Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Prior Navy

  1. #1
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    115

    Default Prior Navy

    Any of you prior Navy guys out there have any advice as far as employment with a career department is concerned upon completion of service. Thanks.


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    37

    Default

    I'm prior Navy too, seperated a little over a year ago. Veteran's preference usually adds 10% to whatever part of the scoring process that a dept. chooses, sometimes only 5% though.

    For example, I recently took a test that had 650 applicants and they took the top 10% from the written score, invited them to their specifically designed and graded PAT, which was much more difficult than the CPAT, and gave the candidates that passed the PAT an oral board. If a candidate received atleast a 70% on the oral board, then their veteran's preference was added to their overall score. I finished #7 on that list and would have been around #20 - HUGE DIFFERENCE. Another dept. I just tested for added 10% to the written test score and now it's on me to pass their physical and sell them during the board.

    Your Navy time won't give you a free ticket whatsoever, regardless of your rate or ranking, so just get used to starting over completely. However, as you can see, VP can really help out! Also, your Navy experience will make your oral boards much easier to prepare for and you do need to prepare for the oral board extensively! The one board that I completed, beamed with smiles as I told them stories from Navy experiences that related to why I would be a great firefighter. Your in the right place, learn all you can about the hiring process, as fast as you can. Pick up some written test prep, devote a day to reading all of these threads, create a resume, and start preparing verbally, the reasons why you are going to be a great firefighter. Enjoy the process and don't hesitate to email me if you've got more questions.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,047

    Default

    Thanks for serving our country. Here is some information for men and women who are seeking a career in the fire service after their military commitment is completed.
    Military Experience
    Candidates who have served our country in the Armed Forces have a huge advantage over those who have not. It is generally believed that while a military veterans may not have as many certificates and fire science units as the other candidates (they were busy serving our country), they offer so much more.
    There is no substitute for life experience. The personal growth a young man or woman experiences in the military is second to none. This growth is of course magnified depending on the assignments held. Many of those who joined the military at a young age grew up very rapidly when put into dangerous situations.
    Being assigned to the front line is not required to get “credit” for serving in the military. Fire departments realize that there are many support roles that require dedication and commitment. While there is only one person on the nozzle that puts out the fire, there are numerous other assignments that need to take place on the fire ground. It is important that a firefighter be willing to work in a support role for the good of the team.
    The fire service is a para-military organization. Many of the common terms in the fire service, such as Captain and lieutenants were taken directly from the military. Words like code, honor, commitment, and integrity are as important to the fire service as they are to the military.
    Men and women with military backgrounds are usually very mature, regardless of their age. They understand the need to get along with others, especially with people who come from different backgrounds from them. They understand commitment and the need to work until the job is completed. They are used to working for long periods of time in less than ideal conditions.
    Physical fitness is emphasized in the military. As a result military men and women are usually in very good shape. This is extremely important to the fire service, because the number one reason entry-level candidates fail out of the academy is due to poor physical fitness. In addition, a physically fit firefighter will miss less time due to injury than a firefighter who is not fit. Military personnel have been taught the importance of a life-long physical fitness program and the importance of proper diet. These good habits will be shared with the firefighters in the station.
    Military people demonstrate respect for authority and understand the chain of command. The fire service operates on the same hierarchy principle as the military. The group clearly understands code and honor. These qualities are extremely important in the fire service, because firefighters are held to a higher standard than the average person in the community.
    Military men and women are used to working in a structured environment. They understand the importance of doing something right the first time. Similar to the fire department, people’s lives are impacted if things are not kept in a constant state of operational readiness. Firefighters must check out their equipment each and every day. They must know the intricacies of each tool kept on the engine or truck. Training and continuing education are essential to the fire service. It is imperative that firefighters are able to work unsupervised; completion of a job or task is a reflection of them.
    Getting along in the fire station is critically important to being successful in the fire service. Courtesy to fellow firefighters is critical. Cleaning up after one self is expected. This is one of the first things military men and women learn in Basic Training.
    One of the strengths found in military men and women, however, is also commonly a cause of strife during their probationary year. People who have earned rank in the military are used to giving orders. As a rookie firefighter you are expected to take orders, not give them. Humility is an extremely important quality to possess as a rookie firefighter. Oftentimes rookie firefighters who have spent time in the military are older than the average candidate.
    It is not uncommon for an older probationary firefighter to be working under the tutelage of a much younger senior firefighter, engineer, or even lieutenant or captain. If the rookie firefighter does not have the proper mind set, he or she will be in for a difficult probationary year.
    If you are still in the military and are interested in a career in the fire service, it is important that you start making provisions NOW. Start taking online classes NOW.
    If possible, put yourself in a position to get fire service-related training such as Medic or Corpsman. Hazardous Materials and firefighter training will also be beneficial. Lastly, work on general education courses so you can earn your Associates degree.
    Do not be intimidated by all of the candidates who have every certification under the sun. They were able to obtain these as full-time students while you were busy fulfilling your continuous to the American people.
    A candidate who is an EMT, possesses related experience as a reserve or volunteer firefighter, and is active taking fire science courses is usually at the top of his or her game. Get your qualifications, learn how to take a fire department interview, and earn your badge.


    Paul Lepore
    Battalion Chief
    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

  4. #4
    Forum Member JayDudley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,272

    Thumbs up Navy

    Many years ago I was in the Navy (Damage Control) discharged and entered into the Fire Service. 30 + years later retired and am doing fine. So I say go for it , it's out there for the taking.

    Good Luck,
    Jay
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
    Retired Fire
    Background Investigator
    IACOJ-Member
    Lifetime Member CSFA
    IAFF Alumni Member

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Here, There, Everywhere
    Posts
    4,191

    Default In the NAVY!!!! You can sail the 7 Sea's...In the NAVY!

    I saw this band that needed an occasional replacement member for when one of their members was unable to make the show....

    http://www.daytondailynews.com/share...lagepeople.jpg



    FTM-PTB

  6. #6
    Forum Member JayDudley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    1,272

    Talking There's always one

    There is always one who see's through the crux of a problem. LOL
    Respectfully,
    Jay Dudley
    Retired Fire
    Background Investigator
    IACOJ-Member
    Lifetime Member CSFA
    IAFF Alumni Member

  7. #7
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Green Bay
    Posts
    1,031

    Default

    Along with the advice of veterans points and such, your best bet would be to use your GI Bill and education bebefits to get a formal education and a degree. Many depts today do require some college and not just FF certs, many ask for A.S. or higher degrees for advancement and many dept seek paramedics. You have the benies, might as well use them.

    Also the miltary experience helps to the fact that you have worked in a chain of command, worked under pressure, understand detail and discipline and such. It is those qualifications that are looked upon more so than the job you did while in. There are many former military who never had any FF training and are successful FF's.

    Shipboard FF and structural FF are night and day. There are similarities and you can gain a lot of knowledge from the service. However, even if you were an OSL or Team Leader, or Locker Leader on a fire party, doesn't mean you will be a good civilian FF. Use that knowledge to stand out, like being an OSL, you get command experience and have to make split second decisions and so forth. As a FF that experience can help you by you being able to know why the IC sent you on a certain task, or if they may have missed something, you could pick it up etc. Also working with fire systems and such gives you an idea of how they work when doing inspections etc.

    I was DC while in the service and I have used much of my Navy experience to help get a job, but never depended on the service experience alone. CBR can relate to HazMat, OSL as IC, you also learn shoring and SCBA and aggressive FF tactics, but don't depend on that experience alone. Get the education.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts