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    Default Armed Forces and the fire dept?

    I was wondering if the rumor is true that big citys like Boston and New York favor recruits that have a military background.

    Also which branch of services has the best fire dept to get into if someone enlisted?

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    They give veterans credit of 10 points(but to get it you have to serve in a combat zone), Air Force has a firefighting school for the crash crews, Navy does shipboard firefighting, Marines have crash crews for the air wing
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    First off, many fire departments do offer veterans points, not just big cities. In fact every dept I ever tested for accepted my veterans points. The other info about having had to serve in a combat zone is not the case entirely either. Most depts giving points were only if you were in the service during a conflict.

    For me I was in from 94-99, no major conflicts then and I was never in a war zone. Yet I still qualified for the points because I was in the service and the first gulf war was not officially ended. The way things are going now, pretty much every vet serving and even those thinking about joining will qualify for veteran points.


    As for FF in the service, one does NOT have to be a FF in order to get a better chance at getting hired on a career dept. As far as I know the Air Force is the only one qualifying FF's in IFSAC, which do reflect in many states for FF1 and FF2 certs. (Not all states or depts). Also an infantry soldier has pretty much the same chance of getting a FF job as a military FF.

    Vets points typically are given because of the core values of the military, the discipline, chain of command, leadership, attention to detail, etc. Not the fact that they were a FF. The dept wants certain people characteristics, they can pretty much train anyone to be a FF. Just something to think about.

    I was a Navy FF and all the certs I got while in, didn't mean squat when I got out. Yet the experience truly helped and so did those core values.

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    Will national guard receive vet points?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paddiegrunt View Post
    They give veterans credit of 10 points(but to get it you have to serve in a combat zone), Air Force has a firefighting school for the crash crews, Navy does shipboard firefighting, Marines have crash crews for the air wing

    Not true. Serving 3 or 4 years active duty gets you 10 points in most cases. Some depts allow extra points on top of that for combat zone time, which is usually pro-rated for the amount of time in-country, using a formula.
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    NYS gives you 5 pts if you are a vetren, 10 pts if you are a disabled vet.


    heres what the app for NYS looks like and it gives some info http://www.ci.rochester.ny.us/main/docs/veterans.pdf

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    Military Experience
    Candidates who have served our country in the Armed Forces have a huge advantage over those who have not. It is generally believed that while a military veterans may not have as many certificates and fire science units as the other candidates (they were busy serving our country), they offer so much more.
    There is no substitute for life experience. The personal growth a young man or woman experiences in the military is second to none. This growth is of course magnified depending on the assignments held. Many of those who joined the military at a young age grew up very rapidly when put into dangerous situations.
    Being assigned to the front line is not required to get “credit” for serving in the military. Fire departments realize that there are many support roles that require dedication and commitment. While there is only one person on the nozzle that puts out the fire, there are numerous other assignments that need to take place on the fire ground. It is important that a firefighter be willing to work in a support role for the good of the team.
    The fire service is a para-military organization. Many of the common terms in the fire service, such as Captain and lieutenants were taken directly from the military. Words like code, honor, commitment, and integrity are as important to the fire service as they are to the military.
    Men and women with military backgrounds are usually very mature, regardless of their age. They understand the need to get along with others, especially with people who come from different backgrounds from them. They understand commitment and the need to work until the job is completed. They are used to working for long periods of time in less than ideal conditions.
    Physical fitness is emphasized in the military. As a result military men and women are usually in very good shape. This is extremely important to the fire service, because the number one reason entry-level candidates fail out of the academy is due to poor physical fitness. In addition, a physically fit firefighter will miss less time due to injury than a firefighter who is not fit. Military personnel have been taught the importance of a life-long physical fitness program and the importance of proper diet. These good habits will be shared with the firefighters in the station.
    Military people demonstrate respect for authority and understand the chain of command. The fire service operates on the same hierarchy principle as the military. The group clearly understands code and honor. These qualities are extremely important in the fire service, because firefighters are held to a higher standard than the average person in the community.
    Military men and women are used to working in a structured environment. They understand the importance of doing something right the first time. Similar to the fire department, people’s lives are impacted if things are not kept in a constant state of operational readiness. Firefighters must check out their equipment each and every day. They must know the intricacies of each tool kept on the engine or truck. Training and continuing education are essential to the fire service. It is imperative that firefighters are able to work unsupervised; completion of a job or task is a reflection of them.
    Getting along in the fire station is critically important to being successful in the fire service. Courtesy to fellow firefighters is critical. Cleaning up after one self is expected. This is one of the first things military men and women learn in Basic Training.
    One of the strengths found in military men and women, however, is also commonly a cause of strife during their probationary year. People who have earned rank in the military are used to giving orders. As a rookie firefighter you are expected to take orders, not give them. Humility is an extremely important quality to possess as a rookie firefighter. Oftentimes rookie firefighters who have spent time in the military are older than the average candidate.
    It is not uncommon for an older probationary firefighter to be working under the tutelage of a much younger senior firefighter, engineer, or even lieutenant or captain. If the rookie firefighter does not have the proper mind set, he or she will be in for a difficult probationary year.
    If you are still in the military and are interested in a career in the fire service, it is important that you start making provisions NOW. Start taking online classes NOW.
    If possible, put yourself in a position to get fire service-related training such as Medic or Corpsman. Hazardous Materials and firefighter training will also be beneficial. Lastly, work on general education courses so you can earn your Associates degree.
    Do not be intimidated by all of the candidates who have every certification under the sun. They were able to obtain these as full-time students while you were busy fulfilling your continuous to the American people.
    A candidate who is an EMT, possesses related experience as a reserve or volunteer firefighter, and is active taking fire science courses is usually at the top of his or her game. Get your qualifications, learn how to take a fire department interview, and earn your badge.

