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    Default What gear would you bring to a wildfire?

    What gear would you bring to a wildfire/forest fire? I've been getting word that you wouldn't want to wear turnout gear at a forest fire.
    Last edited by Explorer343; 09-07-2007 at 05:51 PM. Reason: elaborated on previous post

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    Quote Originally Posted by Explorer343 View Post
    (self explanatory)
    No it isn't. Be more specific. Where, what time, how big, whats burning, manpower? apparatus available? season? Want me to go on?
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nmfire View Post
    No it isn't. Be more specific. Where, what time, how big, whats burning, manpower? apparatus available? season? Want me to go on?
    Not to mention, by equipment do we mean apparatus? Or is he referring to specific tools and their uses, e.g. Pulaskis, McLeods, shovels, chainsaws, portable pumps, drip torches, etc...

    Edit to add: To answer the question (which is how one gains wisdom, after all ), I would bring all of the above, and then some...preferably in a 4x4 engine with at least a 300 gal tank and 75 GPM pump.
    Last edited by the1141man; 09-07-2007 at 05:36 PM.
    My opinions might coincide with someone of importance's POV... I wouldn't know, since I never bothered to ask. My policy is: "Don't ask, don't care."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Explorer343 View Post
    What gear would you bring to a wildfire/forest fire? I've been getting word that you wouldn't want to wear turnout gear at a forest fire.
    Much better. See what a little effort does?

    As for structure gear at a wildland fire...sure, you can wear full structural gear...if you don't mind becoming intimately familiar with the symptomology of heat stroke.
    My opinions might coincide with someone of importance's POV... I wouldn't know, since I never bothered to ask. My policy is: "Don't ask, don't care."

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    The main thing I know about wild land work is that most people have brush jackets and pants that give protection to the person well not being as bulky or warm as normal turnouts would be. Water is another good thing to have as well. as well as "fancy gardening tools" (as it one was so explained to me) like a bent shovel or gardening hoe. Honestly I don't know exactly. But clothing wise you normally would have a brush jacket/pants. Also I believe the helmets are a little different.

    I hope to start to get my Red card so I can possibly do some work once I graduate this year. Or I may need to wait a year.
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    Let me preface this by saying a "wildland fire" here is nothing more than burning leaves and maybe some small underbrush. Trees don't burn here, just the already dead junk on the ground. They are quite tame.

    That said, we can wear jeans and work boots or bunker pants and boots. Sneakers, sandels, or any other kind of clothing is not allowed. Bunker coats are never worn unless it is actually winter. Helmets and gloves always.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nmfire View Post
    Let me preface this by saying a "wildland fire" here is nothing more than burning leaves and maybe some small underbrush. Trees don't burn here, just the already dead junk on the ground. They are quite tame.

    That said, we can wear jeans and work boots or bunker pants and boots. Sneakers, sandels, or any other kind of clothing is not allowed. Bunker coats are never worn unless it is actually winter. Helmets and gloves always.
    Are you in the west with all the forest fires?

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    Talking more wildland f/fs

    Don't do "wildfires", they scare me. God bless all the folks brave (crazy?) enough to stand in front of a 50+ ft. wall of fire moving at 35 mph and think, Wow! I (we) can stop THIS! !

    I will crawl through a house, store, other, to save a life, but that stuff is NUTS. Seriously, around here a "wildfire" is maybe an acre of burning duff and dried deadfall. We roll Brush units that are small p/u based rigs backed up by engines and tankers as required.

    Far as "clothing" - work boots, jeans, long sleeved shirt (poison ivy sucks), gloves, eye prot., ear prot. (for saws & stuff), "construction" helmet

    Structural gear is for inside structures. You WILL rapidly overheat wearing it to an "outdoor" event.
    Last edited by Binaroundawhile; 09-08-2007 at 04:47 PM. Reason: added what I forgot

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    As mentioned, gear is usually dedicated, specifically designed suits for those in high-volume areas. Can be coveralls, cotton/nomex/pro-ban shirt and pant sets, or special wildland turnouts. You can also use your turnout shells only (no thermal liner) if you are going to be on a true fireline for an extended operation.

    We have general purpose Pro-ban coveralls for all members, as well as some old retired gear shells that we use (thermal liners removed). It makes a decent lightweight flash-proof shell, at least until we get around to buying some dedicated gear.

    Footwear should be a good leather boot, preferably steel toe at least. Approved helmets are a good idea, gloves are necessary, and eye protection is a must (full wrap safety glasses/sunglasses, or goggles). If you are going to be working a power saw; chaps, workboots, gloves, helmet, eye/face and hearing protection are mandatory. Guys like a bandana or particle mask for big fires.


    Bring your radio, lots of water, and a couple of power bars. Who knows when the chow truck will arrive. Hand tools are specific to the environment. Here we use pulaski's, shovels, rakes, axes (for roots), sandviks (for branches) and chainsaws. Not stuff you carry in your POV.


    For trucks, some use little pickups or jeeps, others use full-size engines. We have both an old 79 short wheelbase "bumper pumper" with an 840 front mount pump, and our F-350 gets a small 100 gallon water tank and some hand tools during peak fire season.

    Next year we will take delivery on a new 4x4 wildland/crash rescue engine with CAFS to replace the old 79.
    Last edited by mcaldwell; 09-08-2007 at 06:09 PM.
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    Mike,

    The tools we'd use would be forestry rakes, pulaskis, shovels, chainsaws, maybe pruners. For suppression you'd use the backpack indian cans or the knee knockers; if it's a good one we'd lay 1/1'2 inch hose. We might also use the wet water system. Just look on either
    of the F's and you'll see all you need to see.

    -Deputy Cross does a lesson with us every spring where he tells us all we need to know about brushfires.
    Last edited by Motorhead90; 09-09-2007 at 03:30 PM.

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