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  1. #1
    Forum Member SFD13's Avatar
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    A Baltimore fire recruit who was killed in a February training exercise was not ready to be sent into a burning dwelling, had failed agility tests and had been given old protective gear that frayed and failed to protect her from the intense heat, according to a report prepared for the mayor.

    The 121-page report by an independent investigator, obtained yesterday by The Sun, adds new details to the death of Racheal M. Wilson and places much of the blame on her instructor, who investigators say abandoned her in the burning rowhouse, and on other mid-level fire commanders, three of whom have already been fired.

    It describes a chaotic scene conducted by instructors who acted with little oversight and concludes that 50 national safety standards were violated during the exercise, more than the 36 previously acknowledged by the city and the department.

    Fire Chief William J. Goodwin Jr., who has been criticized for allowing lax standards at the training academy he once headed, is mentioned once in the detailed report, in a paragraph in which investigators note that he was unaware that the live-fire exercises would take place.

    Mayor Sheila Dixon, who commissioned the investigation, is expected to release the report publicly Thursday after Wilson's family has had a chance to read it. She refused to discuss the contents yesterday.

    The lead investigator, Howard County Deputy Fire Chief Chris Shimer, concluded his report by expressing hope that other departments would learn from the mistakes made by Baltimore firefighters.

    "The ultimate sacrifice by Racheal Wilson should serve as a reminder to fire officials everywhere that rules and standards are developed for a reason," Shimer wrote. "The primary reason is to ensure that we keep our personnel safe so they may return home each and every day to their loved ones."

    Two previous investigations into the Feb. 9 fire on South Calverton Road have revealed dozens of violations of national safety standards, including the setting of seven or eight fires instead of the one that is permitted, the lack of radios for some instructors, the failure to clear debris from the vacant dwelling and the failure to brief students before the exercise.

    The report was based on a six-month investigation into what occurred during the fatal fire, but it also scrutinized other practices, finding "systematic problems" at the training academy.

    It includes graphics, photographs and 19 appendices. Toward the end of the report, Shimer concludes that the fire academy is governed by an "unacceptable" view that "recruits must be exposed to heavy fire conditions in order to be adequately prepared for the field.

    "These practices are unacceptable and may lead to serious injury and in this case death," the report says.

    After the fire, three commanders lost their jobs. Division Chief Kenneth Hyde, who was head of the academy when Wilson died, was fired by Dixon in February. Lt. Joseph Crest, the instructor in charge of the fire, and Lt. Barry Broyles, who was supposed to be in charge of an unprepared rescue team, were fired on the recommendation of a panel of their peers.

    Goodwin has said that the Fire Department needs to focus more on safety and has taken steps to improve it. He replaced most of the staff at the training academy, obtained grants for radios, increased the department's safety office operation and started to rotate all midlevel battalion chiefs, in part because of a belief that they had grown too close to their men and were not reporting safety violations.

    Investigators noted that Goodwin was interviewed and that the Fire Department was mostly cooperative, with the exception of three key people.

    Lt. Eugene Jones, who was supposed to light fires at the fatal burn, would not allow officials from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives to interview him. Tarnisha Lee, a firefighter paramedic who lit some of the fires in the rowhouse, would submit to only a brief interview with investigators.

    Hyde, who was in charge of the training academy, initially cooperated with investigators but stopped participating on the advice of his lawyer, according to the report.

    The report examined for the first time a similar training exercise that was conducted Feb. 8 on Sinclair Lane, the day before the fatal burn. Investigators found that national safety standards were violated there, too, something that Fire Department spokesmen have denied.

    From watching a video of that fire, investigators determined that instructors lit more than one fire, recruits entered and exited the burning building without being accompanied by instructors and a recruit left the building with what appeared to be burning debris on his or her back and neck.

    Instructors were not wearing their face pieces properly, the report says. One recruit, Daniel Nott, was injured after removing his mask and suffering burns to his face. Lt. Sam Darby, an instructor, suffered a burn on his hand at that fire.

    "It is obvious to an observer of this video that the fire is beyond the capabilities of a recruit class, especially one with minimal training," the report says.

    Problems with class

    Even before the back-to-back training fires on Sinclair Lane and South Calverton Road, the recruit class had problems, it says.

    As officials were selecting members for Class 19 in November 2006, they overlooked Wilson's having failed one section of a seven-part agility test given to recruits before they can enter the class. Disregarding physical fitness is a common practice, the report says.

