1. #1

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    Default Non-typical Rescue Tools

    Hey Folks,

    What tools do you carry besides the typical or normal "auto extrication" tools?
    I am referring to tools or equipment that might be used in Industrial, Farm or Machinery or the odd ball rescues? What works good and what doesn't of these tools?

    We are looking into beefing up our rescue capabilities from a rescue pumper to a Heavy Rescue service. I try to think outside of the normal thought process when it comes to capabilities and equipment. I believe if you are going to be in the rescue business, be in the business.

    Thanks,
    RN

  2. #2
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    If you are going to a true rescue and all the compartment space that comes with it then the sky is the limit. I would always rather have what you think is overkill because it only takes one run to prove its not.

    In my opinion, you can't have enough hand tools such as socket sets, adjustable wrenches, box wrenches, screwdrivers, etc. We also carry an entire line of air powered tools with the air chisel being popular on bus and truck extrications, but also the 'whizzer' cutoff wheel and the impact wrench options have proved invaluable. In a 'man in machine' scenario you are often faced with disassembling the machine... Its up to the service technician to put it back together. DeWalt actually makes a cordless impact wrench now as well. I just watch the guy install my new garage door and he said he loves it. That will probably get added to our equipment list. We also carry both air powered(with a Pancake compressor) and Paslode cordless nailers(framing and roofing) for shoring ops and for basic boardups after structure fires.

    Thats a start... Just remember that when in doubt people call the FD so if it seems bizarre, you should probably buy it you'll need it tomorrow if you don't

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    Hacksaws work great for extrication in a pinch. You can even double blade them, one in each direction to maximize cutting. Have 4-6 of the so you can just grab another when the blade breaks or dulls. A come along is also good to have for roll ups and other situations. Sounds like you are on the right track with you thinking already. If you think a tool can be used, it can. Just remember to train and train to make sure that everyone knows what they tools are for.
    Jason Brooks
    IAFF Local 2388
    IACOJ

  4. #4
    Savage / Hyneman 08'

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    Just a few thoughts off the top of my head...

    FFTrainer is so very right about hand tools. So many things people become trapped in just can't be defeated with the standard ( insert favorite brand name here ) hydraulic rescue tools. Good hand tools that run on air or battery power for more productivity.

    For cutting, consumable abrasive blades are cheap and can get thru metal and concrete. Standard toothed saw blades are good, but think of a coolant / lubricant to help extend the life greatly. A soap and water mix in a squeeze bottle is cheap, non-flammable, non-toxic, and works pretty well. Just don't use to much soap. Gets sticky and the metal cuttings don't get washed away, they just stick and clump.

    For the ultimate in cutting metal, don't forget the mighty Oxy-Acetelyn cutting torch. Might take a bit of practice if you have never used it, but very effective. The obvious downside: It's on fire.

    For lifting, spreading, pulling, or ramming, try the Hi-Lift jack. These have been around longer than I have and have many uses. Try an internet search for a sample of ideas. With the right accessories ( chain, straps, hooks, pipe for ram, base plate ) you can do a lot.

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    And get a set of O plates from Rescue42 to go with those Hi-lifts.A tool of many uses.Exothermic torch can be handy on occasion.Once again,I'm in agreement with Trainer,you can never have enough hand tools.Some static rope and a few snatch blocks can come in handy. T.C.

  6. #6
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    We carry a section of tree trunk on our rescue. Has about a 14" diameter and is about 12" tall. It's from an old oak tree and is pretty solid. It's not used much anymore, but still gets pulled out for some training. We use it when pulling/lifting steering columns. Throw the chain from "front" over it down to steering column, and it gives a good, solid fulcrum.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  7. #7
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    I agree with the hand tools, HiLift jacks, and exothermic torches. You may consider a GripHoist and some snatch blocks too.
    Developer and Sr. Presenter, Team Xtreme
    BIG RIG RESCUE

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    Sawsall, both battery and plug in are great for cutting "A" posts when popping the roof of a car.
    Slop sink, Flags and pump 150
    Getting there is half the fun

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    This is an extrication forum, but if you are going to a heavy rescue, be sure to think multi purpose. In heavy rescue extrication is just a small part of the job. As we all know, no matter how big the truck is the compartments fell up fast.
    The plain old bottle jack can have a million uses in extrication, building collapse, machinery rescue, and many others. A lot of times they can go where our rams canít, and donít just think big, a 1 ton jack will work lying on its side and 2000 lbs can do a lot of pushing when you need it.
    A few steel pickets and ratchet straps are another that has hundreds of uses in all fields of rescue.
    These kinds of tools have hundreds of uses and take up very little space on the truck.
    http://www.midsouthrescue.org
    Is it time to change our training yet ?

  10. #10
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    As with most rescue trucks, the firefighters that are assigned to it are a different breed of thinking. Give them a screwdriver and they can make a hammer. Take what you currently have and think of different ways to use it.

    Today's firefighters are expecting someone to make a tool for them for every situation. Learn to be creative enough to use what's already on the truck. It's what makes firefighters inventive.

  11. #11
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    A good strong come along has many uses in heavy rescue. Affordable and they dont take up much room on the rig.

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