Thread: Nerves

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    Default Nerves

    Ok, here in the rural, small county fire service, we average 1 call a week, but that can be to any one of the 12 stations. Ive been on my share of fires, lifeflights, mvas, and trainings but i still get real jittery every time a tone goes out. Ive been with the fire service for a while now and my question is: Is there a "technique" that you do to calm your nerves on your way to a call, or do you suffer from the same problem?


    thanks
    Jonathan

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrscvfs View Post
    Ok, here in the rural, small county fire service, we average 1 call a week, but that can be to any one of the 12 stations. Ive been on my share of fires, lifeflights, mvas, and trainings but i still get real jittery every time a tone goes out. Ive been with the fire service for a while now and my question is: Is there a "technique" that you do to calm your nerves on your way to a call, or do you suffer from the same problem?


    thanks
    Jonathan
    I go through the same thing as you do i just try to take deep breaths that is after i get all of my ppe on. It works for me.

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    Like he said.....Take a couple of deep breaths. It will give your mind a chance to settle down.

    If this does not help, I would check with your doctor to see if you have any underlying problems that are causing this. Take care and stay safe!!
    Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

    Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

    ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

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    Even after many years with the fire service I still become jittery at times. It's a perfectly normal reaction to the increase of adrenaline that your body experiences in response to the sudden stress of an emergency call.

    Stay focused on the call and stay focused on your goal to save people. When it's time, all of your training will kick in and you'll know exactly what to do.
    Last edited by RedFox0457; 07-12-2007 at 12:55 PM.

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    Take some deep breaths and put on some music REAL LOUD!
    If someone with multiple personalities threatens to kill himself, is it considered a hostage situation?

    Ryan

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    I don't know if what I get is nerves exactly... I think of it more as adrenaline. My heart starts racing, and I can't wait to go. But sometimes my hands do get a little shaky when I hear a call for something like a working fire, or something serious.

    Other than that, the adrenaline is just pumping for me.

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    yeah, its not like im getting scared, its more or less just adrenaline. Just curious how you control it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrscvfs View Post
    yeah, its not like im getting scared, its more or less just adrenaline. Just curious how you control it!
    You can't control it man.

    PS: there is nothing wrong with being scared. When I'm inside of a burning building, I get scared. When I pull up on a MVA where a young kid has just died (my kids are 8 and 11) I get scared. Everyone gets scared. What matters is how we react to that fear.

    It'll get easier with time, just stay with it.

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    wHEN I AM ON THR WAY TO A DECENT CALL I SIT BACK CLOSE MY EYES AND LISTEN TO MY MP3 PLAYER AND I DO THE SAME ON THE WAY BACK TO SORT OF "COOL DOWN" AND IT HAS BEEN WORKING FOR ME

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    Everyone's different, and everyone's responses to stressful stimuli are likewise different. I know of guys and gals who've been on years longer than me, who still get all jittery like they're on an uber-caffiene-rush when the tones drop for a serious TA or what sounds like a "good worker" (whether wildland or structural).

    I don't get jittery or nervous at all...but for years before I even started in public safety (with the police academy, 9 yrs ago), I did martial arts and practiced Eastern meditational techniques (all through HS and into college) on a daily basis. That helps a lot.

    I think part of the issue is that most Westerners "attach" to the outcome of their actions. In other words, for example, you go to a medical aid, and you expect that you're going to help and have a positive outcome in that patient's case. When that doesn't happen, you feel devastated, crushed, and defeated, and may engage in self-harming attitudes and behaviors such as self-blame, guilt, and alcohol or drug abuse.

    Eastern principle teaches that by not "attaching" to, or expecting a specific outcome, the mind focuses more clearly on what it is you're doing because there is no clouding thought like "Oh god, what if I screw up this tube attempt..." and you are more likely to succeed in the application of your skills. This mindset allows you to realize that sometimes, despite your very best efforts, the patient dies, or the house burns down. It may seem callous, or uncaring, but the fact is that sometimes, no matter what you do or how well you do it, Fate, Spirit, God, whatever has other plans for the outcome.

    It's a completely foreign concept to most Americans, and difficult for one brought up in Western culture to learn... but it's one that's highly useful, especially in stressful or difficult situations such as those faced by Police, Fire, and EMS workers every day.
    My opinions might coincide with someone of importance's POV... I wouldn't know, since I never bothered to ask. My policy is: "Don't ask, don't care."

