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Thread: Observation

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    MembersZone Subscriber JohnVBFD's Avatar
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    Default Observation

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkgmhATQGVY

    **Disclaimer** I am not nitpicking or second guessing. This is only a training video

    Am I the only one who has a problem with the firefighter in this video at the head of the downed firefighter pulling the injured firefighter.

    Everything I have been taught is that the rescuer should pull towards him and keep his face forward sweeping the floor in front to ensure there IS a floor there.

    This firefighter has his back to his objective. To me? This would put me off my optium balance and center of gravity, make movement difficult, and most importantly lead to blind room movement.
    Co 11
    Virginia Beach FD

    Amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they cannot get it wrong. Which one are you?

    'The fire went out and nobody got hurt' is a poor excuse for a fireground critique.


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    Forum Member FIREGIRL4EVER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocVBFDE14 View Post
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkgmhATQGVY

    **Disclaimer** I am not nitpicking or second guessing. This is only a training video

    Am I the only one who has a problem with the firefighter in this video at the head of the downed firefighter pulling the injured firefighter.

    Everything I have been taught is that the rescuer should pull towards him and keep his face forward sweeping the floor in front to ensure there IS a floor there.

    This firefighter has his back to his objective. To me? This would put me off my optium balance and center of gravity, make movement difficult, and most importantly lead to blind room movement.
    I agree your suppose to pull looking ahead to sweep the floor and make sure no obstructions are in the way. Also the guy needs to strap on his helmet. Are chief would be having a fit.
    One firefighter....one passion. and one hell of a b!tch if you rub me the wrong way.


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    Forum Member GFD748's Avatar
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    We were taught 2 ways, the way they did in the video with the thought that the RIT team goes out the way they came in.

    And 2, Using a strap or rope around the shoulder straps on the scba, or through the rescue ring. I do agree this does look a little odd.
    GFD748 First in... Last out.. Everyone goes home.... Do the best job you can and do it safely

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    Forum Member st42stephenAFT's Avatar
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    We use two people usually in training. Depending on where the ff is down, and the conditions, we either drag them out, or we turn their air pack into a harness, and possibly use webbing to drag them out.

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    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
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    But there are 4 people minimum on the team, so the other 2 can check the floor on the way out. And being as you normally follow the same route out you followed in, holes in the floor will normally have been found going in.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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    MembersZone Subscriber JohnVBFD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GFD748 View Post
    We were taught 2 ways, the way they did in the video with the thought that the RIT team goes out the way they came in.

    And 2, Using a strap or rope around the shoulder straps on the scba, or through the rescue ring. I do agree this does look a little odd.
    My only beef is the position of the lead firefighter. As he is moving the downed firefighter, he is constantly off balance. This is from the unnatural motion of the body.

    Our legs muscles are stronger and possess more endurance than our back muscles. The lead firefighter in this video is mainly using his arms and back to muscle the victim. Yes the rear firefighter is also providing movement.

    If the lead firefighter turns around, grabs the SCBA harness or forms a loop with webbing and hooks it over his shoulder, that firefighter is now using his stronger leg muscles and moving the victim at a faster rate.

    The method in the video works. However for the one firefighters long term back health and career, is what I am thinking of.

    Bones42 But there are 4 people minimum on the team, so the other 2 can check the floor on the way out. And being as you normally follow the same route out you followed in, holes in the floor will normally have been found going in.

    True. However, using this video, lets say the lead does loose his balance and fall over. Now his orientation could be off. Other members outside the doorway can correct this, or an officer with a TIC.

    I think this type of rescue is more geared towards a non-FAST Co finding a downed member, or a member of a team dropping with his company around him.
    Co 11
    Virginia Beach FD

    Amateurs practice until they get it right; professionals practice until they cannot get it wrong. Which one are you?

    'The fire went out and nobody got hurt' is a poor excuse for a fireground critique.

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    MembersZone Subscriber dday05's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DocVBFDE14 View Post

    True. However, using this video, lets say the lead does loose his balance and fall over. Now his orientation could be off. Other members outside the doorway can correct this, or an officer with a TIC.

    I think this type of rescue is more geared towards a non-FAST Co finding a downed member, or a member of a team dropping with his company around him.
    The crew should have gone in with a rope. That would take care of the lack of being disoriented (hopefully) or unless they plan on going out a different way then they went in.

    The people doing this drill need to do more training in the packaging of the downed ff. I feel to much time was lost trying to get the belt around the ff's leg. The ff should start at the top of the scba and work their way down to secure the waist strap around the leg. Lets keep in mind these people are working in a visible area. People need to be training in smoke conditions with pretty much zero visibility to grasp how drastic this changes everything. When we drag someone we use ready pull or ready push. Alot of time is lost counting and draging. Also you could put a rope around the ff and have your horses pull from the out side.

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