1. #1
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    Default Securing a patient in a Stokes

    Does anyone know a website where I can find training materials on securing a patient into a Stokes basket for high angle rescue.

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    Hello, I'm not sure of your training/rescue experience - There are a 100 different ways to lash a pt into a stokes. There are several companies that sell pre-rigged litter lashes. CMC Rescue sells one of the best I've seen and it is very quick and easy to use ($$$). The CMC rig has a full body lash that uses parachute clips to attach the webbing using small o-rings. The cheapest design would be to use 1" webbing to tie the pt into the stokes. To get some diagrams on packaging you could do a Google search and will come up with some intro info. Most of the systems I've seen use simple knots and hitches - overhands, half-hitches, and cloves. Good luck.

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    Yes, there are many was to tie a patinet into the litter. Most people agree that this should not be the only attachment of the patient into the system. Make sure that whatever you do to attach the patient into the litter, you are also providing a secure life-safety backup for the patient. i.e. harness.

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    I agree, securing a pt to the litter can be done several ways. One consideration is how you are bringing them out, vertical or horizontal.
    That will depend on your team's training and equipment, plus the topography of the rescue site. If the patient is horizontal remember to ALWAYS have an attendant. We have to monitor the patient and if they vomit or their breathing becomes labored they could die prior to getting them up / down.
    Webbing is what we use for lashing our patients in. Depending on injuries we tie a harness on them as well. Sometimes we use the webbing for a foot rest, sometimes it is part of a harness tied into the basket. Experiment and see what you like. The basic is just lashing the victim in like tying your shoes. I havent even got a consensus on top first or bottom first.
    So I would recommend trying a few things with rugged ron then when you come up with something you like try a rescuer as victim to evaluate comfort and such.
    With rugged ron try some worst case failure scenarios and see if you think think the patient would do OK how you lased him in.

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    Default Basket Setup?

    Im not sure what basket you use. But theres a basket made in Ontario Canada.
    (International Rescue Basket and Stretcher)
    This Basket elements Patient set up as it comes with a great Patient System made of a Velcro Section then a Buckle system.
    Many Departments in the U.S as well as Canada use this Basket.

    Great Basket Great Price.
    Just do a Web search for International Basket Systems youll find it.

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    We use a 40' piece of 1" webbing. Start at the feet and secure the middle of the webbing to the bottom of the stokes (near the toes). criss cross the webbing back and forth across the basket using half hitches. And, as everyone else stated, be sure to secure the patient with a harness as well. We use a bear claw and secure all 4 corners of the stokes, as well as the pt's harness to it. Works good, nice and neat...

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    Question Pt Harness?

    I'm never one to state that some ones training or Tatical methods are wrong. But placeing a pt in a harness,is one tactic i can never agree on. If you put a pt in a basket were assuming he/ she has some serious injuries or thats just a mode of transport. If injuries are present are we going to make it worse by putting them in a harness.
    Then were going to tie a line to the pt???
    Why?? Is it so if the system or main rope break/fails.
    If thats the reason, then correct me if Im wrong this poor Pt now has a the weight of the basket and maybe a rescuer all riding around this Pt's waist ( Thats crazy Thinking). The patient is tied into the basket with all this force on his waist.

    You have a basket Vertical or even a Horizontal Haul/Lower doesnt matter. It has 2 ropes tied into it. So then we are we attaching a rope to our Pt. If thats whats being stated can someone I dont care who. Please clarify this for me.
    And are booth ropes going to fail?? Hell maybe the whole system fails. Which I doubt. Im confused.

    I might not know any better but please can someone state the reason for this??

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    Lightbulb International Rescue Basket

    This basket takes away the Pt packaging problem

    The International Stretcher Systems Yellow Jacket Basket Litter offers a rugged lightweight aluminum frame, protective outer shell,suspended internal bed, four adjustable lifting slings and many other features. The unit has a low center of gravity because the bed is secured to the lower part of the frame. This provides greater security and protection for the patient. The bed itself is attached to the frame by buckles and heavy duty springs providing a fully suspended bed. Shocks are largely absorbed due to the suspension and principle of design, allowing transmission of impact to the patient to be minimized.


    The Yellow Jacket Basket Litter is load tested to U.S. Military specifications. It supports over 2,500 pounds (or 1,120 kgs.). We also further tested the basket to destruction, which was 9,750 pounds (almost 5 tones!).

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    Jafa
    The patient is placed in a harness during a vertical lift, not low angle.
    - The patient is secured to a backboard.
    - A harness is secured to the patient. We don't use an actual harness, we use 2 webbing loops to make a seat and chest harness. The webbing is passed under the back of the neck and under the knee's, so there is no movement of the patient (I.E. c-spine)
    - The patient/board are then secured to the stokes basket.
    - A bear claw (multiple attachment plate) is attached to the end of the main line
    - The stokes is rigged to the bearclaw via 4 points.
    - The patients harness is rigged to the bearclaw
    - The rescuers harness is rigged to the bear claw.
    Some teams use a seperate mainline for the victim and rescuer. Downside, two haul systems to set up, and both lines have to be pulled at the same pace.
    - The belay line is run to the bear claw, and then to the rescuer (same rope, use a knot to tie into the bear claw)

    Now, to actually answer your question. The harness on the stokes won't change much if the mainline fails. It is designed as a safety in case the basket, or the 4-point holding the basket fails. Or, if someone doesn't do a great job securing the patient into the stokes.

    I'm sure other's do it differently, but this works for us. And before 10 people point it out, yes, there is no back-up for the patient if the bearclaw fails, but you have to draw the line on back-up systems somewhere......

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    I agree with JAFA62 on this one. I tie a harness on patient in a stokes for one reason...If I need to move the basket from a horizontal position to a vertical position.

    Many agnecies will tie the safety directly to the backet and I don't see anything wrong with this practice.

    Without getting into the whole knot debate, if you use long tail interlocking bowlines the victim would only support his/her own weight in the event of a failure.

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    I apply a harness to the patient in the basket as a method to keep them from moving north or south if the basket has to be moved from horizontal. Not all patients in a bsket are backboarded.

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