    IACOJ--West Coast PITA

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    Quote Originally Posted by the1141man View Post
    Everyone's different, and everyone's responses to stressful stimuli are likewise different. I know of guys and gals who've been on years longer than me, who still get all jittery like they're on an uber-caffiene-rush when the tones drop for a serious TA or what sounds like a "good worker" (whether wildland or structural).

    I don't get jittery or nervous at all...but for years before I even started in public safety (with the police academy, 9 yrs ago), I did martial arts and practiced Eastern meditational techniques (all through HS and into college) on a daily basis. That helps a lot.

    I think part of the issue is that most Westerners "attach" to the outcome of their actions. In other words, for example, you go to a medical aid, and you expect that you're going to help and have a positive outcome in that patient's case. When that doesn't happen, you feel devastated, crushed, and defeated, and may engage in self-harming attitudes and behaviors such as self-blame, guilt, and alcohol or drug abuse.

    Eastern principle teaches that by not "attaching" to, or expecting a specific outcome, the mind focuses more clearly on what it is you're doing because there is no clouding thought like "Oh god, what if I screw up this tube attempt..." and you are more likely to succeed in the application of your skills. This mindset allows you to realize that sometimes, despite your very best efforts, the patient dies, or the house burns down. It may seem callous, or uncaring, but the fact is that sometimes, no matter what you do or how well you do it, Fate, Spirit, God, whatever has other plans for the outcome.

    It's a completely foreign concept to most Americans, and difficult for one brought up in Western culture to learn... but it's one that's highly useful, especially in stressful or difficult situations such as those faced by Police, Fire, and EMS workers every day.




    If you say so Yoda

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    Quote Originally Posted by malana1 View Post
    If you say so Yoda
    Funny.

    I almost forgot why it was I avoided this site for a few months, but genius comments like yours just now, and on the "Chief is getting on me" thread definitely helped remind me. Thanks!
    My opinions might coincide with someone of importance's POV... I wouldn't know, since I never bothered to ask. My policy is: "Don't ask, don't care."

    IACOJ--West Coast PITA

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    Well stated post 1411. I just wish I had the mental discipline to do that.

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    I'll admit that I can get a bit jittery at times.

    Was at church one time in my uniform when an usher came up to me and said that a lady was having chest pain. So I get him to call 911, I grab a bp cuff and steth from a back room at the church and go to check the lady out. She had taken one nitro but was still feeling a bit under the weather and as I was doing my assessment/getting vitals and such, I guess I was shaking pretty good. She asked me if it was me shaking or her. We all got a good laugh out of it. But seriously, try to take some deep breaths and look at the situation. Once you take a few deep breaths you will be abelt to think clearly and be aware of your surroundings.

    I've stopped at a few accidents in my POV and the first one I stopped at was one of the worst and it taught me a very good lesson. And that was to a) calm down and evaluate the situation and b) to remember that you are the most important person there, YOUR SAFETY IS PARAMOUNT TO EVERYONE.

    To put it all in a nutshell, came across the MVA, had someone call it in, go around the back of my car to gear up, when out of no where a guy comes and yanks a female out of one of the cars. I freaked out a little bit because she looked like we were gonna have to Life Flight her and she looked like she needed help NOW. So I said screw the gear, just grabbed my trauma kit and ran up there. All ended up well in the end and when the FD (neighboring to outs) got there I introduced myself, showed them what I had gotten done and asked if they needed my help. The chief told me that I was to be in charge of loading the female pt. and his crews would assist as needed.

    Now in retrospect, I would have geared up for numerous reasons....

    1) Flash Fire/Explosion
    2) Vehicle Fluids
    3) Bodily Fluids
    4) Glass/Debris on roadway
    5) Identification to responding units
    6) Visibility to other drivers





    At the latest accident I have stopped at, which was this past week, I didnt have my gear with me so I did the best I could to protect myself and take care of the pt. But on this latest one also, I could have done a better job of calming myself down. I know that I like the adrenaline rush but it can get you killed, just calm down, think about not only what you are doing, but what you will be doing, and you will be fine.


    ***For those readers who havent been on a call, etc***

    If you are worried about remembering all the little things you were taught in your First Aid, First Responder, or EMT class, don't worry, they all come back when you need them and you don't even really have to think. It all just is pretty automatic.
    ------------------------------------
    These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
    ------------------------------------

  15. #15
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    Let's just say were going in for drill i just look around as the truck drives on and talk to my friends about the drill and what we will be doing

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    Quote Originally Posted by the1141man View Post
    Everyone's different, and everyone's responses to stressful stimuli are likewise different. I know of guys and gals who've been on years longer than me, who still get all jittery like they're on an uber-caffiene-rush when the tones drop for a serious TA or what sounds like a "good worker" (whether wildland or structural).