    In early 2006, Wilson, who was a civilian working in the Fire Marshal's office, applied to the academy. She took an agility test but was rejected.

    She took the agility test again in November 2006 and failed. The report says she was 10 seconds too slow on the "tower walk," a timed drill during which recruits wearing weighted vests must climb and descend the steps at the fire academy's six-story fire tower.

    Wilson was accepted into the November 2006 class, however, even though the report says she had scored better the first time she took the agility test and did a better job on four of the five stations. That indicates that her physical conditioning had deteriorated from the time she initially applied to the fire academy and was rejected.

    Wilson's autopsy found that she was 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighed 192 pounds.

    "Racheal's physical stature may have presented some challenge to her becoming a firefighter," the report says.

    Other problems were noticed. Wilson's instructors told investigators that during training she "had a propensity for removing her face piece" and said that she had trouble holding the nozzle of a hose under pressure. Instructors never documented their concerns and allowed her to progress through the academy without mastering those skills, the report says.

    Wilson was holding a nozzle the day of the fatal fire, though she had never done so successfully in a live fire. As had occurred during previous training exercises, she was knocked backward when she opened it to spray water on a second-floor fire.

    The day of the training fire on Calverton Road, the department issued her a pair of pants that had "significant problems," including worn knee patches and a hole in the fly, the report says.

    Wilson's autopsy found that her thigh and leg were seriously burned, and investigators concluded that her turnout gear "was not adequate for interior fire fighting."

    The report says that the "crotch had no integrity, and thermal protection in the crotch had diminished. It may have accounted for serious burns in her lower extremities."

    The report gives a detailed account of what occurred within the rowhouse.

    The recruits had never been given a thorough walk through the building or a clear plan for attacking the fire, and the report says the little information they were given turned out to be wrong. They were told that there would be no fire on the first floor, but when they walked in the back door of the building they were met with fire.

    Two recruits said they had questions about what they were supposed to do before entering the building. Their instructor, Capt. Louis Lago, said he did not have time to answer them, "presumably due to the fact that the fires had already been ignited," the report says.

    Wilson's crew, led by Ryan Wenger, an emergency vehicle driver, was ordered to take a crew of recruits to the third floor, bypassing a fire on the second level, a practice typically used only if firefighters are rescuing someone.

    Wenger told investigators that he had concerns about carrying out that order but suppressed his worries in the belief that if he objected, somebody else more cooperative would be put in his place, the report says.

    Wenger was told that the crew behind him would put out the fire on the second floor. That group was delayed as it tried to put out the unexpected fire that had been set in first-floor room filled with debris that included tires, mattresses, branches and a television set, the report says.

    "To extinguish the fire, the crew had to place the nozzle under the debris, which materially delayed their response to the second floor," the report says.

    When Wenger got his crew to the third floor, he fell to his knees because of the heat.

    "The heat was unbearable even while on his knees, but he apparently did not think about retreating and getting his crew out of the building," the report says.

    Another recruit, Stephanie Cisneros, approached Wenger and said she thought she should get out of the building. It was then that Wenger began evacuating his team. He did not have a radio and could not call for help.

    After Wenger helped Cisneros get out, Wilson said she wanted to leave. Rather than helping her out first, Wenger pulled himself out of the burning building and then tried to pull her out. He lifted her torso, hand and arms but could not get her out.

    "He asked her if she could help him, and she replied that she could not help, as she was burning up and could not take the heat," the report says.

    Wenger lost his grip, and Wilson fell back into the building. He grabbed her a second time. She remained conscious and talked to Wenger, saying that she was "burning up," according to the report. The skin on her face was blistering from the heat.

    Her mask started coming off during the rescue attempts, but investigators say they could not conclude whether she took it off or if it slipped off.

    Two other recruits tried to help her out of the building, and Michael Hiebler, an emergency vehicle driver, lifted her legs out.

    The initial Fire Department report suggested that Wilson's boot might have become caught in the room's faulty floor, hampering her escape. The report concludes that Wilson's left boot became lost but most likely did not become "entangled" in the debris.

    `Flashover' suspected

    Other recruits and firefighters in the building described conditions that investigators said could have been a "flashover," a dangerous situation in which the heat inside a building becomes so intense that all surfaces ignite.

    While a rescue of Wilson was being attempted, an unknown number of firefighters entered the building. At some point, all of the other recruits got out, but nobody sounded an evacuation horn and nobody kept track of who was inside the building and who was outside, so a proper head count was impossible.

    After the fire, two top staff members at the academy said that they had expressed reservations about the class.

