Why register? ...To Enhance Your Experience
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36
  1. #1
    Forum Member BKDRAFT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    1,146

    Question Chainsaws to the roof...

    Carry them up the ladder running or not running? What's your opinion and department's SOPs?


  2. #2
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    933

    Default

    We do not have a SOP on this, however.......beginning of shift.start the saw, let it run for a few minutes.......at a fire ....start it up before going up the ladder....shut it off and reset any switches so that when you get to the roof all you have to do is give it a pull. It does no good to get to the roof with a saw that won't start.

  3. #3
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    517

    Default

    What 7554 said.

    I hope it also goes without saying that the throttle, brake, choke/on....all in the ready position so all you have to do is pull the starter. No one likes fumbling around in the dark on the Charlie side of a SFD at 2:53AM trying to start the saw before it goes up the ladder.
    You only have to be stupid once to be dead permanently
    IACOJ Power Company Liason
    When trouble arises and things look bad, there is always one individual who perceives a solution
    and is willing to take command. Very often, that individual is crazy. - Dave Barry.

  4. #4
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Jacksonville Fl
    Posts
    507

    Default

    as a preference i would rather not be heaving pull strokes while standing on a pitched roof. If its a chainsaw id rather set the brake, crank it and carry it up. the partner saw doesnt leave much choice.

    if it comes down to it there is a way to start saws while maintaining a "kneeling" position, and im pretty sure our SOP says crank it on the ground and kill it, restart on the roof.

  5. #5
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    130

    Default

    We do not have an SOP on this but,

    Quote Originally Posted by LeatherHed4Life View Post
    crank it on the ground and kill it, restart on the roof.

  6. #6
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Here, There, Everywhere
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BKDRAFT View Post
    Carry them up the ladder running or not running? What's your opinion and department's SOPs?

    We don't use chainsaws on the roof...however we do start the partner saws once up there.

    Why start them on the ground?

    FTM-PTB

  7. #7
    Forum Member BKDRAFT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FFFRED View Post
    We don't use chainsaws on the roof...however we do start the partner saws once up there.

    Why start them on the ground?

    FTM-PTB
    To make sure it works, and to get it warm. Since it is already running might as well leave it on and brake it. Climb the ladder and cut the roof. I think it easier and safer than starting it on a pitched roof.

  8. #8
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 1999
    Location
    Here, There, Everywhere
    Posts
    4,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BKDRAFT View Post
    To make sure it works, and to get it warm. Since it is already running might as well leave it on and brake it. Climb the ladder and cut the roof. I think it easier and safer than starting it on a pitched roof.
    You didn't mention pitched roof. We only use saws on pitched roofs from the Tower Ladder Buckets...safety issue.

    Second...around here we've found it best if we start the saw at the begining of every tour...that way it fires right up if we use it that tour...no need to waste time at a fire.

    FTM-PTB

  9. #9
    the 4-1-4 Jasper 45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    ...A great place, on a Great Lake
    Posts
    2,783

    Default

    We work on pitched roofs everyday, but not with chain saws. We only use circular saws, such as the Husqvarna.
    We check them in the morning, as we start our shift, to check the blade, fuel levels, and over all condition of the saw. We also clean them after every use.
    We also don't necessarily start them every day. You can, if you want to, but it really isn't needed. If the saw is well maintained, it will start with no problem.
    Now, don't mistake that as not being familiar with the saw, and how to start it. We are very anal with keeping them clean and working.

    I also wouldn't start it just before going to a roof, we've had problems with them flooding out on the roof. This tends to happen with the Huskys that we use now. Also, I would never climb a ladder with a running saw, too dangerous. Some saws, the blade will spin some if it is running, and you can choke the saw out, too. Then you would have to restart it on the roof anyhow.
    Last edited by jasper45; 12-02-2007 at 09:40 AM.

  10. #10
    the 4-1-4 Jasper 45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    ...A great place, on a Great Lake
    Posts
    2,783

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BKDRAFT View Post
    I think it easier and safer than starting it on a pitched roof.
    We spend a lot of time drilling on how to start a saw on a pitched roof. All it really takes is some practice. We do learn it in the school, but we pound heavily in the field on starting them on roofs.

  11. #11
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northeast Coast
    Posts
    3,807

    Default

    We teach starting it on the ground b/c most of the vol. FD's around here don't have personnel in the station every day, so there is little hope htat the saws get proper exercise.