    I don't get jittery or nervous at all...but for years before I even started in public safety (with the police academy, 9 yrs ago), I did martial arts and practiced Eastern meditational techniques (all through HS and into college) on a daily basis. That helps a lot.

    I think part of the issue is that most Westerners "attach" to the outcome of their actions. In other words, for example, you go to a medical aid, and you expect that you're going to help and have a positive outcome in that patient's case. When that doesn't happen, you feel devastated, crushed, and defeated, and may engage in self-harming attitudes and behaviors such as self-blame, guilt, and alcohol or drug abuse.

    Eastern principle teaches that by not "attaching" to, or expecting a specific outcome, the mind focuses more clearly on what it is you're doing because there is no clouding thought like "Oh god, what if I screw up this tube attempt..." and you are more likely to succeed in the application of your skills. This mindset allows you to realize that sometimes, despite your very best efforts, the patient dies, or the house burns down. It may seem callous, or uncaring, but the fact is that sometimes, no matter what you do or how well you do it, Fate, Spirit, God, whatever has other plans for the outcome.

    It's a completely foreign concept to most Americans, and difficult for one brought up in Western culture to learn... but it's one that's highly useful, especially in stressful or difficult situations such as those faced by Police, Fire, and EMS workers every day.
    Don't listen to that other dude. You're post is VERY VERY GOOD, and I appreciate you posting it. I've always been interested in Eastern cultures and their practices, speaking spiritually. Very interesting.. and SUCCESSFUL stuff.

    Some people just don't have the open-minds or maturity to discuss such things.

    Either way, good advice, that I will use.

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    one thing I would reccomend against, is listening to an mp3 player or something on the way to an incident. I may turn the radio on when I'm driving our departments utility truck on a detail or something, but always low, so I can hear tones if they go off. If our tones drop, the fm radio goes off, and I listen to dispatch only. You don't want to risk not hearing a vital piece of info dispatch relays. Nothing would look worse, than you showing up and being completely lost, because what you thought was a BS call, is a worker with persons trapped.

    Also, the1141man, great post indeed. Eastern cultures, do have a way with accepting what comes with life, part of that being death. It will happen to everyone, and as long as we did what we could, and tried to prevent it, we shouldn't feel bad. Not to say we shouldn't try. We can make a difference some of the time, but when we can't, as long as we did all we knew how to, there is nothing to feel sorry about. I find that this attitude becomes more pervasive, the longer someone has been in fire/ems. My dad has this take, and quite frankly, it's always made sense to me. At the same time, I've seen guys come in with no previous experience, no relatives or anyone in the fire service, and they seem to think they should be able to change the world as long as they want it enough. In the end though, the universe/God/Fate/whatever will win out.

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    Thumbs up Brothers and Sisters....

    The easiest way to deal with this is go through what you job will be when you get on scene. Make a mental list this will help, keep going over and over in your mind. Sit back and enjoy the ride. Also as I have seen to many times don't try to go through the doors 2 or 3 at a time, This makes you look like "Key Stone Cops" (ask your parents). You all sound like a grate bunch of kids and would be honored to work with you.
    GFD748 First in... Last out.. Everyone goes home.... Do the best job you can and do it safely

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    Quote Originally Posted by the1141man View Post
    Funny.

    I almost forgot why it was I avoided this site for a few months, but genius comments like yours just now, and on the "Chief is getting on me" thread definitely helped remind me. Thanks!
    hey, did you like that thread? that was my thread, but they shut it down, which really sucks, cause i was getting a lot of good info from it.
    All men are created equal, then a few become firemen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GFD748 View Post
    This makes you look like "Key Stone Cops"
    I'm glad I wasn't the only one thinking that!!

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    Default Use the training

    Just remeber that when it hits the fan you have been trained for this - your guys will back you up and you will be amazed at how quickly you will follow your training steps.

    Just remeber that jokes stay in the truck. They can be good for breakin the tesion but if a bystander hears the wrong thing, they won't understand it and can (often will) take it the wrong way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrfireemt View Post
    hey, did you like that thread? that was my thread, but they shut it down, which really sucks, cause i was getting a lot of good info from it.
    jrfireemt, read what he wrot, i think it was sarcasm, mainly because immaturity is a waste of time!

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