    Crest told investigators that he was "uncomfortable with the majority of the class," the report says.

    Capt. Terry Horrocks told investigators that he had asked Hyde not to take the class to the burn.

    Neither formally documented their objections, and investigators found no way of verifying that those conversations took place.

    annie.linskey@baltsun.com
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    In early 2006, Wilson, who was a civilian working in the Fire Marshal's office, applied to the academy. She took an agility test but was rejected.

    She took the agility test again in November 2006 and failed.

    hmm, sounds like we have a problem here.

    Wilson was accepted into the November 2006 class, however, even though the report says she had scored better the first time she took the agility test and did a better job on four of the five stations. That indicates that her physical conditioning had deteriorated from the time she initially applied to the fire academy and was rejected.
    so they tested her again, she did worse this time, but they hired her anyways? not good.

    Wilson's autopsy found that she was 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighed 192 pounds.
    5'04" and 192lbs would be a Body Mass Index of 33, or "obese".
    http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/bmicalc.htm
    Calculate your BMI - Standard BMI Calculator


    Wilson's instructors told investigators that during training she "had a propensity for removing her face piece" and said that she had trouble holding the nozzle of a hose under pressure. Instructors never documented their concerns and allowed her to progress through the academy without mastering those skills, the report says...As had occurred during previous training exercises, she was
    knocked backward when she opened it to spray water on a second-floor fire.

    why wasn't this documented? were the other recruits also unable to hold an open nozzle? sounds like this was a tragedy waiting to happen.


    It would seem that this recruit may have not been meeting training standards.This would cause some to ask why she was allowed to continue training.
    Could this have been avoided if the hiring standards had been followed?
    Could this have been avoided if they had not allowed a recruit that couldnt hold an open nozzle into a live burn?

    The failure to meet the National Standards for live burns will be dealt with; I wonder if the city will find fault for allowing an unqualified recruit into a live burn, or for that matter hiring her anyways.
    I have a funny feeling they won't deal with that part at all.

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    Thanks, Shuswap.

    Very enlightening.

    Rest in peace, Racheal.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitllesmertz1 View Post
    In early 2006, Wilson, who was a civilian working in the Fire Marshal's office, applied to the academy. She took an agility test but was rejected.

    She took the agility test again in November 2006 and failed.

    hmm, sounds like we have a problem here.

    Wilson was accepted into the November 2006 class, however, even though the report says she had scored better the first time she took the agility test and did a better job on four of the five stations. That indicates that her physical conditioning had deteriorated from the time she initially applied to the fire academy and was rejected.
    so they tested her again, she did worse this time, but they hired her anyways? not good.

    Wilson's autopsy found that she was 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighed 192 pounds.
    5'04" and 192lbs would be a Body Mass Index of 33, or "obese".
    http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/bmicalc.htm
    Calculate your BMI - Standard BMI Calculator


    Wilson's instructors told investigators that during training she "had a propensity for removing her face piece" and said that she had trouble holding the nozzle of a hose under pressure. Instructors never documented their concerns and allowed her to progress through the academy without mastering those skills, the report says...As had occurred during previous training exercises, she was
    knocked backward when she opened it to spray water on a second-floor fire.

    why wasn't this documented? were the other recruits also unable to hold an open nozzle? sounds like this was a tragedy waiting to happen.


    It would seem that this recruit may have not been meeting training standards.This would cause some to ask why she was allowed to continue training.
    Could this have been avoided if the hiring standards had been followed?
    Could this have been avoided if they had not allowed a recruit that couldnt hold an open nozzle into a live burn?

    The failure to meet the National Standards for live burns will be dealt with; I wonder if the city will find fault for allowing an unqualified recruit into a live burn, or for that matter hiring her anyways.
    I have a funny feeling they won't deal with that part at all.
    Whilst I am sincerely sorry for the death of this trainee--if a tried and tested way of selection succeeds time after time, why do "they" alter the rules to accommodate people who would never,ever get into the job,under the old criteria?
    If you study this picture of a typical LFB Pump Escape(and yes this was taken at an actual fire I attended in the mid '60's) you will note the Escape Ladder weighs One and a Quarter tons-yes 2,800 Pounds--it took a crew of 4 men to slip and pitch it(note I said men)-we will not even go into the fact that mounted on top right side cab roof are two Hook Ladders(you call them Pompeir?)--no woman I have ever heard of has ever used a Escape Ladder or Hook Ladder-why you ask? Because they were got rid of before "they" employed women in the job--now it was OK to tell a man that he was not up to the standard, but in the PC world you must not say the same to a woman
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    This is not enlightening. This is a description of a murder.