    The last two regional academy classes in my area on ventilation showed just how far into the X-Box generation we've slipped. The students are taught to start the saw on the ground to ensure it works. They then shut it down, ready it to restart and go to the roof. Nearly half of the students struggled to start the saw on the roof. It seemed to be a combination of the lack of upper body strength, not being comfortable on the roof, and not being "hands on" at all. This was on a peak roof mock-up. The ones who were carpenters or other tradesman types had no issues, but he younger kids really had to practice and it was like watching the proverbial monkey with the football. We literally have had to discuss making the ventilation class longer to teach more power tool basics. We definitely decided that local vollie academy or not, they need an entrance exam that shows their physical ability and drive.

    On my job the saws get started daily and it's up to the FF whether he starts it on the ground or not. Jut as long as it starts when needed.

  12. #12
    Forum Member Slaytallica45's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Belle Mead, NJ
    Posts
    282

    Default

    We do not have a set SOP on this, however for the most part around here it is common practice to start the saw at the truck, let it run while carrying it to the ladder so it is warmed up, then shut it off and set it up so that all the roof guys have to do is give it a pull when they get up there
    NJ FFII/EMT-B

  13. #13
    MembersZone Subscriber
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Wheaton IL
    Posts
    1,765

    Default

    I wouldn't rely on the chain break to keep you safe. If it is hit the chain could start spinning.
    Satrt the saw on the ground then restart it on the roof.

  14. #14
    Forum Member johnny46's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    2,094

    Default

    If we were going to the roof, my captain wanted me to get the saw and start it for them while they threw the ladder and all that. It worked smoothly.

    If your saw's blade spins while it's idling, then don't start it on the ground if you don't want to. To avoid starting any saw because some do this is ridiculous--adjust to your situation and equipment.

  15. #15
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    65

    Default

    Our SOP's say, start it on the ground and run it for a few seconds, then engage the chain break. If it has a chain cover, you can extend the cover and carry it up the ladder running. If it does not have a chain cover then you have to shut it down before going up the ladder. All of our chain saws have chain breaks, and most of them have chain covers.
    We start the chain on the ground so that we know it works and we don't have to mess around with getting a cold saw started on the roof.

  16. #16
    Forum Member FyredUp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 1999
    Location
    Rural Wisconsin, Retired from the burbs of Milwaukee
    Posts
    9,860

    Default

    The vent saw we use is a chain saw with a chain brake and a depth gauge/ safety cover for the chain. We start the saw on the ground set the brake, leave the depth gauge covering the chain and climb up with the saw running.

    Safer to start on the ground and safe to carry up.

  17. #17
    Forum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    38

    Default

    I'm on an engine, as "engies" we'd rather not touch the "truckies" crap....but I think they usually start 'em up on the ground, shut 'em down, then restart 'em on the roof.

  18. #18
    Forum Member Bones42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    Pt. Beach, NJ
    Posts
    10,657

    Default

    Depends. How's that for a concrete answer.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

  19. #19
    Forum Member BKDRAFT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Bay Area, California
    Posts
    1,146

    Thumbs down

    Quote Originally Posted by Bones42 View Post
    Depends. How's that for a concrete answer.
    What do you have some suspensful answer coming? I am on the edge of my seat waiting refreshing the page every minute until you reply. I can't wait really.

    I can't stand crap like this. If you don't have the time or any useful information to add to the discussion why even put stupid replys like this? It gets old. Real old.

    We all know it "depends."

    How's that for a concrete reply?

  20. #20
    Forum Member nyckftbl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    On a Hill, overlooking George's Kingdom
    Posts
    2,572

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BKDRAFT View Post
    What do you have some suspensful answer coming? I am on the edge of my seat waiting refreshing the page every minute until you reply. I can't wait really.

    I can't stand crap like this. If you don't have the time or any useful information to add to the discussion why even put stupid replys like this? It gets old. Real old.

    We all know it "depends."

    How's that for a concrete reply?
    Who the f*ck ****ed in your wheaties?
    Proud East Coast Traditionalist.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Roof flap vs. Total roof removal
    By eng71ine in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 05-17-2006, 10:01 PM
  2. Of chainsaws, step ladders and gravity
    By blancety in forum The Off Duty Forums
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 06-10-2004, 09:21 AM
  3. Chainsaws for Auto extrication
    By Jeff801 in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 07-02-2002, 12:01 AM
  4. Chainsaws???
    By montgomery in forum Firefighters Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-15-2001, 04:04 PM
  5. Advice on Roof Removal with Roof Airbags
    By rmoore in forum University of Extrication
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-24-2001, 10:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts