of the 3" though is for stretching it to a gated wye and then taking (2) 2" lines off the wye for apartment fires. We load 700' of the 3" as 100' sticks and the last 100' is 50' sticks.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by firersq615 View Post
    Anybody here use or have expirence with 100' sections of 3" supply hose. We have found a company that couples it in 100' lengths and is good bit cheaper than 50' sections
    what ever rocks their boat

  19. #19
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ehs7554 View Post
    There is nothing wrong with 3" supply line. In fact some of our rigs only carry 3". This is not a dark ages technique. It's called using your head! Why drop 500 ft of 5" for a room and contents when you can easily get it done with tank water and maybe 500 ft of 3". Faster pick up!
    Look if yiou like laying a single 3 inch 500 feet that's great. But you are limiting the amount of water you will get. Both FD's I am on lay 5 inch for supply and it doesn't matter if it is a room and contents fire or an industrial fire we always lay for max flow capabilities. Suppose your single lay of 3 inch is overwhelmed because the fire was more than originally detected? Then what? Hand stretch for more water or wait for the next engine to lay in yet another single 3 inch?

    Sorry to sound harsh but it sounds to me like your biggest justification for laying the 3 inch over the 5 inch is it easier pick up. How much harder is the 5 inch to load? We turn the rig around and straddle the hose and drive over it with 3 guys loading, 2 in the bed and one on the ground.

    I guess like someone else said whatever rocks your boat.

    FyredUp

  20. #20
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    If we need more we usually have a second pumper on another plug. Just bring it in. My first dept only had 5" and my current job usues both. It was strange to me at first to see 3" line, but now it all makes sense. Yes it is an easier pick up, but really, a good plug even with one 3" line is almost always just as effective. A 3" lay provides enough water for 2 or 3 lines and with a bad plug gives you less of a chance of cavitation that you see with 5".

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