    Don't even try to make this the recruit's fault. This is a complete and utter failure of the Baltimore FD to adequately protect her. If she was not physically qualified, they failed her by taking her. If she was not qualified to go into that burn, they failed her by making her go in.

    They also failed her by violating virtually every, single provision of NFPA 1403. Every one!

    They also failed her by repeating the actions that had killed fire fighters before in Milford, Boulder, etc.

    In my opinion, Hyde, Crest, Broyles and Goodwin-yes, Goodwin-killed Rachael Wilson.

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    While I certainly agree with Mr Wendt, my point was that the failure to meet the NFPA standards will be addressed, hopefully severely.
    But I doubt that the bypassing of certain standards to facilitate the hiring of under-represented groups will be discussed at all.

    Bottom line is if they had followed there own hiring rules, she wouldn't have been in a situation where she was physically unable to hold an open nozzle in a burning bldg.

    Tragedy is an understatement.

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    This is freaking disgusting.

    I agree that the recruit should not be blamed wholly for this. Maybe perhaps about 0.0000000000000000000000000000 000000000000000001% of it is her fault for not recognizing that she might be endangered by this. Many of us been blinded by our own ambition about things in life.

    Genernorming gets people killed. These people (apparently) KNOWINGLY put an ill equipped and ill-ready individual into a fire. WHAT THE F@CK WERE THESE PEOPLE THINKING?

    People are so afraid to drop people for failure to perform. There are minor things that you can overlook here and there that may be corrected when tehy get to a company - acceptable but not stellar performance on drils etc.. - but for crying out loud, if a person is going to take their mask off in a freaking fire, fails NOT 1 but 2 freaking agility test evaluations, you have to stop and ask yourself:

    1) should this person be doing the job?

    2) would I want this person on my company with me if they are substandard?

    This stuff goes on way too much in society. It is unacceptable in the fire service community. Standards exist for a reason. When I went through the academy 8 years ago I agreed to abide by the rules and understood that if I did not pass the first time, I would get 1 retest. If I failed again, I was gone and dropped to the next class.

    This crap is unacceptable. Now a mother is dead, criminal charges are pending, people have been fired, the city is being sued, and it was all avoidable. We knew a trainee death was avoidable from the get go, but this makes it all the more disgusting and unbelievable.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeorgeWendtCFI View Post
    This is not enlightening. This is a description of a murder.

    Don't even try to make this the recruit's fault. This is a complete and utter failure of the Baltimore FD to adequately protect her. If she was not physically qualified, they failed her by taking her. If she was not qualified to go into that burn, they failed her by making her go in.

    They also failed her by violating virtually every, single provision of NFPA 1403. Every one!

    They also failed her by repeating the actions that had killed fire fighters before in Milford, Boulder, etc.

    In my opinion, Hyde, Crest, Broyles and Goodwin-yes, Goodwin-killed Rachael Wilson.
    OK it's not even 5:30 in the morning and I've been up about 5 minutes ..... first thread I've read. DON'T FREAKIN' PUT WORDS IN MY MOUTH!!!!

    All I said was the article was enlightening, not WHY I thought it was enlightening and I CERTAINLY DID NOT BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION SAY THIS WAS RACHEAL'S FAULT.
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    I'm going to say it and I am not too concerned if it is taken the wrong way or not because it's been what I have been thinking the entire time. After her death there was no remorse, there was no sorrow, there was no apology on behalf of those who were supposed to be training her, there was only, "She shouldn't have been here in the first place."

    I cannot help but wonder if someone in their infinite wisdom was trying to teach her that lesson. They almost lost three recruits that day, this could have been much, much worse than it was. It is already a horrible tragedy. Sending recruits into a live burn, in what sounds like lightweight construction and continuing to light fires behind them, not sending in a training officer, no experience inside this burning structure and ill fitting or possibly sub-standard gear. It disgusts me, it has since this poor woman died and left her children parentless.

    The first post in this thread clearly is not a report, but a letter based on opinion and what appears to be hearsay (heard or read) and is shamelessly blaming a woman who was training to do the job she wanted to do. If someone felt along the way that she should not have been hired and was not fit enough to be hired, how about not hiring her, or grieving it because she didn't pass a portion of the test, or simply talking to her, or hell, maybe even helping her become better at what she was doing and teach her like a real instructor and training officer should do; especially men with a great deal of experience and supposedly a little common sense... and maybe, just maybe not kill her.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaSharkie View Post
    This is freaking disgusting.