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    www.aspiringfirefighters.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by jccrabby3084 View Post
    As for FF in the service, one does NOT have to be a FF in order to get a better chance at getting hired on a career dept. As far as I know the Air Force is the only one qualifying FF's in IFSAC, which do reflect in many states for FF1 and FF2 certs. (Not all states or depts). Also an infantry soldier has pretty much the same chance of getting a FF job as a military FF.

    Vets points typically are given because of the core values of the military, the discipline, chain of command, leadership, attention to detail, etc. Not the fact that they were a FF. The dept wants certain people characteristics, they can pretty much train anyone to be a FF. Just something to think about.
    When it comes down to it, after they had both been through our academy, I'd rather have a former Grunt sitting next to me on the fire truck than a former REMF Firefighter any day.
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    I’ve been in the military. I often hear from candidates asking if going into the military to become a firefighter is a good idea? They’ve heard you can gain training, experience, it will great to put on their resume and talk about in their oral. The ones that decide to go into the military I seldom hear from again. What seems to happen is they don’t get the job specialty, low pay, station assignment, get trapped with bills, get married, have kids and a slug of other diversions.

    I recently heard from a guy from Penn, who wanted to be a firefighter, thought he was too young and went into the Airforce thinking it would help. Nine years later this Sergeant is stationed at a B-1 Bomber base in bum f$$$ Egypt ND trying to keep his family of four together while he tries to test back home.

    No matter what your credentials it all comes down to presenting them in an oral board that will make the difference. Can you imagine a Navy Seal Medic that couldn’t get hired? Yep, that’s right. Even with military credits, this super qualified candidate couldn’t get hired. Why? He couldn’t pass the oral high enough to get called back. More here: http://www.eatstress.com/cantgethired.htm
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptBob View Post
    I’ve been in the military. I often hear from candidates asking if going into the military to become a firefighter is a good idea? They’ve heard you can gain training, experience, it will great to put on their resume and talk about in their oral. The ones that decide to go into the military I seldom hear from again. What seems to happen is they don’t get the job specialty, low pay, station assignment, get trapped with bills, get married, have kids and a slug of other diversions.

    I recently heard from a guy from Penn, who wanted to be a firefighter, thought he was too young and went into the Airforce thinking it would help. Nine years later this Sergeant is stationed at a B-1 Bomber base in bum f$$$ Egypt ND trying to keep his family of four together while he tries to test back home.

    No matter what your credentials it all comes down to presenting them in an oral board that will make the difference. Can you imagine a Navy Seal Medic that couldn’t get hired? Yep, that’s right. Even with military credits, this super qualified candidate couldn’t get hired. Why? He couldn’t pass the oral high enough to get called back. More here: http://www.eatstress.com/cantgethired.htm
    If a guy joins the military and can't find his way out to apply to the fire department, he probably would not be the type of guy that was much of an asset to the fire department in the first place. If he is stuck because he got married and had kids, he would likely be the guy that got married and had kids in the fire department and had problems with the firefighter schedule too. Or maybe he realized that the military was the life for him more so than his childhood dream of becoming a firefighter.

    As for the Navy SEAL Corpsman that could not see past poor oral skills, what it takes to become a SEAL and a Corpsman is far tougher and requires more heart than anything that we do in the fire service, I will put that down as a serious loss and mistake for that department. The SEAL veteran will end up doing fine in a department that is not as short sighted as the one with so much weight on a 15-30 minute talk.

    You have sat on boards, how can a guy that lets you know he is a SEAL with medical training not impress you? If he appeared too cocky and not willing to place himself in the role of the proby, did you all not realize that until two years ago every sailor that entered BUD/s was a veteran with at least two years in who subjected himself to being pond scum again? Honestly, can you give a real world example of how such a candidate has stumbled before a Board that you sat on?
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
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    Instead of incorporating his personal life and military experiences, the Navy Seal like too many candidates was loaded with "clone" answers that everyone else was using. They end up in the clone pack. Not getting a high enough score to make the cut and get hired.
    Last edited by CaptBob; 12-11-2007 at 03:55 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptBob View Post
    Instead of incorporating his personal life and military experiences, the Navy Seal like too many candidates was loaded with "clone" answers that everyone else was using. They end up in the clone pack. Not getting a high enough score to make the cut and get hired.
    What are these "Clone" answers? As long as they learned what he has done, I would think that would show his commitment and capability. Should these interviews really be oral creative writing contests? I hope that when the time comes that I am forced to sit on one of these boards that I show a little better judgement and openness than that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyckftbl View Post
    LOL....dont you people have anything else to do besides b*tch about our b*tching?

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    I hope that when the time comes that I am forced to sit on one of these boards that I show a little better judgement and openness than that.

    When you get that opportunity to sit on an oral board you will quickly see the parade of the clones and how many aren't prepared for the most important part of the process to get hired. The oral board.

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