    I agree that the recruit should not be blamed wholly for this. Maybe perhaps about 0.0000000000000000000000000000 000000000000000001% of it is her fault for not recognizing that she might be endangered by this. Many of us been blinded by our own ambition about things in life.

    Genernorming gets people killed. These people (apparently) KNOWINGLY put an ill equipped and ill-ready individual into a fire. WHAT THE F@CK WERE THESE PEOPLE THINKING?

    People are so afraid to drop people for failure to perform. There are minor things that you can overlook here and there that may be corrected when tehy get to a company - acceptable but not stellar performance on drils etc.. - but for crying out loud, if a person is going to take their mask off in a freaking fire, fails NOT 1 but 2 freaking agility test evaluations, you have to stop and ask yourself:

    1) should this person be doing the job?

    2) would I want this person on my company with me if they are substandard?

    This stuff goes on way too much in society. It is unacceptable in the fire service community. Standards exist for a reason. When I went through the academy 8 years ago I agreed to abide by the rules and understood that if I did not pass the first time, I would get 1 retest. If I failed again, I was gone and dropped to the next class.

    This crap is unacceptable. Now a mother is dead, criminal charges are pending, people have been fired, the city is being sued, and it was all avoidable. We knew a trainee death was avoidable from the get go, but this makes it all the more disgusting and unbelievable.
    Exactly correct...but if you ask a certain segment of society she had "heart" and really wanted the job and that means more to some people than actual ability and competetance.(keep in mind my comments aren't an excusal for the Training staff and their actions)

    I know for a fact that this isn't the only department who has had certain people pushed through an accademy and I'm honestly surprised that this much information even made the press as it isn't exactly PC.

    5'4" and 192! What is the physical training like in that accademy...what happened to competitive physical standards for hiring in Civil service?...please don't tell me they use the CPAT.

    It is unfortuneate that she lost her life and the people that should have taken the responsiblity to stand up and tell her she wasn't fit for this job were I imagine bullied into letting her (and who knows how many others) slip through.

    I know there were men in my accademy class who couldn't perform physically and for thier own safety, ours and that of the citizens of the City of New York they resigned...not everyone can be a firefighter.

    May she rest in peace and may this feel good PC nonsense come to end with this loss of her life. Establishment of rigourous physical and performance standards and ensuring they are met for all accademy canidates would be a good first step in the right direction...

    Unfortunately a certain "protected class" of people might get in the way of this laudable goal...and we'll end up with the same diluted gendernormed garbage similar to the CPAT.

    FTM-PTB

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    I've said it before and I will say it again. This was criminal and there should be charges. These men committed murder. They did exactly the same thing that Alan Baird did in Lairdsville. But it is worse here. This is supposed to be a professional training academy, they are supposed to know the rules. And how could anyone not know the rules especially after Lairdsville. Why does the fire service keep making the same mistakes over and over and over?

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    Quote Originally Posted by RspctFrmCalgary View Post
    OK it's not even 5:30 in the morning and I've been up about 5 minutes ..... first thread I've read. DON'T FREAKIN' PUT WORDS IN MY MOUTH!!!!

    All I said was the article was enlightening, not WHY I thought it was enlightening and I CERTAINLY DID NOT BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION SAY THIS WAS RACHEAL'S FAULT.
    I used your word (enlightening) because I do not agree with you. However, you did not, in any way, make the insinuation that it was Rachael's fault. Another poster made that insinuation. I was addressing two posts, which is the reason I did not quote a particular post.

    I think a read-through of the posts will reveal who that comment was directed at. And, Sherry, it wasn't you.

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    If Mr Wendt is implying I feel the recruit is to blame, let's clear that up:
    No, she's not.
    All clear?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mitllesmertz1 View Post
    If Mr Wendt is implying I feel the recruit is to blame, let's clear that up:
    No, she's not.
    All clear?
    Guilty conscience, dude? I didn't mention your name.

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    The recruit is absolutely not to blame here, for any of this incident. She is nothing more than a victim, and itís a terrible story.
    If we want to start placing blame, we need to look at the department and the policies they used for this specific live burn.
    Fire service instructors, at a live burn with new recruits have an awesome responsibility. It is awesome because it so encompassing. A live burn instructor, particularly at an acquired structure is absolutely responsible for every action their recruits perform at that event. Every evolution performed has to be covered A-Z because fire can and will kill; obviously.
    The actions that new recruits take in live fire evolutions, even towards the end of recruit training, are very difficult to predict. These arenít experienced, seasoned firefighters who have seen any true work, who have had exposure to high heat and zero visibility. These are brand new firefighters who need to be led by the hand and taught. This woman wasnít.

    If she wasnít physically able to perform the job of a firefighter, I place that blame on the cityís police and fire commission, or human resources, or whoever hires Baltimoreís firefighters. It is their fault for not putting recruits into their academy who can perform firefighting.

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    Clearly you cannot blame the recruit. We have all seen recruits that can't honestly see or understand the limitations they may face. That is why we employ experienced intructors to lead these evolutions. In this case, that and the supervision process seemed to be the failure point.


    I was pretty floored when I saw the physical stats. I could honestly understand hiring like that in a small-town volley dept, that struggles for members. Many of us have brought on and maintain less than ideal members/FF's (but hopefully with restrictions on duty), but even that practice is often scrutinized. But in a major city like BALTIMORE??? Wow! Unexpected for sure.

    My first thoughts are that somebody had some friends with influence, or the Baltimore employment equal rights program has gone waaaay too far. It is sad that she is receiving the finger pointing though, as the system appeared to fail her miserably.
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    In line-of-duty deaths, like Recruit Wilson's, there are almost always a number of contributing factors that ultimately result in the fatality. Like links in a chain, if you take away any one of those factors the death will not occur.

    As I see it, three links contributed to Recruit Wilson's death, none of which were her fault. She was a recruit, not a firefighter, and should not be expected to have the knowledge and judgement that comes with experience.

    First, the academy staff by all accounts failed miserably at their most important function, to keep their trainees safe. One has to wonder if anyone present even knew of the existence of NFPA 1403. Perhaps the instructor's training was not up to par, who knows?

    Second, for the academy to fail so thoroughly, the fire department administration had to fail completely at it's responsibility for oversight of the academy. The Chief of Department is like the captain of a ship and is ultimately responsible for everything that happens under his command. All that shiny brass and stripes on the sleeve comes with the heavy burden of responsibility, a burden that Chief Goodwin has so far only done a fancy juggling act with.

    Third, as many here have stated or alluded to, Recruit Wilson should never have been hired in the first place. She was in way over her head and there was no lifeguard on duty. To be grossly obese, fail the physical agility test twice, and still get hired is mind-boggling. Why even bother to give an agility test if you're going to hire people who don't pass? Who made the decision to hire her and why?

    And yet, Chief Goodwin "disputed the report's conclusion that Wilson was unprepared, saying she 'absolutely' should have been accepted to the academy despite falling 10 seconds short on a test that required her to run up and down a six-story tower in four minutes and 30 seconds. 'We didn't accept the people who took 14 minutes,' Goodwin said. About the recommendation that recruits must pass a physical fitness test to gain a space in the academy classes, Goodwin said: 'I rose to chief and I never took one.'" It sounds like Goodwin doesn't even understand the importance of hiring physically fit, capable firefighters...or is he just trying to juggle that troublesome responsibility thing again?

    It's a shame that Rachael Wilson died. It's is a shame that her children will grow up without their mother, and it's a shame that was hired in the first place.

  18. #18
    Forum Member martinm's Avatar
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    I find is utterly amazing that the Chief Fire Officer (and therefore the one with which the buck stops), has stated that he does nto see the value of appliacants taking a fitness test in order to gain a place at the fire acadamy, stating, "I rose to the rank of Chief and never took one".

    How can he remain in his position after making a comment such as this?
    United Kingdom branch, IACOJ.

  19. #19
    Forum Member DaSharkie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinm View Post
    I find is utterly amazing that the Chief Fire Officer (and therefore the one with which the buck stops), has stated that he does nto see the value of appliacants taking a fitness test in order to gain a place at the fire acadamy, stating, "I rose to the rank of Chief and never took one".

    How can he remain in his position after making a comment such as this?
    This Chief seems to be a maroon.
    "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

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  20. #20
    Forum Member Higby916's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martinm View Post
    I find is utterly amazing that the Chief Fire Officer (and therefore the one with which the buck stops), has stated that he does nto see the value of appliacants taking a fitness test in order to gain a place at the fire acadamy, stating, "I rose to the rank of Chief and never took one".

    How can he remain in his position after making a comment such as this?
    And we see what has happened under his leadership.
    Vita brevis; terra larga.

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